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Archive for the ‘ public health’ Category

Upstate researcher explains efforts to control mosquito-borne dengue fever

Thursday, October 22nd, 2015

Dengue fever, a tropical disease present in subtropical areas of the United States, must be fought on several fronts, such as research, public education and government policy, says Upstate researcher Anna Stewart-Ibarra, PhD, MPA. She is working to find the solution to this mosquito-borne virus through research both in Syracuse and in Ecuador and outlines the effect of climate change and El Niño as well as attempts to control mosquitoes and find a vaccine for this incurable disease.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: October 18, 2015

Thursday, October 15th, 2015

October 18, 2015:

On this week’s edition of Upstate Medical University’s “HealthLink on Air”: Michael Weiner, MD, explains his research on Alzheimer’s disease and the Brain Health Registry. Neurologist Hesham Masoud, MBBCh, tells about interventional neuroradiology and its role in stroke care. Gail Banach from the Upstate New York Poison Center unveils a new program in Onondaga County for disposing of medical needles and medications.

 

 

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How to safely dispose of needles, other sharp medical devices and expired or unused medications

Friday, October 9th, 2015

Nine law-enforcement offices throughout Onondaga County are now collection sites for needles, other sharp medical devices and expired or unused medications, thanks to a new effort to reduce availability and accessibility of drugs. Gail Banach, the director of public education and communication for the Upstate New York Poison Center, explains how the program works and points to guidelines from the Food and Drug Administration for the safe disposal of medications. 

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Most teens avoid alcohol, but a quarter of underage youth still drink, sometimes bingeing

Friday, October 9th, 2015

Host Linda Cohen with Philip Rose

Even though the message that alcohol can harm young people is getting through, a quarter of those under the legal age still drink alcohol. Among them, binge drinking and a rise in female drinking have been noted, according to Philip Rose, program coordinator for underage drinking for the Prevention Network of Central New York. Bad decisions, risky behaviors and harm to the still-developing adolescent brain are all consequences of alcohol use, and peer and other pressures glamorize alcohol, Rose says. Still, he says, parents, teachers and other adults can wield influence by modeling good behavior, developing a trusting relationship with their children and talking frankly about alcohol.

 

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HealthLink on Air radio show: October 11, 2015

Friday, October 9th, 2015

October 11, 2015:

On this week’s edition of Upstate Medical University’s “HealthLink on Air”: Pediatric rheumatologist Caitlin Sgarlat Deluca, DO, tells of adding integrative medicine to rheumatology. Pediatric infectious disease expert Jana Shaw, MD, provides an update on vaccinations. Psychologist Kevin Antshel, PhD, explains the psychopathology of autism.

 
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HealthLink On Air radio show: October 4, 2015

Thursday, October 1st, 2015

October 4, 2015:

On this week’s edition of Upstate Medical University’s “HealthLink on Air”: Ramsay Farah, MD, discusses melanoma, the diagnosis former President Jimmy Carter recently disclosed. David Keith, MD, goes over theories of family therapy. Meghan Jacobs, MD, discusses the effects of corporal punishment.

 

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Pediatrician warns of dangers of not vaccinating children

Thursday, October 1st, 2015

Illness and even death can result when children go unvaccinated, says Jana Shaw, MD, MPH, an associate professor of pediatrics and an infectious disease specialist at Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital. Modern vaccines are extremely safe – they do not cause autism — and are designed to be given on a certain schedule, she says, explaining how unvaccinated children contributed to a measles outbreak in California. Shaw advises parents to follow reliable medical advice and to check with their doctor or school about children’s required vaccines.

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Upstate at Home program offers urgent care house calls

Tuesday, September 22nd, 2015

Christian Knutsen, MDAn old medical custom — the house call — is being revived. Upstate at Home will send a doctor to homes in Syracuse’s eastern suburbs from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. daily to deal with minor maladies, such as sore throats or ear infections, thus avoiding a difficult trip to a hospital or a long wait at a doctor’s office, explained Christian Knutsen, MD, the Upstate emergency medicine physician who created the program. Patients call 315-464-4646 to speak to a nurse, who sends a doctor if the case is appropriate. The visit requires a co-payment, and many insurance companies will cover the visit. Learn more at http://www.upstate.edu/emergency/healthcare/upstateathome/index.php

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Outreach strengthens stroke care throughout region

Thursday, May 28th, 2015

Jennifer Curry, BSN, RN, CCRNThe region’s emergency medical responders are well trained to deal with stroke, partly because of Jennifer Curry, RN. As outreach coordinator for Upstate’s Comprehensive Stroke Program, Curry helps keep EMS teams and outlying hospitals abreast of the latest information on stroke and whether a patient needs to be transferred to Upstate. She also has an easy-to-remember way for the general public to recognize and deal with a possible stroke in a loved one.

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A student committed to public health and adolescent medicine

Friday, May 22nd, 2015

Nicole CifraAdolescents can fall into a medical “no man’s land” between pediatrics and adult medicine, said Upstate student Nicole Cifra, whose interest and work in the treatment of teens helped win her a U.S. Public Health Service Excellence in Public Health Award. Cifra, who will receive an MD/MPH degree in 2016, talks about the public health aspects of adolescence, especially eating disorders, and sees hope for the future.

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“She Matters” breast education program

Friday, January 16th, 2015

Maxine Thompson & Linda VeitThe death rate from breast cancer is 41 percent higher for black women compared to white women. To help improve that rate, Upstate sponsors a breast education program called She Matters. The goal is to get more women in for mammography screening, to find and treat any breast cancers early. She Matters is made possible through a grant from the Susan G. Komen Central New York Affiliate. For information on obtaining a mammogram, call: 315-217-5825. Hear about the program in this segment from organizers Linda Veit, a special projects manager in the Upstate Cancer Center, and Maxine Thompson, assistant vice president in the Office of Diversity and Inclusion.

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New Emergency Department director talks about what lies ahead

Thursday, October 9th, 2014

Jeremy D Joslin, MD Jeremy Joslin, MD, new medical director of the emergency department at Upstate Medical University, tells what to expect when you visit a level 1 trauma center, the specialty services available, and his vision and goals for emergency medicine at Upstate. Joslin is assistant professor and fellowship program director of Emergency Medicine at Upstate. 

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