Archive Posts

Archive for the ‘ technology’ Category

A historical look at a heart condition caused by infection

Thursday, December 17th, 2015

A cardiologist (Harold Smulyan, MD, left) and an infectious disease expert (Donald Blair, MD) from Upstate look at the history of infective endocarditis — an inflammation of the inner lining of the heart and its tissues, usually caused by a bacterial infection — in a paper published in the American Journal of the Medical Sciences. The disease was first reported in the early 1800s, and Smulyan explains that “before the development of antibiotics, this disease was uniformly fatal.” His research identifies a number of famous patients who died from infective endocarditis, including Scottish poet Robert Burns in 1796; composer Gustay Mahler in 1907; German physician Alois Alzheimer, the founding father of neuropathology, in 1915; and silent-screen star Rudolph Valentino in 1926.

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Check Up from the Neck Up: Keeping TV out of the background helps keep family in the foreground

Thursday, October 1st, 2015

Psychologist Rich O’Neill, PhD, talks about research from the University of Massachusetts that shows parents spend less time engaged with their children when a television is turned on in the same room.

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How latest techniques help surgeons fight cancer, other diseases of liver, pancreas, gallbladder

Wednesday, August 12th, 2015

Ajay Jain, MDObesity and drug abuse can lead to fatty liver and hepatitis C, which are major factors for developing liver cancer, according to Ajay Jain, MD, associate chief of hepatobiliary and pancreatic surgery at Upstate. Jain, who specializes in cancer surgery, describes the latest procedures – often minimally invasive and robotically assisted — to treat cancers and other diseases of the liver, pancreas, gallbladder and bile ducts. He also reviews promising new research on early detection of pancreatic cancer.

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AMA president-elect discusses financial, technological pressures facing doctors

Thursday, July 9th, 2015

Andrew Gurman, MDPreserving the doctor-patient relationship amid a tidal wave of technological changes and economic pressures is a top concern of the new president-elect of the American Medical Association. Andrew Gurman, MD, a graduate of Upstate Medical University who is now a hand surgeon in Pennsylvania, also talks about ways to keep costs and fees reasonable for patients, doctors and medical students and examines trends toward team-based medical care.

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How the artificial pancreas could improve the lives of people with diabetes

Wednesday, March 11th, 2015

Ruth S Weinstock, MD, PhDPeople with Type 1 diabetes would not have to check their blood sugar levels 12 times a day or worry about wild fluctuations while they slept if an experimental bionic pancreas works as designed, according to Ruth Weinstock, MD, medical director of Upstate’s Joslin Diabetes Center. She describes how the pancreas works in this interview. “It’s not a cure, but it’s definitely a step forward.” For details on participating in research at Joslin, please call 315-464-9007.

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Meet the Mako robot

Friday, October 31st, 2014

Robert Sherman, MDRobert Sherman, MD, tells about Upstate University Hospital’s new robotic tool that assists in hip and knee replacement surgeries.

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‘Expert Advice’: How to move a new medical idea forward

Thursday, September 18th, 2014

Robert J Corona Jr, DO,MBARobert Corona, DO, explains how the new Upstate MIND center will help transform innovative ideas in the medical field into useful, tangible ways to improve the human condition and the delivery of health care. In addition to leading the center, Corona is professor and chair of pathology at Upstate Medical University.

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HealthLink On Air radio show: July 27, 2014

Tuesday, July 22nd, 2014

HealthLink on Air radio showTraian Anghel, MD, and Amy Tetrault, RN, tell about the new implantable cardiac defibrillator. Palma Shaw, MD, discusses deep vein thrombosis. Registered dietitian Maureen Franklin shares summertime food safety advice. Ajay Jain, MD, explains the rise in chronic hepatitis.

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Implantable cardiac defibrillator

Wednesday, July 16th, 2014

Traian Anghel, MDAmy TetraultTraian Anghel, MD is joined by Amy Tetrault, RN, to talk about a new subcutaneous implantable cardiac defibrillator offered at Upstate, that will help regulate abnormal heart rhythms.  Anghel is assistant professor of Medicine at Upstate, and founding partner at the Heart Group of Syracuse, and Tetrault is the associate director, Upstate Heart and Vascular Center.

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Upstate researcher wins $50K state grant to develop medical device

Wednesday, June 25th, 2014

Gary NiemanUpstate researcher Gary Nieman, MS, has been awarded a $50,000 grant from the SUNY Technology Accelerator Fund (TAF) to develop a Minimally-invasive Infusion and Suction Therapy (MIST), a novel medical device that removes harmful abdominal fluid buildup caused by trauma, sepsis, or burns. Nieman is associate professor of surgery, senior research scientist, and director of the Cardiopulmonary and Critical Care Lab at Upstate Medical University. 

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New center for innovation at Upstate

Wednesday, April 9th, 2014

Robert J Corona Jr, DO,MBARobert Corona, DO, discusses the new innovation center at Upstate — Upstate MIND (Medical Innovation and Novel Discovery) — designed to transform innovative ideas into useful, tangible ways to improve the human condition and the delivery of health care. Corona leads the center in the newly created position of vice president for Innovation and Business Development, and continues as professor and chair of Upstate’s Pathology Department.  To discuss your innovative idea or to discuss business partnership opportunities, contact Corona at coronar@upstate.edu or Kathy Pazaras at 315-464-9288.

Read the story: Upstate MIND is focused on innovation

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‘Expert Advice’: Your personal health information

Friday, March 7th, 2014

Upstate University Hospital chief medical information officer Neal Seidberg, MD, talks about a new era of technology where people are using wearable devices such as Fitbit™ to track daily activities and calories burned.  Seidberg says this type of personal information, if desired, may some day be shared directly with your healthcare provider’s electronic medical records.

Upstate’s electronic medical records system, called MyChart, is a secure, password protected account accessible exclusively to the patient, that allows them to securely access test results, request prescripton renewals, view recent clinic visits and request appointments.  For more information, visit mychart.upstate.edu, FAQ’s or call our MyChart Patient Support Line at 1-800-231-6899.  Read the “What’s Up At Upstate” blog: Why electronic medical records are good for patients

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