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Archive for the ‘ Upstate Medical University/University Hospital’ Category

New Emergency Department director talks about what lays ahead

Thursday, October 9th, 2014

Jeremy D Joslin, MD Jeremy Joslin, MD, new medical director of the emergency department at Upstate Medical University, tells what to expect when you visit a level 1 trauma center, the specialty services available, and his vision and goals for emergency medicine at Upstate. Joslin is assistant professor and fellowship program director of Emergency Medicine at Upstate. 


HealthLink On Air radio show: Oct. 19, 2014

Thursday, October 9th, 2014

HealthLink on Air radio show art in pinkBreast cancer researchers share their projects. Leszek Kotula, MD, PhD, and Steve Landas, MD, explore which drugs will work best in each patient. Megan Oest, PhD, investigates how to better protect bone from radiation therapy. Debashis Ghosh, PhD, explains the best way to inhibit estrogen. Christopher Turner, PhD, and Nicholas Deakin, PhD, search for ways to halt the spread of breast cancer.


Changes in perception among rural medicine students

Thursday, October 9th, 2014

Carrie RoseameliaCarrie Roseamelia tells us about Upstate Medical University’s Rural Medical Education (RMED) program, and what the clinical experiences mean for medical students. She also describes a student photo research project where medical students and physician assistant students from Upstate’s College of Health Professions, captured their experiences through photos and vignettes. Roseamelia is the administrative coordinator of the RMED program at Upstate Medical University.
Read the story: Upstate study looks at interactions between rural setting and the clinical training experiences of RMED students.


New dangers: e-cigarette cartridges, and heroin-laced oxycontin

Thursday, October 9th, 2014

Michele CalivaMichele Caliva, RN, administrative director of the Upstate New York Poison Center at Upstate Medical University, shares the newest dangers related to e-cigarette cartridges, and heroin-laced oxycontin. Read more: combatheroin.ny.org


Epilepsy in older adults

Thursday, October 9th, 2014

Rebecca O'Dwyer, MDNeurologist Rebecca O’Dwyer, MD, talks about the increase in prevalence of epilepsy among older adults, and how symptoms in the elderly are often not recognized as seizures and thus treated incorrectly. O’Dwyer is a clinical instructor and epilepsy fellow in the Department of Neurology at Upstate Medical University. For more information, call 315 464-4243 and ask for Dr. O’Dwyer.


Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

Thursday, October 9th, 2014

Prateek D Wali, MDPediatric gastroenterologist Prateek Wali, MD, explains the basics of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children – who is affected, what are the causes, how it’s diagnosed and treated, and what Upstate has to offer. Wali is assistant professor of Pediatrics and interim division chief of Gastroenterology and Nutrition at Upstate Medical University.  Read more: GI Kids,and Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America


Check-Up From The Neck-Up: Making a plan for when the mad dog lunges

Thursday, October 9th, 2014

Richard O'Neill, PhD Psychologist Richard O’Neill explains that even when you try to make a plan for stressful situations, it doesn’t always work!

Watch O’Neill on YouTube!
Suggest a Topic!
Check-up from the Neck Up Podcast Archives

Read more about The Institute for Decision Excellence & Leadership


HealthLink On Air radio show: Oct. 12, 2014

Tuesday, October 7th, 2014

HealthLink on Air radio show Drs. Jerrold Abraham and Michael Lax answer whether your job can give you cancer. Dr. Harold Smulyan shares his research into the death of President Warren Harding. Microbiologist Gary Chan, PhD discusses his research into the effects of human cytomegalovirus infection, also known as HCM.


Which drug will work best in each breast cancer patient?

Thursday, October 2nd, 2014

Steve K Landas, MDLeszek Kotula, MD/PhD

A family of molecules known as the Wave Complex interact within our cells. Which molecular family members are present at any given time in the life of a cell determines how that cell will behave: how it gets nutrition, whether and how it moves, whether it remains stationery.

 This complex appears to play a major role in the invasive types of breast cancer, says Leszek Kotula, PhD, associate professor of urology and biochemistry and molecular biology. Working on the theory that the Wave Complex could be a target for therapy are Kotula and two colleagues, Steve Landas, MD, professor of pathology and urology, and Mira Krendel, PhD, assistant professor of cell and developmental biology.

When they increase some specific molecules in the complex, the cancer spreads, Kotula says. He adds that by decreasing certain molecules, “we may actually stop metastasis, or greatly affect it.”

The next step will be to test the effects of existing cancer drugs on these molecules. Landas, a diagnostic pathologist for 35 years, sees the potential. “Wouldn’t it be a wonderful thing if we find ourselves in a situation where we can look at certain members of this family of molecules and know with a high degree of certainty which drugs will work and which will not?”

Kotula and Landas are among dozens of researchers who have received grants from the Carol M. Baldwin Breast Cancer Research Fund of CNY since 2002.


Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)

Thursday, October 2nd, 2014

Gary C Chan, PhDMicrobiologist Gary Chan, PhD discusses his research into the effects of human cytomegalovirus infection, also known as HCMV – a herpes virus, on monocyte cell survival. Chan is assistant professor of microbiology and immunology at Upstate Medical University, and recently received a $402,500 grant from National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases for the project.


A visit from the healing muse: ‘The Race’

Thursday, October 2nd, 2014

Deirdre Neilen, PhDDeirdre Neilen, PhD shares a selection from Upstate’s literary journal, “The Healing Muse” every Sunday on HealthLink on Air. Neilen is the editor of the annual publication featuring fiction, poetry, essays and visual art focused on themes of medicine, illness, disability and healing. Read The Healing Muse Cafe Blog.

Today’s selection is ’The Race, by Kathleen Grieger, and can be found in the The Healing Muse, Volume 9. Order your copy of “The Healing Muse” today!


What will stop the spread of breast cancer?

Wednesday, October 1st, 2014

Christopher E Turner, PhDNicholas Deakin

The protein, paxillin plays an important role in cell movement. What scientists are trying to determine is exactly how paxillin affects the movement of cancer cells away from a primary tumor, into the blood stream and on to colonize distant organs. It’s important to know because “If we can develop ways in which we can limit paxillin’s function, we may be able to block the process of metastasis,” says Christopher Turner, PhD, professor of cell and developmental biology.

 Many of the drugs used to fight breast cancer tumors target microtubules, the proteins that makes up the cytoskeleton that helps cells maintain their shape and internal organization. These drugs create toxic side effects for patients.

“We found that the level of expression of paxillin in tumor cells may actually influence the microtubule cytoskeleton and, therefore, may influence how those drugs actually work in individual patients,” Turner says.

Nicholas Deakin, PhD, research assistant professor of cell and developmental biology, points out that the deaths of 95 percent of the 40,000 American women who die from breast cancer each year are linked to metastasis. “It’s not the tumor in the breast that really is the problem. It’s the ability of the cells to move away from there,” he explains. “If we can detect the tumors early, and if we can then treat them with a drug or know what drug to go with to stop their spread, then that’s going to greatly influence the survival of these patients.”

Turner and Deakin are among dozens of researchers who have received grants from the Carol M. Baldwin Breast Cancer Research Fund of CNY since 2002.