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Archive for the ‘ public health’ Category

Zika virus update; integrative treatment for diabetes; ear infections explained: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, Aug. 28, 2016

Thursday, August 25th, 2016

Aug. 28, 2016

Infectious disease expert Mark Polhemus, MD, provides an update on the Zika virus threat. Haidy Marzouk, MD, goes over pediatric ear infections. Barbara Feuerstein, MD, talks about an integrative approach to diabetes and wellness.

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What women of childbearing age and men need to know about Zika virus

Thursday, August 25th, 2016

Most people who become infected with the Zika virus have such mild symptoms, if any, that they aren’t aware of the infection. The human body is able to get rid of the virus within a few months, says Mark Polhemus, MD, an infectious disease expert at Upstate Medical University who directs the Center for Global Health and Translational Science. Because the virus is linked to severe birth defects, women who are exposed to Zika are advised to wait at least eight weeks before becoming pregnant, so the virus is out of their bodies. Because the virus lives longer in semen, men are told to protect sexual partners from pregnancy for at least six months. Polhemus explains that Zika is transmitted through the bite of an infected mosquito but also has the ability to spread through sexual contact and from mother to unborn baby. He also notes that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s map includes Central New York among areas at risk for spread of the disease.

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Trauma unit’s specialists ready to treat youngest patients

Thursday, August 25th, 2016

A team of pediatric specialists treats the wide range of trauma that children encounter, says Kim Wallenstein, MD, the new medical director of Upstate’s pediatric trauma unit. Wallenstein, a pediatric surgeon, explains how children who have been injured by anything from bicycle accidents to gunshot wounds are brought in and treated at the only level-one pediatric trauma center in Upstate New York.

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Cancer Moonshot a wide-reaching effort to fight the disease

Thursday, August 25th, 2016

The Cancer Moonshot initiative aims to accelerate, coordinate and improve the understanding, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer. It would involve patients, doctors, drug companies and almost anyone involved with cancer, explains Upstate urologist and cancer researcher Leszek Kotula, MD, PhD. Among its goals are improving the sharing of information, speeding up the approval of new drugs, funding more research and improving access to care for underserved groups, he says.

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Missionary nursing teaches lessons in life, work

Friday, August 19th, 2016

A willingness to live in harsh or unpredictable conditions and to overcome obstacles is a necessity for a missionary nurse. Victoria Okhman, a nurse at the Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital, tells of her experiences in Russia, dealing mostly with orphan children, where she learned to appreciate the job’s potential and accept its limitations. Okhman also tells how she applies the experience to her work at Upstate.

 

 

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New, kid-friendly emergency department; preventing elder abuse; PTSD research benefits students, veterans: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, Aug. 14, 2016

Thursday, August 11th, 2016

Medical director Richard Cantor, MD, welcomes patients and families to Upstate’s new pediatric emergency department. Jenny Hicks, project coordinator at the nonprofit social service agency Vera House, discusses elder abuse and its prevention. Upstate neuroscientist Stephen Glatt, PhD, talks about the Research Experiences for Undergraduates program, and its focus on trauma and veterans, with student and project manager Ivan Castro.

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Kids now have their own emergency department at Upstate University Hospital

Tuesday, August 9th, 2016
 

(PHOTO BY ABIGAIL MILLER)

Upstate University Hospital has the only emergency department specializing in pediatrics in Central New York. Now, those pediatric emergency specialists provide medical care in a space customized for kids from birth to age 19. The pediatric emergency department is separate from the main emergency department, relocated within the hospital to a unit with 20 patient examination rooms. Each of those rooms has a window and private bathroom. Medical Director Richard Cantor, MD, explains how the new space was designed to provide a comfort zone for patients, their parents and siblings during what can be a time of great stress.
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Awareness helps stop often-unreported scourge of elder abuse

Thursday, August 4th, 2016

(PHOTO BY ABIGAIL MILLER)

Elder abuse usually occurs at home at the hands of family members and might be physical, emotional, sexual or financial. It often goes unreported because the victim feels isolated, afraid and ashamed. One way to fight elder abuse is to be aware of its warning signs, explains Jenny Hicks, project coordinator for the Abuse in Later Life program at Vera House, a local domestic and social service agency. Suspected elder abuse can be reported (confidentially, if needed) to the local Adult Protective Services (315-435-2815); Vera House provides services for older adults including a 24-hour crisis and support line: 315-468-3260; and the local Office for the Aging (315-435-2362) also can serve as a resource.

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Donating one of her kidneys to a stranger; how living donors save lives; a whole-person approach to kicking opioid addiction: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, Aug. 7, 2016

Thursday, August 4th, 2016

Upstate University Hospital nurse Jody Adams tells why she donated one of her kidneys to a woman she had never met. Upstate transplant surgeon Vaughn Whittaker, MD, explains how such kidney donations are saving and improving lives. Upstate psychiatrist Brian Johnson, MD, discusses a holistic treatment for opioid addiction.

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Unique approach to opioid addiction treats the whole person

Wednesday, July 27th, 2016

Opioid addiction presents many challenges for the medical world, including how to get people off the drug successfully. Habitual use of these painkilling drugs can make people more sensitive to pain, notes Brian Johnson, MD, director of pain medicine and addiction medicine at Upstate. Johnson, who is also a professor of psychiatry and anesthesiology, explains how opioid use got out of control and how Upstate uses a unique, holistic system to detoxify addicts while dealing with their other medical and psychiatric problems as well.

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Polio survivor’s tale of terror, hope; post-polio syndrome and its treatments; how ethics consultants help hospital patients: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, July 31, 2016

Wednesday, July 27th, 2016

July 31, 2016

Neurologist Burk Jubelt, MD, explains polio and post-polio syndrome, and a survivor from a 1950s epidemic shares her story. Bioethicists Robert Olick, JD, PhD, and Thomas Curran, MD, discuss a real-life case involving medical ethics.

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E-cigarette dangers; how mother’s opiate use affects her baby; doctor, patient views on digestive disorder: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, July 24, 2016

Friday, July 22nd, 2016

July 24, 2016

Respiratory therapist Theresa Hankin goes over the dangers and new regulations of e-cigarettes. Neonatologist Michelle Bode, MD, explains the effect of a mother’s opiate use on her baby. Gastroenterologist Divey Manocha, MD, talks about digestive diseases with one of his patients.

 

 

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