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Archive for the ‘ surgery’ Category

Living kidney donors greatly needed

Wednesday, July 27th, 2016

The need for living kidney donors is growing, partly because people are living longer on dialysis, explains Vaughn Whittaker, MD, a transplant surgeon at Upstate. Everyone has two kidneys and can live with just one, and a kidney from a live donor tends to be of higher quality, he says. While some people fear live donation, Whittaker explains the safety factors and support system that let almost any healthy adult donate, as well as  breakthroughs like the ability to donate to someone with an incompatible blood type. Questions about kidney donation may be made to Upstate’s transplant clinic at 464-5413.

 

 

 

 

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Mild cognitive impairment, Zika virus, pancreas transplant recipients: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for July 17, 2016

Friday, July 15th, 2016

July 17, 2016

Neurologist Amy Sanders, MD, explains mild cognitive impairment. Infectious disease specialist Timothy Endy, MD, tells about the Zika virus. Two pancreas transplant recipients share their experiences with diabetes and kidney disease.

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Pancreas recipients overjoyed at prospect of life without diabetes

Thursday, July 14th, 2016

For the first time in their lives, Patrick Nolan, 52 (at left in photo), and Harry Tynan, 39 (at right), are doing what most people take for granted: living without having to constantly check their blood sugar or inject insulin. Each man was diagnosed as a child with Type 1 diabetes and has spent his life dealing with the disease and the kidney damage it can cause. Each man has also received a kidney transplant, and each recently received a transplanted pancreas at Upstate, in effect curing their diabetes. “I’m reliving my youth again. … I just wake up and go, ‘Wow!’“ says Nolan of Syracuse. “It’s a complete change just to look forward and not have to do injections,” notes Tynan of Oswego. “I’m ready to pick up the insulin pen, and I don’t have to.”

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Pancreas transplant an option for people with severe diabetes

Friday, July 8th, 2016

Upstate doctors are now offering a pancreas transplant option for some patients with diabetes, the most common cause of kidney failure. A pancreas transplant may be a proactive way for many with diabetes, especially the more severe cases, to avoid kidney failure, says Rainer Gruessner, MD (at right in photo), Upstate’s transplant chief and professor of surgery. His colleague, surgeon Mark Reza Laftavi, MD (at left), director of Upstate’s Pancreas Transplant Program, describes the dangers diabetes poses to the kidneys and other organs. Gruessner and his team offer pancreas transplants — separately or combined with kidney transplants — and says a pancreas transplant can improve the lives of some patients with diabetes and also halt or reverse some complications. For pancreas transplants, a deceased donor’s organ is implanted in the recipient, who retains his or her original pancreas, which continues to produce digestive enzymes. The new pancreas immediately begins producing insulin.

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Pancreas transplants, preventing drowning, breast cancer/prostate cancer link: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for July 10, 2016

Friday, July 8th, 2016

July 10, 2016

Transplant surgeons Rainer Gruessner, MD, and Mark Laftavi, MD, discuss the pancreas transplant program. Pediatrician Robert Newmyer, MD, talks about drowning and water safety. Urologist Srinivas Vourganti, MD, tells how the “breast cancer gene” increases a man’s risk of prostate cancer.

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Bariatric surgeon explains why diet, exercise not enough to help people with morbid obesity

Thursday, June 16th, 2016

The idea that a morbidly obese person can achieve a healthy weight through willpower alone is outdated, according to Howard Simon, MD, director of bariatric surgery at Upstate. People with morbid obesity (with a body mass index above 40) have a metabolic disease too complicated to treat with just drugs, diet or exercise, he says, and most will regain weight lost through those methods. He explains why bariatric surgery, combined with behavioral changes, has a high rate of long-term success. 

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Surgery for weight loss; health impact of poverty, violence; caring for those with dementia: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for June 19, 2016

Thursday, June 16th, 2016

June 19, 2016

Surgeon Howard Simon, MD, discusses the connection between weight loss and metabolism, and the effect surgery can have for people with morbid obesity. Researchers Sandra Lane, PhD, and Arnett Haygood-El talk about the impact of poverty and violence on health. Geriatric resource nurses Kaylin Brainerd and Linh Nguyen provide guidance to caregivers of people with dementia.

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Doctor, patient, foundation offer views on pain, treatment of pancreatic disease

Thursday, June 2nd, 2016

Diseases of the pancreas, such as pancreatitis, can bring debilitating pain and sometimes lead to cancer. Nuri Ozden, MD (at left), an interventional gastroenterologist at Upstate, discusses the function of the pancreas and diseases that affect it, and he previews Upstate’s planned islet transplant program. One of his patients, Jane Cross (at right), offers a personal view of pancreas disease. She chairs the New York State Chapter of the National Pancreas Foundation, which has recognized Upstate as one of only two hospitals in the state to provide comprehensive, multidisciplinary care for pancreas patients.

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HealthLink on Air radio show/podcast: June 5, 2016

Thursday, June 2nd, 2016

June 5, 2016

Gastroenterologist Nuri Ozden, MD, and Jane Cross, chapter chair for the National Pancreas Foundation, tell about multidisciplinary care for people with pancreatitis. Physical therapist Karen Kemmis provides steps to better bone health. Editor Deirdre Neilen, PhD, shares the new edition of The Healing Muse literary journal.

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HealthLink on Air radio show/podcast: May 29, 2016

Wednesday, May 25th, 2016

May 29, 2016

Vascular surgeon Michael Costanza, MD, goes over the importance of screening for vascular diseases. Research scientist Stephen Glatt, PhD, discusses the genetic epidemiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. Meaghan Greeley and Tiffany Brec from Vera House talk about strategies for stopping sexual violence.

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How vascular disease can lead to muscle problems, heart attacks, strokes

Thursday, May 12th, 2016

Vascular disease, or diseases of the blood vessels, can lead to difficulty walking, heart attacks, strokes and gangrene, explains Upstate vascular surgeon Michael Costanza, MD. Changes in lifestyle habits often help: Don’t smoke, get reasonable exercise, follow a healthy diet, and control any problems with diabetes, cholesterol or blood pressure. Costanza also addressed how vascular disease is diagnosed, who is likely to get it and the importance of screening.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: May 15, 2016

Thursday, May 12th, 2016

May 15, 2016

Upstate surgeon Scott Albert, MD, explains the new way of thinking about thyroid cancer. Upstate toxicologist William Eggleston tells of the dangers of hydrocarbons and commonly abused medications. Support group facilitator Christine Kowaleski discusses postpartum depression and psychosis with Central New York mother Heather Sherman.

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