Archive Posts

Archive for the ‘ urology’ Category

Less-invasive urinary tract surgery; treating rotator cuff, other shoulder injuries; researching diabetes remedies: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, Aug. 21, 2016

Friday, August 19th, 2016

Urologists Dmitriy Nikolavsky, MD, and Jonathan Riddell, MD, talk about surgical innovations to correct problems with the urinary tract in men, women and children. Orthopedic surgeon L. Ryan Smart, MD, discusses common shoulder injuries and their treatment. Ruth Weinstock, MD, PhD, tells about research that is shaping the way diabetes is managed.

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New techniques for urinary tract surgery are less invasive

Thursday, August 11th, 2016

A variety of new reconstructive and minimally invasive treatments are being used to correct problems with the urinary tract in men, women and children. Upstate urologist Dmitriy Nikolavsky, MD (at left in photo), describes how he created a surgical procedure to restore a damaged urethra – the tube through which urine leaves the body – using a patient’s own tissue and avoiding the need for a tube implant. Jonathan Riddell, MD (at right), a pediatric urologist at Upstate, tells how he uses a minimally invasive robotic surgery system to correct urinary tube problems without large incisions or long hospital stays, how Botox injections help control bladder incontinence and how urinary problems can be diagnosed, and treated, before birth. Research points to a future where restorative grafting will be done in innovative and ever less invasive ways, Nikolavsky says.

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Pancreas transplants, preventing drowning, breast cancer/prostate cancer link: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for July 10, 2016

Friday, July 8th, 2016

July 10, 2016

Transplant surgeons Rainer Gruessner, MD, and Mark Laftavi, MD, discuss the pancreas transplant program. Pediatrician Robert Newmyer, MD, talks about drowning and water safety. Urologist Srinivas Vourganti, MD, tells how the “breast cancer gene” increases a man’s risk of prostate cancer.

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Inherited gene linked to prostate cancer as well as breast cancer in study

Thursday, June 30th, 2016

A gene mutation linked to breast cancer appears to play a role in some prostate cancer as well, according to a study co-authored by Upstate urologist Srinivas Vourganti, MD. The study looked mostly at the BRCA2 genes, which, when mutated, can lead to breast cancer. When they occur in close relatives, these mutated genes raise the risk of breast cancer for women as well as prostate cancer for men, the study shows, and those prostate cancers tend to be more aggressive. Vourganti explains how a medical student conceived the idea for the study, its implications for African-American men in particular, and how the knowledge might help shape future screenings and treatments.

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Variety of medications treat advanced prostate cancer

Wednesday, June 22nd, 2016

Most men with prostate cancer can be treated successfully through surgery and/or radiation, but when the cancer has spread to other parts of the body, a systemic approach using medication is often prescribed, says Bernard Poiesz, MD, a professor of medicine at the Upstate Cancer Center. He describes both advances in and limitations of treatments for metastatic prostate cancer, such as hormone therapy, chemotherapy and immunotherapy, which stimulates the body’s immune system to attack the cancer.

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Breast-feeding, prostate cancer treatments and historical medical photographs: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for June 26, 2016

Wednesday, June 22nd, 2016

June 26, 2016

Jayne Charlamb, MD, explains why more mothers are breast-feeding their babies. Bernard Poiesz, MD, discusses medications to treat advanced prostate cancer. Upstate graduate Stanley Burns, MD, tells about his historical collection of medical photographs and his work advising TV shows.

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Prostate cancer drugs, dealing with acne, exercise for cancer patients: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for June 12, 2016

Friday, June 10th, 2016

Pharmacist Andrew Burgdorf discusses the variety of medications available to treat prostate cancer. Dermatologist Ramsay Farah, MD, tells about the causes of and treatments for acne. Physical therapist Cassi Terpening explains the benefits of exercise during cancer treatment.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: April 24, 2016

Friday, April 22nd, 2016

April 24, 2016

Pediatric urologist Matthew Mason, MD, explains diagnosis and treatment of undescended testicles and other urologic problems that affect babies. Urologist Natasha Ginzburg, MD, discusses pelvic floor disorders affecting women. Urologist JC Trussell, MD, tells about causes and treatments for erectile dysfunction.

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Erectile dysfunction is both common and treatable

Thursday, April 14th, 2016

Erectile dysfunction is a common problem that is generally treated with a three-tiered approach, says Upstate urologist JC Trussell, MD. Erectile dysfunction is the persistent inability to achieve or maintain a penile erection for satisfactory sexual performance, Trussell says, and it’s an issue for more men as they get older. He describes the types of ED, contributing factors including stress, diabetes and heart disease, and the usual remedies, starting with medications, then moving to devices if needed, and, as a last option, an implanted prosthesis, all of which have had high rates of success.

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Range of options available to treat pelvic floor disorders in women

Thursday, April 14th, 2016

The pelvic floor is a complex structure that can be the source of disorders as women age and bear children, says Natasha Ginzburg, MD, urologist and director of female pelvic medicine and surgery at Upstate. She describes the pelvic floor as a hammock of muscle and tissue that, in women, includes the vagina, rectum and uterus. Problems with urination, defecation and protruding organs in the pelvic floor can be treated successfully through behavioral changes, physical therapy, medicines and biofeedback, with surgery (generally minimally invasive) as a last choice, she said.

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Undescended testicle more common in premature baby boys

Thursday, April 14th, 2016

An undescended testicle occurs in about 3 percent of full-term baby boys but in as many as 45 percent of boys born prematurely, explains Matthew Mason, MD, a pediatric urologist at Upstate. The reasons why one testicle (or occasionally both) does not find its way to the scrotum are unclear, he says, noting that pediatricians check for this problem in well-child visits. Mason also describes aspects of the condition and possible complications, such as reduced fertility and testicular cancer, as well as treatment options.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: April 17, 2016

Thursday, April 14th, 2016

April 17, 2016

Urologist Oleg Shapiro, MD, discusses kidney cancer. Nurses Lorrie Langdon and Michelle Vallelunga tell about atrial fibrillation and its connection to stroke. Wikipedian Lane Rasberry talks about the medical information available at the online encyclopedia.

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