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Archive for the ‘ stroke’ Category

HealthLink on Air radio show: November 22, 2015

Friday, November 20th, 2015

November 22, 2015

Gynecologist Renee Mestad, MD, tells about the new medication designed to boost a woman’s libido. Endovascular neurosurgeon Grahame Gould, MD, discusses advances in stroke treatment. Philip Rose, a program coordinator at the Prevention Network of Central New York, provides an update on underage drinking. Orthopedic surgeon William Lavelle, MD, tells how to deal with a muscle pull, or knot, in a shoulder.


New stroke team neurosurgeon offers open as well as minimally invasive surgical options

Thursday, November 5th, 2015

The surgical option for patients suffering from stroke used to be limited to traditional open surgery. Advances in radiology have made it possible for specially trained neurosurgeons, called endovascular neurosurgeons, to make repairs from within blood vessels using catheters and guide wires. “With the advent of interventional radiology techniques, we’re finding more ways to get to places that were hard to get to with surgery, and we can get to them very quickly, which is critical for treating a patient who might be having a stroke,” says Grahame Gould, MD, one of the members of the stroke team at Upstate University Hospital. He goes on to say that he is glad to be able to offer both approaches, since minimally invasive procedures are not necessarily the best option for all patients with neurovascular diseases, including stroke. 


HealthLink on Air radio show: October 18, 2015

Thursday, October 15th, 2015

October 18, 2015:

On this week’s edition of Upstate Medical University’s “HealthLink on Air”: Michael Weiner, MD, explains his research on Alzheimer’s disease and the Brain Health Registry. Neurologist Hesham Masoud, MBBCh, tells about interventional neuroradiology and its role in stroke care. Gail Banach from the Upstate New York Poison Center unveils a new program in Onondaga County for disposing of medical needles and medications.




Today’s stroke care is rapid, precise and minimally invasive

Friday, October 9th, 2015

Some patients who suffer strokes have a clot blocking the blood flow in a vessel in their brains. Quickly getting into the vessel, securing the clot and removing it can be life-saving, says a neurologist at Upstate Medical University. Hesham Masoud, MBBCh, said he has been fortunate to see patients go home from the hospital two days after such clot-retrieving procedures — with no deficits. Masoud is a new member of the team of health professionals at Upstate’s Comprehensive Stroke Center, the first in Central New York.  


Outreach strengthens stroke care throughout region

Thursday, May 28th, 2015

Jennifer Curry, BSN, RN, CCRNThe region’s emergency medical responders are well trained to deal with stroke, partly because of Jennifer Curry, RN. As outreach coordinator for Upstate’s Comprehensive Stroke Program, Curry helps keep EMS teams and outlying hospitals abreast of the latest information on stroke and whether a patient needs to be transferred to Upstate. She also has an easy-to-remember way for the general public to recognize and deal with a possible stroke in a loved one.


Group helps stroke patients avoid social isolation

Thursday, May 28th, 2015

Carrie Garcia, MSA stroke can damage a person’s ability to perform many day-to-day functions, which can lead to social isolation, according to Carrie Garcia, MS, speech language pathologist with the Physical Rehabilitation and Medicine Department at Upstate Medical University. Partnering with a nearby hospital, she helped create a stroke support group that provides patients, loved ones and caregivers with a way to find information and emotional support as well as to socialize and express themselves.


How to recognize a stroke, and why getting to a comprehensive stroke center promptly is crucial

Friday, March 27th, 2015

Carmen M Martinez, MDCatherine Stephens, RNNeurologist Carmen Martinez, MD, and Catherine Stephens, RN, explain why time is critical for someone suffering a stroke. Learn the symptoms, and what happens at Upstate University Hospital even before a stroke patient arrives to the emergency department. They also talk about the value of getting care at a comprehensive stroke center.


Epilepsy in older adults

Thursday, October 9th, 2014

Rebecca O'Dwyer, MDNeurologist Rebecca O’Dwyer, MD, talks about the increase in prevalence of epilepsy among older adults, and how symptoms in the elderly are often not recognized as seizures and thus treated incorrectly. O’Dwyer is a clinical instructor and epilepsy fellow in the Department of Neurology at Upstate Medical University. For more information, call 315 464-4243 and ask for Dr. O’Dwyer.


Biosensors for detecting neural diseases

Wednesday, July 30th, 2014

Sharon A Brangman, MDAlex Travis PhDGeriatrician Sharon Brangman, MD, is joined by researcher Alexander Travis, PhD, to talk about their collaborative work on a new research project that hopes to improve the diagnosis of neural diseases and neurotoxins, including stroke, Alzheimer’s Disease, and traumatic brain injury.  In addition to Upstate, the following campuses are participating in the project: University at Buffalo, College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, Cornell University and SUNY Cortland. Brangman is professor of Medicine and division chief of Geriatrics at Upstate, and director of the Alzheimer’s Disease Assistance Center (ADAC). Travis is associate professor of Reproductive Biology at the Baker Institute for Animal Health at Cornell University. 


What you need to know about atrial fibrillation

Wednesday, June 25th, 2014

Luna Bhatta MD, talks about the causes and treatments of atrial fibrillation, an irregular and often rapid heart rate that commonly causes poor blood flow to the body and can put you at higher risk for a stroke. Symptoms can include heart palpitations, shortness of breath and weakness. Luna is the director of the Heart Rhythm Center and Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology Lab at Upstate. For more information, call 315 464-5973.  Read the “What’s Up at Upstate” blog: Reducing stroke risk in patients with atrial fibrillation


Headaches and vision problems

Wednesday, June 18th, 2014

Melissa W Ko, MDUpstate neuro-ophthalmologist Melissa Ko, MD talks about headaches, and how vision problems that accompany headaches might be brain related. Ko is an associate professor in Neurology and Ophthalmology at Upstate Medical University.


What you need to know about women and stroke

Wednesday, June 11th, 2014

Rochele Clark Rochele (Shelly) Clark, RN, Upstate stroke program coordinator, explains the unique characteristics and risk factors about women and stroke.  The Upstate Stroke Center is the first designated stroke center in Central New York, offering the region’s most comprehensive services and treatments. For more information, call 315 464-8668 or toll free 800 464-8668. Read about the program in “What’s up at Upstate” blog.