Archive Posts

Archive for the ‘ public health’ Category

HealthLink on Air radio show: December 20, 2015

Friday, December 18th, 2015

December 20, 2015

Gynecologist Renee Mestad, MD, goes over the current contraceptive options. Psychologist Rich O’Neill, PhD, talks about how to survive holiday stress. Elizabeth Sapio from the  Safe Kids Upstate NY Coalition gives tips on keeping kids safe from accidents at this time of year.

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Check Up From the Neck Up: Encouraging loved ones to quit smoking

Thursday, December 17th, 2015

Upstate psychologist Rich O’Neill, PhD, tells about research showing that what doctors say or don’t say has a big impact on whether someone stops smoking. He says the single best thing you can do for your health is to stop smoking, which likely will add six or seven years to your life. Upstate offers free smoking cessation classes.

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Preventing accidental harm to kids a challenge during holidays

Thursday, December 17th, 2015

Securing a baby in a car seat or preventing a toddler from choking require added vigilance during the holiday season, as new foods, toys and brightly colored objects appear and the weather turns cold, says Elizabeth Sapio, coordinator of the Safe Kids Upstate NY Coalition at the Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital. The program’s website provides information on many ways to keep children safe from accidental injuries and offers links to further resources, says Sapio, who is also the pediatric injury prevention coordinator at Golisano.

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Holiday eating tips include thinking first, choosing well

Monday, December 14th, 2015

Take a moment to think before overeating during the December holiday season and remember you can make healthy choices. That’s the advice of Maureen Franklin, a registered dietitian nutritionist at Upstate, who offers practical tips on how to avoid mindless eating and weight gain while still enjoying yourself.

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A look at how big institutions are going green

Thursday, December 10th, 2015

Thomas Pelis

Environmental concerns are now built into the way many big institutions work, and the results can also save money. Thomas Pelis, assistant vice president for facilities and planning sustainability at Upstate, decribes the medical university’s “holistic” process of constructing buildings to conserve water, recycling medical instruments to save money or food waste to cut trash disposal costs and looks at where this might lead in the future.

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New screenings for kids include cholesterol, depression, HIV

Thursday, December 10th, 2015

 

Beth Nelsen, MD

New guidelines suggesting that all children be screened for high cholesterol, depression and HIV are based on research showing rising numbers of kids with those problems, explains Upstate pediatrician Beth Nelsen, MD. Ages vary for the screenings — from 9 to 11 for cholesterol, and from 16 to 19 for HIV – which are updated  annually by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Many tests, including for anemia and heart failure, have already been added by pediatricians during checkups, Nelsen said.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: December 13, 2015

Thursday, December 10th, 2015

December 13, 2015

Upstate pediatrician Beth Nelsen, MD, discusses the new screening guidelines for children and adolescents. Health sciences librarian Cristina Pope tells about the Healthy Pets Project. Registered dietitian nutritionist Maureen Franklin gives advice on holiday eating.

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Urban gardening yields multifaceted harvest

Friday, December 4th, 2015

Urban gardening programs can yield more than just fresh produce — they can unite neighborhoods, teach life skills and promote healthy eating and social justice. Several organizations in Syracuse sponsor gardening projects and also work together to promote the idea. Upstate pediatricians Travis Hobart, MD (left), and Joseph Nimeh, MD, describe how their interests in gardening and promoting health led them to join the process.

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Pets offer a way to learn about healthy living

Friday, December 4th, 2015

Cristina PopePeople can feel so bombarded with messages about their health that they stop listening. But they might listen to a message about their pet’s health. That’s the “back door” to teaching people about their own health, says the director of Upstate’s Health Sciences Library, Cristina Pope, who has started The Healthy Pet Project with funding from the National Institutes of Health. Through seminars at local libraries, people learn how to care for their cats and dogs, but also how closely their pets’ needs and diseases parallel their own.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: December 6, 2015

Friday, December 4th, 2015

December 6, 2015

radio showPhysical therapist Patrick VanBeveren talks about lifelong brain health. Transplant surgeon Rainer Gruessner, MD, discusses kidney and pancreas transplant options. Pediatricians Travis Hobart, MD, and Joseph Nimeh, MD, explain how food relates to social justice and nutrition.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: November 22, 2015

Friday, November 20th, 2015

November 22, 2015

Gynecologist Renee Mestad, MD, tells about the new medication designed to boost a woman’s libido. Endovascular neurosurgeon Grahame Gould, MD, discusses advances in stroke treatment. Philip Rose, a program coordinator at the Prevention Network of Central New York, provides an update on underage drinking. Orthopedic surgeon William Lavelle, MD, tells how to deal with a muscle pull, or knot, in a shoulder.

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Best flu season advice: Get your flu shot

Monday, November 16th, 2015

The average person’s best protection against the flu is an annual shot, and everyone over the age of six months should get vaccinated, with few exceptions, says Bruce Simmons, MD, director of employee/student health at Upstate Medical University in Syracuse.

Except for people with bad reactions or egg allergies, a shot is the best prevention against this highly contagious influenza virus, which is spread by droplets from infected people and can cause severe fatigue and fever as well as complicate chronic illnesses, Simmons notes. He also advises washing one’s hands and avoiding contact with flu sufferers as addition preventive measures in the October-to-May flu season.

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