Archive Posts

Archive for the ‘ public health’ Category

HealthLink on Air radio show: May 1, 2016

Friday, April 29th, 2016

May 1, 2016

Jack Wohlers, PhD, of Centre Syracuse tells about detection and treatment of eating disorders. Rich O’Neill, PhD, talks about how to help a loved one struggling with addiction. Upstate graduate Michael Weiner, MD, discusses an Alzheimer’s disease research project that seeks participants.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: April 17, 2016

Thursday, April 14th, 2016

April 17, 2016

Urologist Oleg Shapiro, MD, discusses kidney cancer. Nurses Lorrie Langdon and Michelle Vallelunga tell about atrial fibrillation and its connection to stroke. Wikipedian Lane Rasberry talks about the medical information available at the online encyclopedia.

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Wikipedian offer insights into online medical information

Thursday, April 7th, 2016

Lane Rasberry is confident that Wikipedia, the most consulted source of medical information, is of comparable value to online medical sources such as WebMD and the Mayo Clinic. As the Wikipedian in residence at Consumer Reports, specializing in health information, he visited Upstate to explain the free online encyclopedia and show how people can become involved. Rasberry notes his history with Wikipedia, how its medical and other information is edited and the importance of citing reliable sources.

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Atrial fibrillation: A heart problem that can lead to stroke

Wednesday, April 6th, 2016

Atrial fibrillation, or “a-fib,” is a common heart problem that can greatly increase the risk of stroke, as two Upstate nurses explain. A heart that is in atrial fibrillation is beating too fast, too slow or irregularly, which might allow blood to pool and clot instead of being pumped normally, say Lorraine “Lorrie” Langdon (at right), coordinator of the Heart Failure Program, and Michelle Vallelunga (at left), data coordinator of the Comprehensive Stroke Center at Upstate. Those clots can travel to the brain and cause a stroke. The nurses go over risk factors and how atrial fibrillation is diagnosed and treated, plus what to do if you think someone is experiencing atrial fibrillation or a stroke.

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Heroin epidemic: tangled roots, many challenges

Wednesday, March 30th, 2016

Finding a treatment program and overcoming an addition to heroin or another opioid is difficult but not impossible, says Ross Sullivan, MD, director of medical toxicology at Upstate Medical University.  Sullivan tells how the effort to control pain medically helped create the current addiction crisis in opioids — drugs derived from the opium poppy (heroin, morphine) or that mimic them synthetically (fentanyl, oxycodone). Recent restrictions on prescription drugs have led to a flood of cheap heroin to fill the gap, he says, and current treatment options are inadequate to fight the high addiction rates. He outlines how the Upstate New York Poison Center (hotline: 800-222-1222) is offering information and help to schools and the general public.

 

 

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Screening, surgery among tools to fight lung cancer

Wednesday, March 30th, 2016

Screening for lung cancer has greatly reduced the chances of dying from that disease among those most at risk, says Upstate thoracic surgeon Jason Wallen, MD, who also describes other advances in treatment. If lung cancer is caught early, surgery is generally the best option, and it can often be done with small incisions, he says, while chemotherapy might be the best choice for cancer that has spread. Wallen also describes the challenges of diagnosing and treating cancer of the esophagus, which is much less common than lung cancer.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: April 3, 2016

Wednesday, March 30th, 2016

April 3, 2016

Director of medical toxicology Ross Sullivan, MD, provides an update on the heroin epidemic. Registered dietitian nutritionist Kristen Davis explains the value of eating organic foods. Thoracic surgeon Jason Wallen, MD, discusses lung and esophageal cancer.

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Tips for managing diabetes

Thursday, March 24th, 2016

Diabetes requires knowledge and discipline to manage, as well as emotional support from friends and relatives, says nurse Kristi Shaver, a certified diabetes educator and the education team leader at Upstate’s Joslin Diabetes Center. Shaver outlines the differences between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes and discusses how they relate to alcohol, stress, obesity and other illnesses. She also outlines resources for those who wish to learn more about managing diabetes.

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Why immunizations are important for adults, too

Thursday, March 24th, 2016

Do most adults know they need a tetanus booster shot every 10 years? Immunization recommendations can vary according to age, disease and other factors and should be discussed with one’s primary care provider, says Upstate’s family medicine department chair, John Epling, MD, who is among the experts helping to shape those recommendations at the national level. Epling explains changes in this year’s schedule for adults and also the process of reviewing and updating that schedule.

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Ideas for maintaining weight loss long term

Thursday, March 24th, 2016

How do you control your weight over the long term? Suggestions from real-life success stories include eating breakfast regularly and watching less TV, according to Maureen Franklin, a registered dietitian nutritionist at Upstate. She reviews these and other tips from her professional experience and from the National Weight Control Registry, which surveys people about their weight and habits. Franklin also touches on goal setting, grocery shopping and attitudes toward dieting. 

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HealthLink on Air radio show: March 27, 2016

Wednesday, March 23rd, 2016

March 27, 2016

Joan Pellegrino, MD, discusses the role of genetics in rare diseases. Registered dietitian nutritionist Maria Erdman goes over the new food guidelines. John Epling, MD, explains who needs adult immunizations.

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New food guidelines include coffee

Friday, March 18th, 2016

A healthy eating pattern includes fruits, vegetables, dairy, whole grains, protein and oils and limits intake of saturated fats and sodium. There’s also room for coffee, says Upstate registered dietitian nutritionist Maria Erdman. New food guidelines from the U.S. departments of Agriculture and of Health and Human Services for the first time include coffee, she says, because research shows it may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, dementia and some cancers. Nutritional recommendations designed to improve the health of Americans through diet are issued every five years. 

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