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Archive for the ‘ technology’ Category

Aiming for total wellness; Cancer Moonshot’s ambitious goals; missionary nursing’s lessons: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, Sept. 4, 2016

Wednesday, August 31st, 2016

Sept. 4, 2016

Upstate’s director of integrative medicine, Kaushal Nanavati, MD, explains how to find your path to total wellness. Upstate urologist and cancer researcher Leszek Kotula, MD, PhD discusses the wide-reaching Cancer Moonshot initiative. Victoria Okhman, a pediatric nurse at the Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital, shares her experiences as a missionary nurse in Russia.

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Zika virus update; integrative treatment for diabetes; ear infections explained: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, Aug. 28, 2016

Thursday, August 25th, 2016

Aug. 28, 2016

Infectious disease expert Mark Polhemus, MD, provides an update on the Zika virus threat. Haidy Marzouk, MD, goes over pediatric ear infections. Barbara Feuerstein, MD, talks about an integrative approach to diabetes and wellness.

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Trauma unit’s specialists ready to treat youngest patients

Thursday, August 25th, 2016

A team of pediatric specialists treats the wide range of trauma that children encounter, says Kim Wallenstein, MD, the new medical director of Upstate’s pediatric trauma unit. Wallenstein, a pediatric surgeon, explains how children who have been injured by anything from bicycle accidents to gunshot wounds are brought in and treated at the only level-one pediatric trauma center in Upstate New York.

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Cancer Moonshot a wide-reaching effort to fight the disease

Thursday, August 25th, 2016

The Cancer Moonshot initiative aims to accelerate, coordinate and improve the understanding, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer. It would involve patients, doctors, drug companies and almost anyone involved with cancer, explains Upstate urologist and cancer researcher Leszek Kotula, MD, PhD. Among its goals are improving the sharing of information, speeding up the approval of new drugs, funding more research and improving access to care for underserved groups, he says.

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Less-invasive urinary tract surgery; treating rotator cuff, other shoulder injuries; researching diabetes remedies: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, Aug. 21, 2016

Friday, August 19th, 2016

Urologists Dmitriy Nikolavsky, MD, and Jonathan Riddell, MD, talk about surgical innovations to correct problems with the urinary tract in men, women and children. Orthopedic surgeon L. Ryan Smart, MD, discusses common shoulder injuries and their treatment. Ruth Weinstock, MD, PhD, tells about research that is shaping the way diabetes is managed.

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Research offers glimpse into future of diabetes treatments

Friday, August 19th, 2016

Research taking place at Upstate’s Joslin Diabetes Center offers the potential for huge advances in diabetes treatment, says Ruth Weinstock, MD, PhD, Upstate’s chief of endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism. She describes the clinical trials, one of which would create an artificial pancreas by having a blood glucose sensor signal an insulin pump to maintain blood sugar levels automatically. Another looks at whether a gout drug could also protect the kidneys from diabetes damage. People with diabetes or their close relatives who wish to participate in research projects may call 315-464-9007 for more information.

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New techniques for urinary tract surgery are less invasive

Thursday, August 11th, 2016

A variety of new reconstructive and minimally invasive treatments are being used to correct problems with the urinary tract in men, women and children. Upstate urologist Dmitriy Nikolavsky, MD (at left in photo), describes how he created a surgical procedure to restore a damaged urethra – the tube through which urine leaves the body – using a patient’s own tissue and avoiding the need for a tube implant. Jonathan Riddell, MD (at right), a pediatric urologist at Upstate, tells how he uses a minimally invasive robotic surgery system to correct urinary tube problems without large incisions or long hospital stays, how Botox injections help control bladder incontinence and how urinary problems can be diagnosed, and treated, before birth. Research points to a future where restorative grafting will be done in innovative and ever less invasive ways, Nikolavsky says.

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Paramedic, doctor tell about working for TV wilderness adventure show

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

A love of the wilderness led a paramedic and a doctor to work with the National Geographic Channel adventure series “The Great Human Race.” Todd Curtis (at left in photo), a paramedic who trained at Upstate and now teaches at Upstate, served as medical safety oversight director for the show, which follows two people as they re-create the conditions of early humans in remote locales in Ethiopia, Mongolia and elsewhere. Curtis got long-distance supervision from emergency physician Jeremy Joslin, MD (at right in photo), director of Upstate’s wilderness and expedition medicine program. They describe the challenges of preparing for medical emergencies in remote places.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: April 17, 2016

Thursday, April 14th, 2016

April 17, 2016

Urologist Oleg Shapiro, MD, discusses kidney cancer. Nurses Lorrie Langdon and Michelle Vallelunga tell about atrial fibrillation and its connection to stroke. Wikipedian Lane Rasberry talks about the medical information available at the online encyclopedia.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: March 13, 2016

Wednesday, March 9th, 2016

March 13, 2016

Transfusion expert Matthew Elkins, MD, PhD, discusses bone marrow transplant. Neurosciences doctoral student Patrick Sweeney talks of the connection between emotion, genetics and eating patterns. Radiologist Ravi Adhikary, MD, and radiology director Jennifer Caldwell tell about the merits of 3-D mammography.

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3-D mammography holds promise of better imaging, early breast cancer detection

Friday, March 4th, 2016

A 3-D mammogram – similar to a CT scan – is becoming the new standard in breast cancer screening, experts at Upstate say. Multiple images from various angles can allow a better view into a breast, especially a dense breast, than traditional two-dimensional mammograms, say radiologist Ravi Adhikary, MD, director of the women’s imaging section, and Jennifer Caldwell, director of radiology. While 3-D mammograms are done in addition to 2-D now, in the future, just the 3-D version — with a 2-D version reconstructed from it — will likely be used. This will reduce radiation exposure and discomfort, should reduce false positives and, it is hoped, increase early detection of breast cancer, Adhikary says.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: Jan. 3, 2016

Saturday, January 2nd, 2016

January 3, 2016

Upstate cardiologist Harold Smulyan, MD, and infectious disease expert Donald Blair, MD, take a historical look at a deadly heart infection. Upstate assistant vice president Thomas Pelis shares how big institutions, such as Upstate Medical University, are going green. Bioethics and humanities assistant professor Thomas Curran, MD, and associate professor Robert Olick, JD, PhD, discuss the importance of the health care proxy.

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