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Archive for the ‘ Items of Potential Interest’ Category

Without Support for Research, There Will Be No Medical Breakthroughs

Monday, April 27th, 2015

From the Huffington Post:

Many in the scientific community lament that the purchasing power of the National Institutes for Health has decreased 25 percent over the past decade. Despite the economic (not to mention lifesaving) benefits of medical research, our Congressional leadership has not stepped up to ensure the future: “We wish we could, but we simply cannot make this a priority.” It’s a startling example of political myopia — valuing short term savings over long-term commitment and an investment in greatness.

If funding for biomedical research continues to decline — if the U.S. abdicates its global leadership role — future researchers and their medical advances will be lost–and the nation will suffer from its leadership’s myopia. And since each generation trains the next, losing a generation of scientists will have a debilitating long-term impact. Government, private enterprise and philanthropic investment in biomedical research is critical if we hope to benefit from the paradigm-shifting breakthroughs that could be made by today’s young researchers.

Read the full article.


New ebooks from AccessSurgery

Sunday, April 26th, 2015

Steven M. Dean, Bhagwan Satiani, William T. Abraham

Hundreds of High-Quality Images Span the Entire Spectrum of Vascular Disease

David J. Sugarbaker, MD, Raphael Bueno, MD, Yolonda L. Colson, MD, Michael T. Jaklitsch, MD, Mark J. Krasna, MD, Steven J. Mentzer, MD, Marcia Williams, Ann Adams

The most authoritative, comprehensive, and clinically focused guide to operative thoracic surgery–updated with the latest techniques and technologies

Kathryn L. Butler, Mukesh Harisinghani

Improve your imaging interpretation skills for the most commonly encountered surgical conditions


What’s New on AccessMedicine

Friday, April 24th, 2015
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Harrison’s Principles of Internal Medicine, 19e

Harrison’s is the world leader in applied pathophysiology. Harrison’s 19e includes many helpful new chapters and completely updated diagnostic and therapeutic guidance in virtually every area of medicine, from new hypertension guidelines to coverage of new anti-coagulant medications.

Read More

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Fishman’s Pulmonary Diseases and Disorders, 5e

Turn to the field’s definitive text for a thorough understanding of the clinical and scientific aspects of pulmonary medicine

This book begins with a comprehensive overview of the scientific basis of lung function in health and disease. It then provides detailed coverage of the broad array of diseases and disorders affecting the respiratory system, including obstructive and restrictive diseases, pulmonary vascular disorders, sleep-disordered breathing, lung neoplasms, respiratory infections, and respiratory failure, among others.

Read More

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Principles of Critical Care, 4e

Jesse B. HallQuickly and accurately diagnose and treat the critically ill patient with guidance from the field’s definitive text

“…Clearly the finest textbook available in the field.”
– Critical Care Medicine journal

“…Very well done…unusually user-friendly… excellent…a significant contribution to the field. It should be placed not only in the critical care practitioner’s library, but also in the rounds and nurses’ conference rooms of critical care units.” — Journal of the American Medical Association

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Quick Medical Diagnosis & Treatment 2015 (QMDT)

Maxine A. Papadakis, Stephen J. McPheeQuick Medical Dx & Rx is a collection of concise evidence-based outlines of conditions and disorders most often encountered in medical practice – perfect for high-yield review or for quick reference in the clinical setting.

Read More


On My Own Time artwork submissions due Thursday, April 30

Thursday, April 23rd, 2015

On My Own Time, an art program showcasing workforce creativity throughout central New York businesses, will be on display May 1 to 29 in the Upstate Health Sciences Library in Weiskotten Hall. To submit your artwork, email the registration form (pdf link) to Clare Rauch, rauchc@upstate.edu. Forms are due April 30.

Anyone affiliated with Upstate is welcome to participate, but only the artwork of Upstate employees and retirees will be judged.


New Releases to The Biomedical & Life Sciences Collection

Thursday, April 23rd, 2015

Henry Stewart Talks: The Biomedical & Life Sciences Collection features over 1,500 online lectures by leading world experts.

SUNY Upstate has full access to all the lectures.

Access link: http://hsl.upstate.edu/hstalks
On campus, you should be automatically authenticated. Off site, you may be asked for a username and Password.
Username:  UPSTATE
Password:  MEMBER

The Biomedical & Life Sciences Collection

New talks added to existing series: Human Population Genetics II

The genetic history of Australia, Oceania, and Southeast Asia – part 1 of 2

Prof. Mark Stoneking, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, DE

The genetic history of Australia, Oceania, and Southeast Asia – part 2 of 2

Prof. Mark Stoneking, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, DE

Genetic variation in North America

Prof. Ripan Malhi, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA

Human population growth and its impact on genetic variation

Prof. Andrew Clark, Cornell University, USA

Human admixture – part 1 of 2

Dr. Paul Verdu, Centre national de la recherche scientifique, FR

Human admixture – part 2 of 2

Dr. Paul Verdu, Centre national de la recherche scientifique, FR

Genetic variation in gene regulation

Prof. Jonathan Pritchard, Stanford University, USA

Cross-talk between cultural and genetic evolution in humans

Prof. Evelyne Heyer, National Museum of Natural History, FR

New talks added to existing series: Non-Clinical Testing for Toxicity of Pharmaceuticals

Toxicology of the kidney

Prof. Lawrence Lash, Wayne State University School of Medicine, USA

New talks added to existing series: Topical Talks

Teixobactin kills pathogens without detectable resistance

Prof. Kim Lewis, Northeastern University, USA


Mammograms a Personal Decision for Women in Their 40s, Panel Says

Wednesday, April 22nd, 2015

Women in their 40s should talk with their doctors and then decide for themselves whether they need regular mammograms to screen for breast cancer before age 50, according to draft U.S. federal health guidelines.

The draft mammography guidelines issued April 20 by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) largely reiterate those that have been in place since 2009, the last time they were updated.

The guidelines still recommend mammograms to screen for breast cancer every two years for women ages 50 to 74.

 

Read the full story at MedlinePlus.


Artist Receptions at HSL Tuesday 4/21 and Wednesday 4/22

Tuesday, April 21st, 2015
Artist Reception for the Scholar’s Den Tuesday 4/21 4-6pm
Artist Reception for the Upstate Artist Group 1st floor Wednesday 4/22 5-7pm
Both groups feature Upstate Students – both will have snack and the HSL’s famous complementary coffee!

JAAPA Case of the Month: Abdominal pain after air travel

Monday, April 13th, 2015

Case of the Month: Abdominal pain after air travel

A 29-year-old woman was brought to the ED in police custody from an international airport with a chief complaint of lower abdominal pain for the past 2 hours. The patient was reluctant to give any information during the initial history. When asked what brought her in, she said she had no complaints and the police made her come in. She stated she was feeling well and did not want to be in the ED.

The patient was alert and in no apparent distress. An abdominal examination revealed normal active bowel sounds in all four quadrants, and no abdominal tenderness, guarding, rebound, or palpable masses were noted. The patient refused a pelvic examination. A urine sample was obtained to check for pregnancy. The nurse noted that the patient’s urine was very dark and foul-smelling.

Read the case FREE online – read the rest of the case facts, get the diagnosis, and learn how the case progressed. It’s the Case of the Month in JAAPA: Journal of the American Academy of Physician Assistants.


World Voice Day is April 16th

Monday, April 13th, 2015

World Voice Day encourages everyone to assess their vocal health and take action to improve or maintain good voice habits.

The American Academy of Otolaryngology Head & Neck Association monthly Bulletin offers some tips for a health voice:

Do drink water-  six to eight glasses a day optimized the throat’s mucous production and aids lubrication
Do live a healthy lifestyle- including exercise, eating healthy, and adequate sleep
Do warm up your before heavy voice use
Do
use a vocal amplification system
Do
use good breath support

 

Don’t drink an excessive amount of coffee, tea, soda or alcohol – these drinks dehydrate you and dry out your vocal cords, and worsen acid reflux
Don’t smoke – leads to lung or throat cancer; can cause significant irritation and swelling of the vocal cords which will permanently change your voice quality
Don’t abuse or misuse your voice
Don’t
clear your throat more than necessary

For more do’s and dont’s for a healthy voice, read the article by Amanda Hu, MD from the Bulletin, or review Clinical practice guidelines: hoarseness (dysphonia).

Providers, see more articles on dysphonia from SAGE Journals (Upstate login required for off-campus).

Patients, read more about dysphonia. Talk to your doctor about a referal to the Syracuse Voice Center.


Special Walking events in April

Thursday, April 9th, 2015
On Monday, April 13th, Fleet Feet coach Mandy Howard will lead Fleet Feet’s Good Form program from 12-12:30 in Bird Library room 606, SU, and then we will head outside to walk the Monday Mile using good form techniques!
April 13 - Good form workshop at 12pm & Walk Fleet Feet at 12:30pm
April 20 - Walk with a Fleet Feet Coach at 12 pm
April 27 - Walk with a Fleet Feet Coach at 12 pm
Walks will begin in front of Schine Student Center on the SU Campus

Visit Upstate Pathways to Wellness to learn more about this and other offerings.

 

 

 

Image from Flickr