Archive Posts

Archive for the ‘ Upstate Medical University/University Hospital’ Category

HealthLink on Air radio show: February 14, 2016

Thursday, February 11th, 2016

February 14, 2016

Upstate radiologist Santiago Miro, MD, tells what’s new in lung cancer screening on this week’s show. Then, Connie Gregory and Aldrine Ashong-Katai tell about a partnership that aims to improve health disparities in public housing neighborhoods, and Upstate pediatric anesthesiologist Joseph Resti, MD, goes over what to expect when a baby or older child faces surgery.

Play

Upstate trains advocates to spread healthy messages through neighborhoods

Thursday, February 4th, 2016

Through a partnership with the Syracuse Housing Authority, Upstate is helping to reduce health disparities in public housing neighborhoods. Connie Gregory (at right) and Aldrine Ashong-Katai explain how resident health advocates are trained in important chronic health and social conditions and asked to share the information with their neighbors. “People are more apt to listen to people they can relate to,” explains Ashong-Katai. He and Gregory work in Upstate’s office of diversity and inclusion.

Play

New guidelines say children should be screened for high cholesterol

Thursday, February 4th, 2016

Children between age 9 and 11, and again between 18 and 21, should have their cholesterol checked through a blood test, according to new guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics. Testing previously was reserved for children whose families included a history of high cholesterol, explains Upstate pediatrician Travis Hobart, MD. Now the strategy is to identify cholesterol problems early to allow time to intervene. “Children with high cholesterol are much more likely to become adults with a bad cholesterol profile,” he says.

Play

Health insurers now pay for lung cancer screening for smokers, former smokers

Thursday, February 4th, 2016

Low-dose computerized tomography scans can help locate lung cancers at the earliest, most treatable stages, says Upstate radiologist Santiago Miro, MD. He tells about the lung cancer screening program at Upstate (call 1-800-464-8668 for an appointment) which is now covered by most health insurance plans. It’s designed for people between the ages of 55 and 77 who have smoked what is known as “30 pack years.” That’s a pack a day for 30 years, or two packs a day for 15 years, or other variations. The testing is also for people who quit smoking within the last 15 years. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States.

Play

HealthLink on Air radio show: February 7, 2016

Thursday, February 4th, 2016

February 7, 2016

Upstate registered dietitian nutritionists Carrie Carlton and Cecilia Sansone talk about nutrition in older adults. Upstate pediatrician Travis Hobart, MD, discusses the new cholesterol screening guidelines for children. Syracuse University professor Amy Ellen Schwartz, PhD, addresses obesity and nutrition in schoolchildren.

Play

HealthLink on Air radio show: January 31, 2016

Friday, January 29th, 2016

January 31, 2016

Upstate urologist Gennady Bratslavsky, MD, joins his patient Erica Searles in telling about a delicate operation to remove a tumor while preserving her adrenal gland. Upstate pediatric rheumatologist Caitlin Sgarlat, DO, and pediatric infectious disease expert Jana Shaw, MD, discuss the diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease.

Play

HealthLink on Air radio show: January 24, 2016

Wednesday, January 20th, 2016

January 24, 2016

Registered nurse Deb Polmanteer talks about treatment and options for someone with chronic kidney disease. Upstate urologist Dmitriy Nikolavsky, MD, shares his expertise in surgical repair after gender reassignment surgery, and author Terri Cook tells about the memoir she wrote with her husband about their child’s transition. Syracuse University registered dietitian Tanya Horacek, PhD, explores the factors that influence college student weight gain.

Play

Varied menu, sufficient fluids important in senior citizen diets

Wednesday, January 20th, 2016

Ensuring proper nutrition for senior citizens involves looking at changes in both body and lifestyle, say two registered dietitian nutritionists at Upstate. Decreases in muscle mass, bone density and the sense of smell, coupled with physical illness or depression, contribute to diminished appetite and calories needed, say Carrie Carlton (at right in photo) and Cecilia Sansone. Among their prescriptions are a varied diet of nutrient-rich foods tailored to the individual, sufficient fluids and several small meals as an alternative to three main meals.

Play

Patient story: Surgery removes tumor while preserving adrenal gland

Wednesday, January 20th, 2016

On top of each kidney sits an adrenal gland, which produces hormones a person cannot live without. When a tumor develops in an adrenal gland, the patient may face the removal of the entire gland and, if tumors were to also develop in the remaining gland, the reliance on medications for the rest of his or her life. So Erica Searles (at right in photo, with Gennady Bratslavsky, MD) appreciated the option presented by Gennady Bratslavsky, MD, who leads the department of urology at Upstate. He removed a tumor but preserved Searles’ adrenal gland in a minimally invasive operation. In this interview, the patient describes how she learned she had a tumor, and Bratslavsky tells about the surgery, called a partial adrenalectomy.

Play

Here’s how Lyme disease is diagnosed and treated

Wednesday, January 20th, 2016

Lyme disease is treated successfully with a short course of antibiotics in most cases, but prevention is the key to controlling the disease, say two experts from Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital. Since the bacterial infection is transmitted to humans by deer ticks, people should wear long sleeves and pants when outdoors even in warm weather, as well as check their skin afterward, say Caitlin Sgarlat, DO (at left in photo, with program host Linda Cohen at center, and Jana Shaw, MD), who specializes in rheumatology and integrative medicine, and Jana Shaw, MD, who specializes in infectious diseases. They explain how quick and careful removal of ticks prevents transmission of the disease and why they advise against the long-term use of antibiotics for Lyme disease patients with lingering problems after treatment. They also explain how the disease is diagnosed and its typical symptoms.

Play

HealthLink on Air radio show: January 17, 2016

Friday, January 15th, 2016

January 17, 2016

Stephen Graziano, MD, Upstate’s division chief of hematology and oncology, shares what’s new in precision medicine. Upstate’s transplant division chief, Rainer Gruessner, MD, explains how pancreas transplants may help some diabetics. And Upstate’s chief nursing officer, Nancy Page, and nurse practitioner Archie McEvers talk about the pursuit of higher levels of training.

Play

Demand for additional training by nurses driven by many factors

Thursday, January 14th, 2016

Nurses today are likely to have more training and to seek further training than their counterparts a generation ago, say Upstate’s chief nursing officer, Nancy Page, RN (pictured, right), and clinical coordinator for palliative care, Archie McEvers, NP. The nursing profession recognized that higher levels of training brought higher skill levels and better patient care, Page says. Today’s shorter hospital stays and advances in technology demand nurses with ever higher levels of education and efficiency, so the incentive for additional training will continue, McEvers adds.

Play