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Archive for the ‘ surgery’ Category

Ear infections related to how children develop

Thursday, August 25th, 2016

Ear infections are common in the first few years of life, partly due to how the ear’s eustachian tube develops, explains Haidy Marzouk, MD, an Upstate ear, nose and throat specialist. The tube’s horizontal position make it prone to blockage and fluid buildup, she says, but after age 3 or so, as the tube becomes more vertical, the ear infections become less frequent. She also explains treatment, the use of antibiotics and extreme cases.

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Trauma unit’s specialists ready to treat youngest patients

Thursday, August 25th, 2016

A team of pediatric specialists treats the wide range of trauma that children encounter, says Kim Wallenstein, MD, the new medical director of Upstate’s pediatric trauma unit. Wallenstein, a pediatric surgeon, explains how children who have been injured by anything from bicycle accidents to gunshot wounds are brought in and treated at the only level-one pediatric trauma center in Upstate New York.

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Less-invasive urinary tract surgery; treating rotator cuff, other shoulder injuries; researching diabetes remedies: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, Aug. 21, 2016

Friday, August 19th, 2016

Urologists Dmitriy Nikolavsky, MD, and Jonathan Riddell, MD, talk about surgical innovations to correct problems with the urinary tract in men, women and children. Orthopedic surgeon L. Ryan Smart, MD, discusses common shoulder injuries and their treatment. Ruth Weinstock, MD, PhD, tells about research that is shaping the way diabetes is managed.

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Conservative treatment often resolves rotator cuff injury, a common shoulder problem

Thursday, August 11th, 2016

Shoulder injuries are common, since the joint is used so much in daily life, and orthopedic surgeons have a variety of ways to treat such injuries, explains L. Ryan Smart, MD, a member of Syracuse Orthopedic Specialists and the Upstate Community Campus Orthopedics Group. He describes the structure of the shoulder and focuses on rotator cuff injury, a common problem that often strikes people who use their shoulders repeatedly, such as carpenters, weightlifters and tennis players. Rotator cuff injuries can often be resolved conservatively with drugs to combat the inflammation, and with surgery if that fails. Smart also touches on frozen shoulder, the role of age and family history, the surgical recovery period, shoulder replacement and new medications on the horizon.

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New techniques for urinary tract surgery are less invasive

Thursday, August 11th, 2016

A variety of new reconstructive and minimally invasive treatments are being used to correct problems with the urinary tract in men, women and children. Upstate urologist Dmitriy Nikolavsky, MD (at left in photo), describes how he created a surgical procedure to restore a damaged urethra – the tube through which urine leaves the body – using a patient’s own tissue and avoiding the need for a tube implant. Jonathan Riddell, MD (at right), a pediatric urologist at Upstate, tells how he uses a minimally invasive robotic surgery system to correct urinary tube problems without large incisions or long hospital stays, how Botox injections help control bladder incontinence and how urinary problems can be diagnosed, and treated, before birth. Research points to a future where restorative grafting will be done in innovative and ever less invasive ways, Nikolavsky says.

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Donating one of her kidneys to a stranger; how living donors save lives; a whole-person approach to kicking opioid addiction: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, Aug. 7, 2016

Thursday, August 4th, 2016

Upstate University Hospital nurse Jody Adams tells why she donated one of her kidneys to a woman she had never met. Upstate transplant surgeon Vaughn Whittaker, MD, explains how such kidney donations are saving and improving lives. Upstate psychiatrist Brian Johnson, MD, discusses a holistic treatment for opioid addiction.

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Facebook plea inspires Upstate nurse to donate kidney to stranger

Thursday, August 4th, 2016

Victoria Fitzpatrick holds her baby, Carter, as she talks about receiving a new kidney from Upstate nurse Jody Adams (right). (PHOTO BY WILLIAM MUELLER)

Upstate University Hospital nurse Jody Adams talks about her decision to donate one of her healthy kidneys to a woman she had never met in what transplant team members refer to as an altruistic kidney donation. Adams learned about Victoria Fitzpatrick’s need for a kidney through a Facebook post, written as if it came from Fitzpatrick’s new baby, Carter. Transplant surgeons Rainer Gruessner, MD, and Vaughn Whittaker, MD, explain how people need just one kidney to live, and how donating a healthy kidney can enhance the life of someone whose kidneys have stopped functioning properly. Dozens of people who saw the same Facebook post contacted the transplant team at Upstate to see if they were a match. At least one decided to donate one of her kidneys to another patient on the transplant waiting list.

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Living kidney donors greatly needed

Wednesday, July 27th, 2016

The need for living kidney donors is growing, partly because people are living longer on dialysis, explains Vaughn Whittaker, MD, a transplant surgeon at Upstate. Everyone has two kidneys and can live with just one, and a kidney from a live donor tends to be of higher quality, he says. While some people fear live donation, Whittaker explains the safety factors and support system that let almost any healthy adult donate, as well as  breakthroughs like the ability to donate to someone with an incompatible blood type. Questions about kidney donation may be made to Upstate’s transplant clinic at 464-5413.

 

 

 

 

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Mild cognitive impairment, Zika virus, pancreas transplant recipients: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for July 17, 2016

Friday, July 15th, 2016

July 17, 2016

Neurologist Amy Sanders, MD, explains mild cognitive impairment. Infectious disease specialist Timothy Endy, MD, tells about the Zika virus. Two pancreas transplant recipients share their experiences with diabetes and kidney disease.

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Pancreas recipients overjoyed at prospect of life without diabetes

Thursday, July 14th, 2016

For the first time in their lives, Patrick Nolan, 52 (at left in photo), and Harry Tynan, 39 (at right), are doing what most people take for granted: living without having to constantly check their blood sugar or inject insulin. Each man was diagnosed as a child with Type 1 diabetes and has spent his life dealing with the disease and the kidney damage it can cause. Each man has also received a kidney transplant, and each recently received a transplanted pancreas at Upstate, in effect curing their diabetes. “I’m reliving my youth again. … I just wake up and go, ‘Wow!’“ says Nolan of Syracuse. “It’s a complete change just to look forward and not have to do injections,” notes Tynan of Oswego. “I’m ready to pick up the insulin pen, and I don’t have to.”

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Pancreas transplant an option for people with severe diabetes

Friday, July 8th, 2016

Upstate doctors are now offering a pancreas transplant option for some patients with diabetes, the most common cause of kidney failure. A pancreas transplant may be a proactive way for many with diabetes, especially the more severe cases, to avoid kidney failure, says Rainer Gruessner, MD (at right in photo), Upstate’s transplant chief and professor of surgery. His colleague, surgeon Mark Reza Laftavi, MD (at left), director of Upstate’s Pancreas Transplant Program, describes the dangers diabetes poses to the kidneys and other organs. Gruessner and his team offer pancreas transplants — separately or combined with kidney transplants — and says a pancreas transplant can improve the lives of some patients with diabetes and also halt or reverse some complications. For pancreas transplants, a deceased donor’s organ is implanted in the recipient, who retains his or her original pancreas, which continues to produce digestive enzymes. The new pancreas immediately begins producing insulin.

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Pancreas transplants, preventing drowning, breast cancer/prostate cancer link: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for July 10, 2016

Friday, July 8th, 2016

July 10, 2016

Transplant surgeons Rainer Gruessner, MD, and Mark Laftavi, MD, discuss the pancreas transplant program. Pediatrician Robert Newmyer, MD, talks about drowning and water safety. Urologist Srinivas Vourganti, MD, tells how the “breast cancer gene” increases a man’s risk of prostate cancer.

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