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Archive for the ‘ research’ Category

Less-invasive urinary tract surgery; treating rotator cuff, other shoulder injuries; researching diabetes remedies: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, Aug. 21, 2016

Friday, August 19th, 2016

Urologists Dmitriy Nikolavsky, MD, and Jonathan Riddell, MD, talk about surgical innovations to correct problems with the urinary tract in men, women and children. Orthopedic surgeon L. Ryan Smart, MD, discusses common shoulder injuries and their treatment. Ruth Weinstock, MD, PhD, tells about research that is shaping the way diabetes is managed.

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Research offers glimpse into future of diabetes treatments

Friday, August 19th, 2016

Research taking place at Upstate’s Joslin Diabetes Center offers the potential for huge advances in diabetes treatment, says Ruth Weinstock, MD, PhD, Upstate’s chief of endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism. She describes the clinical trials, one of which would create an artificial pancreas by having a blood glucose sensor signal an insulin pump to maintain blood sugar levels automatically. Another looks at whether a gout drug could also protect the kidneys from diabetes damage. People with diabetes or their close relatives who wish to participate in research projects may call 315-464-9007 for more information.

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New, kid-friendly emergency department; preventing elder abuse; PTSD research benefits students, veterans: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, Aug. 14, 2016

Thursday, August 11th, 2016

Medical director Richard Cantor, MD, welcomes patients and families to Upstate’s new pediatric emergency department. Jenny Hicks, project coordinator at the nonprofit social service agency Vera House, discusses elder abuse and its prevention. Upstate neuroscientist Stephen Glatt, PhD, talks about the Research Experiences for Undergraduates program, and its focus on trauma and veterans, with student and project manager Ivan Castro.

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Students, veterans gain research experience as they study PTSD

Thursday, August 11th, 2016

Students and veterans in Central New York benefit from an annual National Science Foundation summer program. Research Experiences for Undergraduates is a program that matches students with mentors from Upstate Medical University, SUNY Oswego or Syracuse University as they research trauma, specifically post-traumatic stress disorder, explains project manager Ivan Castro (at left in photo). Castro, who took part in REU as an undergrad, describes his study of how a positive upbringing relates to resilience in the face of trauma, and he notes that half of the REU students are veterans, who can contribute first-person experience with trauma. Castro’s mentor, Upstate neuroscientist Stephen Glatt, PhD (at right), tells how Castro’s work fits into his own research of how genetics and upbringing influence one’s risk of getting PTSD.

 

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Mild cognitive impairment, Zika virus, pancreas transplant recipients: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for July 17, 2016

Friday, July 15th, 2016

July 17, 2016

Neurologist Amy Sanders, MD, explains mild cognitive impairment. Infectious disease specialist Timothy Endy, MD, tells about the Zika virus. Two pancreas transplant recipients share their experiences with diabetes and kidney disease.

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Pancreas transplants, preventing drowning, breast cancer/prostate cancer link: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for July 10, 2016

Friday, July 8th, 2016

July 10, 2016

Transplant surgeons Rainer Gruessner, MD, and Mark Laftavi, MD, discuss the pancreas transplant program. Pediatrician Robert Newmyer, MD, talks about drowning and water safety. Urologist Srinivas Vourganti, MD, tells how the “breast cancer gene” increases a man’s risk of prostate cancer.

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Inherited gene linked to prostate cancer as well as breast cancer in study

Thursday, June 30th, 2016

A gene mutation linked to breast cancer appears to play a role in some prostate cancer as well, according to a study co-authored by Upstate urologist Srinivas Vourganti, MD. The study looked mostly at the BRCA2 genes, which, when mutated, can lead to breast cancer. When they occur in close relatives, these mutated genes raise the risk of breast cancer for women as well as prostate cancer for men, the study shows, and those prostate cancers tend to be more aggressive. Vourganti explains how a medical student conceived the idea for the study, its implications for African-American men in particular, and how the knowledge might help shape future screenings and treatments.

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Breast-feeding, prostate cancer treatments and historical medical photographs: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for June 26, 2016

Wednesday, June 22nd, 2016

June 26, 2016

Jayne Charlamb, MD, explains why more mothers are breast-feeding their babies. Bernard Poiesz, MD, discusses medications to treat advanced prostate cancer. Upstate graduate Stanley Burns, MD, tells about his historical collection of medical photographs and his work advising TV shows.

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Medical image archive dates from beginning of photography

Thursday, June 16th, 2016

The Burns Archive contains more than a million medically related photos, such as this one of Dr. William L. Rodman’s Surgical Clinic, Philadelphia, March 26, 1902. (PHOTOGRAPH © STANLEY B. BURNS, MD, and THE BURNS ARCHIVE)

Adviser Stanley Burns, MD (left), instructs actor Clive Owen on historical accuracy on the set of the Cinemax series "The Knick," set in a New York City hospital in 1900. (PHOTOGRAPH BY MARY CYBULSKI / CINEMAX)

A passion for detail and for history led Stanley Burns, MD, to amass an unparalleled collection of medical photos dating back to 1839 and to advise for historical accuracy on major TV series, such as the Cinemax’s “The Knick,” set in 1900, and PBS’s “Mercy Street,” set in the Civil War. Burns, a New York City ophthalmologist who graduated from Upstate Medical University in 1964, said the old photos remind him that what the best medical minds are doing today will look just as strange in 50 or 100 years and that we can’t know what details will seem important in the future. He tells how a rented apartment in Syracuse helped inspire his collection, which he has exhibited around the world, and how he went on to write more than 44 books about medical history as well.

 
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Surgery for weight loss; health impact of poverty, violence; caring for those with dementia: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for June 19, 2016

Thursday, June 16th, 2016

June 19, 2016

Surgeon Howard Simon, MD, discusses the connection between weight loss and metabolism, and the effect surgery can have for people with morbid obesity. Researchers Sandra Lane, PhD, and Arnett Haygood-El talk about the impact of poverty and violence on health. Geriatric resource nurses Kaylin Brainerd and Linh Nguyen provide guidance to caregivers of people with dementia.

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Researchers seek answers to how poverty, violence affect health

Friday, June 3rd, 2016

Is street violence an addictive behavior? How does a violence or poverty affect how a child learns, how police deal with crime and how landlords treat tenants? These and other social determinants of health are being studied by Sandra Lane, PhD (at left), a professor of public health at Syracuse University, and Arnett Haygood-El (at right), associate director of the Street Addiction institute Inc. in Syracuse. Health does not exist in a vacuum but as part of a person’s environment, they explain, and they are seeking solutions to the trauma inflicted by violence and poverty. 

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HealthLink on Air radio show/podcast: May 29, 2016

Wednesday, May 25th, 2016

May 29, 2016

Vascular surgeon Michael Costanza, MD, goes over the importance of screening for vascular diseases. Research scientist Stephen Glatt, PhD, discusses the genetic epidemiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. Meaghan Greeley and Tiffany Brec from Vera House talk about strategies for stopping sexual violence.

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