Archive Posts

Archive for the ‘ surgery’ Category

How vascular disease can lead to muscle problems, heart attacks, strokes

Thursday, May 12th, 2016

Vascular disease, or diseases of the blood vessels, can lead to difficulty walking, heart attacks, strokes and gangrene, explains Upstate vascular surgeon Michael Costanza, MD. Changes in lifestyle habits often help: Don’t smoke, get reasonable exercise, follow a healthy diet, and control any problems with diabetes, cholesterol or blood pressure. Costanza also addressed how vascular disease is diagnosed, who is likely to get it and the importance of screening.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: May 15, 2016

Thursday, May 12th, 2016

May 15, 2016

Upstate surgeon Scott Albert, MD, explains the new way of thinking about thyroid cancer. Upstate toxicologist William Eggleston tells of the dangers of hydrocarbons and commonly abused medications. Support group facilitator Christine Kowaleski discusses postpartum depression and psychosis with Central New York mother Heather Sherman.

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Some thyroid growths might not be cancerous

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

Experts are re-examining whether to consider some slow-growing abnormalities of the thyroid gland as chronic diseases to monitor rather than as cancers to remove immediately, says Scott Albert, MD, division chief of breast, endocrine and plastic surgery at Upstate. Albert also explains the thyroid’s functions, the uses of scans, biopsies and radioactive iodine, and how the vast majority of thyroid cancer patients do well after treatment, which generally involves surgical removal of the gland.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: April 24, 2016

Friday, April 22nd, 2016

April 24, 2016

Pediatric urologist Matthew Mason, MD, explains diagnosis and treatment of undescended testicles and other urologic problems that affect babies. Urologist Natasha Ginzburg, MD, discusses pelvic floor disorders affecting women. Urologist JC Trussell, MD, tells about causes and treatments for erectile dysfunction.

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Erectile dysfunction is both common and treatable

Thursday, April 14th, 2016

Erectile dysfunction is a common problem that is generally treated with a three-tiered approach, says Upstate urologist JC Trussell, MD. Erectile dysfunction is the persistent inability to achieve or maintain a penile erection for satisfactory sexual performance, Trussell says, and it’s an issue for more men as they get older. He describes the types of ED, contributing factors including stress, diabetes and heart disease, and the usual remedies, starting with medications, then moving to devices if needed, and, as a last option, an implanted prosthesis, all of which have had high rates of success.

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Range of options available to treat pelvic floor disorders in women

Thursday, April 14th, 2016

The pelvic floor is a complex structure that can be the source of disorders as women age and bear children, says Natasha Ginzburg, MD, urologist and director of female pelvic medicine and surgery at Upstate. She describes the pelvic floor as a hammock of muscle and tissue that, in women, includes the vagina, rectum and uterus. Problems with urination, defecation and protruding organs in the pelvic floor can be treated successfully through behavioral changes, physical therapy, medicines and biofeedback, with surgery (generally minimally invasive) as a last choice, she said.

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Undescended testicle more common in premature baby boys

Thursday, April 14th, 2016

An undescended testicle occurs in about 3 percent of full-term baby boys but in as many as 45 percent of boys born prematurely, explains Matthew Mason, MD, a pediatric urologist at Upstate. The reasons why one testicle (or occasionally both) does not find its way to the scrotum are unclear, he says, noting that pediatricians check for this problem in well-child visits. Mason also describes aspects of the condition and possible complications, such as reduced fertility and testicular cancer, as well as treatment options.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: April 10, 2016

Wednesday, April 6th, 2016

April 10, 2016

Neurosurgeon Satish Krishnamurthy, MD, discusses hydrocephalus with the parent of a patient. Nurse and certified diabetes educator Kristi Shaver provides tips for living with diabetes. Registered dietitian nutritionist Maureen Franklin shares ideas for maintaining weight loss long term.

 

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What you need to know about kidney cancer

Wednesday, April 6th, 2016

Kidney cancer is often “silent” and discovered when a patient receives an imaging scan for something else, says Oleg Shapiro, MD, vice chair of urology at Upstate. Minimally invasive surgery can usually be done to remove tumors when they are caught early. Shapiro also explains how renal cell carcinoma is the most common type of kidney cancer, how it can be aggressive and what treatments are on the horizon.

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Neurosurgeon, patient’s family seek better solution to hydrocephalus

Wednesday, March 30th, 2016

Hydrocephalus is a fairly common but poorly understood condition with limited remedies, and an Upstate doctor and one of his patients’ families are seeking better treatments. Neurosurgeon Satish Krishnamurthy, MD (at right in photo), explains how the condition creates excess fluid and pressure on the brain, often resolved through surgical insertion of a shunt as a drain. That process can lead to infections and repeated surgeries. Tom Clough, (at left) whose daughter, now 6, has had six shunts inserted, explains how his family started a foundation to advocate and raise money for more research. One grant went to Krishnamurthy, who explains his research for a chemical, rather than a surgical, treatment. 

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Screening, surgery among tools to fight lung cancer

Wednesday, March 30th, 2016

Screening for lung cancer has greatly reduced the chances of dying from that disease among those most at risk, says Upstate thoracic surgeon Jason Wallen, MD, who also describes other advances in treatment. If lung cancer is caught early, surgery is generally the best option, and it can often be done with small incisions, he says, while chemotherapy might be the best choice for cancer that has spread. Wallen also describes the challenges of diagnosing and treating cancer of the esophagus, which is much less common than lung cancer.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: April 3, 2016

Wednesday, March 30th, 2016

April 3, 2016

Director of medical toxicology Ross Sullivan, MD, provides an update on the heroin epidemic. Registered dietitian nutritionist Kristen Davis explains the value of eating organic foods. Thoracic surgeon Jason Wallen, MD, discusses lung and esophageal cancer.

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