Archive Posts

Archive for the ‘ public health’ Category

Dangerous highs: Teens are abusing sprays, cold remedies, antidiarrheals

Thursday, May 12th, 2016

Teenagers looking to get high are abusing easily available household products, says Upstate toxicologist William Eggleston. Hydrocarbons, found in aerosol sprays, are being inhaled and can lead to irregular heart rhythms and “sudden sniffing death syndrome.” Loperamide (brand name: Imodium), an over-the-counter anti-diarrhea drug, is being taken in megadoses for a heroinlike effect. Dextromethorphan, found in cough and cold remedies, acts like the drug PCP in high doses and causes agitation and combativeness. Eggleston, who sees drug overdose cases through the Upstate New York Poison Center, recommends keeping track of drugs around the house and disposing of old ones to help limit access and prevent abuse.

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Awareness, courage recommended to overcome sexual violence

Thursday, May 12th, 2016

Countering sexual violence can start with a conversation to raise awareness and encourage people to speak out and intervene If necessary. This applies to college campuses as well as the larger society, say Meaghan Greeley (at left in photo)  and Tiffany Brec (at right in photo) of Vera House, a Central New York agency that deals with domestic and sexual violence. In community sessions about sexual violence, Brec and Greeley encourage people to think about the culture’s and their own attitudes, the role of bystanders and how violent acts eventually affect society as a whole.

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How vascular disease can lead to muscle problems, heart attacks, strokes

Thursday, May 12th, 2016

Vascular disease, or diseases of the blood vessels, can lead to difficulty walking, heart attacks, strokes and gangrene, explains Upstate vascular surgeon Michael Costanza, MD. Changes in lifestyle habits often help: Don’t smoke, get reasonable exercise, follow a healthy diet, and control any problems with diabetes, cholesterol or blood pressure. Costanza also addressed how vascular disease is diagnosed, who is likely to get it and the importance of screening.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: May 15, 2016

Thursday, May 12th, 2016

May 15, 2016

Upstate surgeon Scott Albert, MD, explains the new way of thinking about thyroid cancer. Upstate toxicologist William Eggleston tells of the dangers of hydrocarbons and commonly abused medications. Support group facilitator Christine Kowaleski discusses postpartum depression and psychosis with Central New York mother Heather Sherman.

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Help is available for new or expectant mothers with depression, anxiety

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

Postpartum depression and anxiety are fairly common, says Christine Kowaleski (at right in photo), a nurse practitioner who facilitates a support group for new mothers and expectant mothers. Taking part in that group is Heather Sherman (at left in photo) of Baldwinsville, who shares her personal postpartum story of suicidal thoughts and her struggles to find treatment and help others with similar problems. Kowaleski, an associate professor at Crouse Hospital’s Pomeroy College of Nursing, also explains the differences between “baby blues” and postpartum depression and tells how to get help (call 315-470-7940 to register for the free, weekly support group).

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HealthLink on Air radio show: May 8, 2016

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

May 8, 2016

Paramedic Todd Curtis and emergency physician Jeremy Joslin, MD, tell how they provide medical safety oversight for TV wilderness adventure programs. Cardiologist Harold Smulyan, MD, discusses screening of and treatments for high blood pressure. Pediatric cancer researcher William Kerr, PhD, explains his immunotherapy research.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: May 1, 2016

Friday, April 29th, 2016

May 1, 2016

Jack Wohlers, PhD, of Centre Syracuse tells about detection and treatment of eating disorders. Rich O’Neill, PhD, talks about how to help a loved one struggling with addiction. Upstate graduate Michael Weiner, MD, discusses an Alzheimer’s disease research project that seeks participants.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: April 17, 2016

Thursday, April 14th, 2016

April 17, 2016

Urologist Oleg Shapiro, MD, discusses kidney cancer. Nurses Lorrie Langdon and Michelle Vallelunga tell about atrial fibrillation and its connection to stroke. Wikipedian Lane Rasberry talks about the medical information available at the online encyclopedia.

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Wikipedian offer insights into online medical information

Thursday, April 7th, 2016

Lane Rasberry is confident that Wikipedia, the most consulted source of medical information, is of comparable value to online medical sources such as WebMD and the Mayo Clinic. As the Wikipedian in residence at Consumer Reports, specializing in health information, he visited Upstate to explain the free online encyclopedia and show how people can become involved. Rasberry notes his history with Wikipedia, how its medical and other information is edited and the importance of citing reliable sources.

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Atrial fibrillation: A heart problem that can lead to stroke

Wednesday, April 6th, 2016

Atrial fibrillation, or “a-fib,” is a common heart problem that can greatly increase the risk of stroke, as two Upstate nurses explain. A heart that is in atrial fibrillation is beating too fast, too slow or irregularly, which might allow blood to pool and clot instead of being pumped normally, say Lorraine “Lorrie” Langdon (at right), coordinator of the Heart Failure Program, and Michelle Vallelunga (at left), data coordinator of the Comprehensive Stroke Center at Upstate. Those clots can travel to the brain and cause a stroke. The nurses go over risk factors and how atrial fibrillation is diagnosed and treated, plus what to do if you think someone is experiencing atrial fibrillation or a stroke.

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Heroin epidemic: tangled roots, many challenges

Wednesday, March 30th, 2016

Finding a treatment program and overcoming an addition to heroin or another opioid is difficult but not impossible, says Ross Sullivan, MD, director of medical toxicology at Upstate Medical University.  Sullivan tells how the effort to control pain medically helped create the current addiction crisis in opioids — drugs derived from the opium poppy (heroin, morphine) or that mimic them synthetically (fentanyl, oxycodone). Recent restrictions on prescription drugs have led to a flood of cheap heroin to fill the gap, he says, and current treatment options are inadequate to fight the high addiction rates. He outlines how the Upstate New York Poison Center (hotline: 800-222-1222) is offering information and help to schools and the general public.

 

 

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Screening, surgery among tools to fight lung cancer

Wednesday, March 30th, 2016

Screening for lung cancer has greatly reduced the chances of dying from that disease among those most at risk, says Upstate thoracic surgeon Jason Wallen, MD, who also describes other advances in treatment. If lung cancer is caught early, surgery is generally the best option, and it can often be done with small incisions, he says, while chemotherapy might be the best choice for cancer that has spread. Wallen also describes the challenges of diagnosing and treating cancer of the esophagus, which is much less common than lung cancer.

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