Archive Posts

Archive for the ‘ surgery’ Category

Bariatric surgeon explains why diet, exercise not enough to help people with morbid obesity

Thursday, June 16th, 2016

The idea that a morbidly obese person can achieve a healthy weight through willpower alone is outdated, according to Howard Simon, MD, director of bariatric surgery at Upstate. People with morbid obesity (with a body mass index above 40) have a metabolic disease too complicated to treat with just drugs, diet or exercise, he says, and most will regain weight lost through those methods. He explains why bariatric surgery, combined with behavioral changes, has a high rate of long-term success. 

Play

Surgery for weight loss; health impact of poverty, violence; caring for those with dementia: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for June 19, 2016

Thursday, June 16th, 2016

June 19, 2016

Surgeon Howard Simon, MD, discusses the connection between weight loss and metabolism, and the effect surgery can have for people with morbid obesity. Researchers Sandra Lane, PhD, and Arnett Haygood-El talk about the impact of poverty and violence on health. Geriatric resource nurses Kaylin Brainerd and Linh Nguyen provide guidance to caregivers of people with dementia.

Play

Doctor, patient, foundation offer views on pain, treatment of pancreatic disease

Thursday, June 2nd, 2016

Diseases of the pancreas, such as pancreatitis, can bring debilitating pain and sometimes lead to cancer. Nuri Ozden, MD (at left), an interventional gastroenterologist at Upstate, discusses the function of the pancreas and diseases that affect it, and he previews Upstate’s planned islet transplant program. One of his patients, Jane Cross (at right), offers a personal view of pancreas disease. She chairs the New York State Chapter of the National Pancreas Foundation, which has recognized Upstate as one of only two hospitals in the state to provide comprehensive, multidisciplinary care for pancreas patients.

Play

HealthLink on Air radio show/podcast: June 5, 2016

Thursday, June 2nd, 2016

June 5, 2016

Gastroenterologist Nuri Ozden, MD, and Jane Cross, chapter chair for the National Pancreas Foundation, tell about multidisciplinary care for people with pancreatitis. Physical therapist Karen Kemmis provides steps to better bone health. Editor Deirdre Neilen, PhD, shares the new edition of The Healing Muse literary journal.

Play

HealthLink on Air radio show/podcast: May 29, 2016

Wednesday, May 25th, 2016

May 29, 2016

Vascular surgeon Michael Costanza, MD, goes over the importance of screening for vascular diseases. Research scientist Stephen Glatt, PhD, discusses the genetic epidemiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. Meaghan Greeley and Tiffany Brec from Vera House talk about strategies for stopping sexual violence.

Play

How vascular disease can lead to muscle problems, heart attacks, strokes

Thursday, May 12th, 2016

Vascular disease, or diseases of the blood vessels, can lead to difficulty walking, heart attacks, strokes and gangrene, explains Upstate vascular surgeon Michael Costanza, MD. Changes in lifestyle habits often help: Don’t smoke, get reasonable exercise, follow a healthy diet, and control any problems with diabetes, cholesterol or blood pressure. Costanza also addressed how vascular disease is diagnosed, who is likely to get it and the importance of screening.

Play

HealthLink on Air radio show: May 15, 2016

Thursday, May 12th, 2016

May 15, 2016

Upstate surgeon Scott Albert, MD, explains the new way of thinking about thyroid cancer. Upstate toxicologist William Eggleston tells of the dangers of hydrocarbons and commonly abused medications. Support group facilitator Christine Kowaleski discusses postpartum depression and psychosis with Central New York mother Heather Sherman.

Play

Some thyroid growths might not be cancerous

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

Experts are re-examining whether to consider some slow-growing abnormalities of the thyroid gland as chronic diseases to monitor rather than as cancers to remove immediately, says Scott Albert, MD, division chief of breast, endocrine and plastic surgery at Upstate. Albert also explains the thyroid’s functions, the uses of scans, biopsies and radioactive iodine, and how the vast majority of thyroid cancer patients do well after treatment, which generally involves surgical removal of the gland.

Play

HealthLink on Air radio show: April 24, 2016

Friday, April 22nd, 2016

April 24, 2016

Pediatric urologist Matthew Mason, MD, explains diagnosis and treatment of undescended testicles and other urologic problems that affect babies. Urologist Natasha Ginzburg, MD, discusses pelvic floor disorders affecting women. Urologist JC Trussell, MD, tells about causes and treatments for erectile dysfunction.

Play

Erectile dysfunction is both common and treatable

Thursday, April 14th, 2016

Erectile dysfunction is a common problem that is generally treated with a three-tiered approach, says Upstate urologist JC Trussell, MD. Erectile dysfunction is the persistent inability to achieve or maintain a penile erection for satisfactory sexual performance, Trussell says, and it’s an issue for more men as they get older. He describes the types of ED, contributing factors including stress, diabetes and heart disease, and the usual remedies, starting with medications, then moving to devices if needed, and, as a last option, an implanted prosthesis, all of which have had high rates of success.

Play

Range of options available to treat pelvic floor disorders in women

Thursday, April 14th, 2016

The pelvic floor is a complex structure that can be the source of disorders as women age and bear children, says Natasha Ginzburg, MD, urologist and director of female pelvic medicine and surgery at Upstate. She describes the pelvic floor as a hammock of muscle and tissue that, in women, includes the vagina, rectum and uterus. Problems with urination, defecation and protruding organs in the pelvic floor can be treated successfully through behavioral changes, physical therapy, medicines and biofeedback, with surgery (generally minimally invasive) as a last choice, she said.

Play

Undescended testicle more common in premature baby boys

Thursday, April 14th, 2016

An undescended testicle occurs in about 3 percent of full-term baby boys but in as many as 45 percent of boys born prematurely, explains Matthew Mason, MD, a pediatric urologist at Upstate. The reasons why one testicle (or occasionally both) does not find its way to the scrotum are unclear, he says, noting that pediatricians check for this problem in well-child visits. Mason also describes aspects of the condition and possible complications, such as reduced fertility and testicular cancer, as well as treatment options.

Play