Archive Posts

Archive for the ‘ public health’ Category

Evaluating the promise of organic foods

Friday, March 18th, 2016

Foods labeled “organic” carry an aura of better nutrition, but at a higher price. While there is no definitive answer yet, some evidence suggests higher levels of some nutrients in organically raised produce, meats, dairy products and eggs, as well as the decreased exposure to pesticides and antibiotics, says Kristen Davis, a registered dietitian nutritionist at Upstate. Bacteria levels in organic meats might also be high, requiring careful cooking. Davis also discusses the so-called “dirty dozen” and “clean 15″ fruits and vegetables and which produce is most important to purchase as organic, and she stresses the value of eating a variety of fruits and vegetables, preferably fresh, in a balanced diet.

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Getting to know Upstate’s new president

Thursday, March 3rd, 2016

Being born in a poor country, training as a pediatrician, teaching medical students and working in impoverished areas have all contributed to the background of Upstate Medical University’s new president. Danielle Laraque-Arena, MD, tells of her birth in Haiti, her upbringing from age 7 in New York City and her passion for the rigors of medical research as well as the need for doctors to get real-life experience and for medical care to reach the underprivileged. She also takes a look at the future of medical education and health care.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: March 6, 2016

Thursday, March 3rd, 2016

March 6, 2016

Infectious disease expert Timothy Endy, MD, discusses the Zika virus. Upstate Medical University’s new president, Danielle Laraque-Arena, MD, introduces herself to the community. Colorectal surgeon David Halleran, MD, tells about colorectal cancer prevention. Leslie Kohman, MD, explains a program that offers free kits to test for colorectal cancer.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: February 14, 2016

Thursday, February 11th, 2016

February 14, 2016

Upstate radiologist Santiago Miro, MD, tells what’s new in lung cancer screening on this week’s show. Then, Connie Gregory and Aldrine Ashong-Katai tell about a partnership that aims to improve health disparities in public housing neighborhoods, and Upstate pediatric anesthesiologist Joseph Resti, MD, goes over what to expect when a baby or older child faces surgery.

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Upstate trains advocates to spread healthy messages through neighborhoods

Thursday, February 4th, 2016

Through a partnership with the Syracuse Housing Authority, Upstate is helping to reduce health disparities in public housing neighborhoods. Connie Gregory (at right) and Aldrine Ashong-Katai explain how resident health advocates are trained in important chronic health and social conditions and asked to share the information with their neighbors. “People are more apt to listen to people they can relate to,” explains Ashong-Katai. He and Gregory work in Upstate’s office of diversity and inclusion.

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New guidelines say children should be screened for high cholesterol

Thursday, February 4th, 2016

Children between age 9 and 11, and again between 18 and 21, should have their cholesterol checked through a blood test, according to new guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics. Testing previously was reserved for children whose families included a history of high cholesterol, explains Upstate pediatrician Travis Hobart, MD. Now the strategy is to identify cholesterol problems early to allow time to intervene. “Children with high cholesterol are much more likely to become adults with a bad cholesterol profile,” he says.

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Health insurers now pay for lung cancer screening for smokers, former smokers

Thursday, February 4th, 2016

Low-dose computerized tomography scans can help locate lung cancers at the earliest, most treatable stages, says Upstate radiologist Santiago Miro, MD. He tells about the lung cancer screening program at Upstate (call 1-800-464-8668 for an appointment) which is now covered by most health insurance plans. It’s designed for people between the ages of 55 and 77 who have smoked what is known as “30 pack years.” That’s a pack a day for 30 years, or two packs a day for 15 years, or other variations. The testing is also for people who quit smoking within the last 15 years. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States.

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Factors that contribute to the childhood obesity epidemic

Thursday, February 4th, 2016

Syracuse University professor Amy Ellen Schwartz, PhD, examines factors that may influence America’s obesity epidemic in schoolchildren. She has looked at physical education, school lunches and the barriers to walking to school. More recently she studied the obesity rates in New York City schools that installed water jets in school cafeterias, which allow kids to quickly fill cups or bottles with cold water. “After the installation of the water jets, obesity rates go down, and weight goes down,” she says. “And we’re convinced it’s a causal relationship because we can compare it with schools that did not get the water jets.” Schwartz specializes in economics in SU’s Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs.

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Here’s how Lyme disease is diagnosed and treated

Wednesday, January 20th, 2016

Lyme disease is treated successfully with a short course of antibiotics in most cases, but prevention is the key to controlling the disease, say two experts from Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital. Since the bacterial infection is transmitted to humans by deer ticks, people should wear long sleeves and pants when outdoors even in warm weather, as well as check their skin afterward, say Caitlin Sgarlat, DO (at left in photo, with program host Linda Cohen at center, and Jana Shaw, MD), who specializes in rheumatology and integrative medicine, and Jana Shaw, MD, who specializes in infectious diseases. They explain how quick and careful removal of ticks prevents transmission of the disease and why they advise against the long-term use of antibiotics for Lyme disease patients with lingering problems after treatment. They also explain how the disease is diagnosed and its typical symptoms.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: Jan. 10, 2016

Thursday, January 7th, 2016

January 10, 2016

Upstate urologist Rakesh Khanna, MD, addresses prostate cancer. Upstate physical medicine and rehabilitation specialists Margaret Turk, MD, and Robert Weber, MD, tell what patients can expect from a rehabilitation team. Syracuse University earth sciences professor Donald Siegel, PhD, explores the scientific evidence on hydraulic fracturing.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: Jan. 3, 2016

Saturday, January 2nd, 2016

January 3, 2016

Upstate cardiologist Harold Smulyan, MD, and infectious disease expert Donald Blair, MD, take a historical look at a deadly heart infection. Upstate assistant vice president Thomas Pelis shares how big institutions, such as Upstate Medical University, are going green. Bioethics and humanities assistant professor Thomas Curran, MD, and associate professor Robert Olick, JD, PhD, discuss the importance of the health care proxy.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: December 27, 2015

Saturday, December 26th, 2015

Professor of psychiatry Stephen Faraone, PhD, provides an update on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Concussion expert Brian Rieger, PhD, tells about winter head injuries. Pulmonologist Lawrence Kurlandsky, MD (retired), explains his research into Christmas tree syndrome. And pediatrician Steven Blatt, MD, discusses what to do about dry skin.

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