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Archive for the ‘ public health’ Category

Transitional care, suicide prevention, lupus overview: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for July 3, 2016

Thursday, June 30th, 2016

July 3, 2016

Geriatrician Sharon Brangman, MD, and nurse Amy Rottger explain the role of transitional care. Representatives from Contact Community Services Crisis Intervention Services discuss suicide prevention. Rheumatologist Hiroshi Kato, MD, provides an overview of lupus. Also, a Check Up From the Neck Up and a selection from The Healing Muse.

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Mothers’ opioid use can lead to withdrawal, neonatal abstinence syndrome in newborns

Thursday, June 30th, 2016

A growing number of babies are born to mothers who took a narcotic of some kind during pregnancy, and that puts the babies at risk for developing neonatal abstinence syndrome, says Michelle Bode, MD, an Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital assistant professor and Crouse Hospital neonatologist. Within the first week of life, a baby who was exposed to prescription or nonprescription opioids in the womb may become irritable, have trouble feeding and develop a shrill cry, she says. The baby is likely to have a longer-than-normal hospital stay, which impacts on bonding time with his or her mother. Bode points out that for mothers who watch their babies go through withdrawal, “the shame and guilt is immense.”

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Transitional care helps Medicare patients go from hospital to home

Thursday, June 30th, 2016

Some may be completing a course of antibiotics. Some may have a new diagnosis of diabetes and need help learning to manage their disease. Others could be recovering from a fall that caused a broken bone. A variety of Medicare patients spend from five to 20 days in the Transitional Care Unit before they are discharged from Upstate University Hospital. What these older patients have in common is the goal to return to their homes. Medical director Sharon Brangman, MD (at left in photo), says patients on the Transitional Care Unit receive the same type of care they would receive as traditional hospital patients, “but with a different set of goals to help make sure they can get home and stay home.” Nurse Amy Rottger (at right), the unit manager, explains that patients get dressed each morning and share a common dining area as they work toward returning to their typical routine.

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Ordinary people can help deter suicide, experts say

Wednesday, June 22nd, 2016

Asking whether someone is contemplating suicide can be a way to let that person talk about his or her troubles and perhaps find some relief or hope, crisis intervention experts say. Cheryl Giarrusso (at left in photo) and Stephanie Lewis (at right), who both work for the Contact Community Services Crisis Intervention Services program, say a common misconception about suicide is that people should avoid mentioning the word to someone who is suspected of being suicidal. They describe warning signs, the role of social media and how ordinary people can help. Contact runs a 24-hour hotline (315-251-0600) to help prevent suicides as well as community training. 

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Surgery for weight loss; health impact of poverty, violence; caring for those with dementia: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for June 19, 2016

Thursday, June 16th, 2016

June 19, 2016

Surgeon Howard Simon, MD, discusses the connection between weight loss and metabolism, and the effect surgery can have for people with morbid obesity. Researchers Sandra Lane, PhD, and Arnett Haygood-El talk about the impact of poverty and violence on health. Geriatric resource nurses Kaylin Brainerd and Linh Nguyen provide guidance to caregivers of people with dementia.

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Researchers seek answers to how poverty, violence affect health

Friday, June 3rd, 2016

Is street violence an addictive behavior? How does a violence or poverty affect how a child learns, how police deal with crime and how landlords treat tenants? These and other social determinants of health are being studied by Sandra Lane, PhD (at left), a professor of public health at Syracuse University, and Arnett Haygood-El (at right), associate director of the Street Addiction institute Inc. in Syracuse. Health does not exist in a vacuum but as part of a person’s environment, they explain, and they are seeking solutions to the trauma inflicted by violence and poverty. 

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HealthLink on Air radio show/podcast: May 29, 2016

Wednesday, May 25th, 2016

May 29, 2016

Vascular surgeon Michael Costanza, MD, goes over the importance of screening for vascular diseases. Research scientist Stephen Glatt, PhD, discusses the genetic epidemiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. Meaghan Greeley and Tiffany Brec from Vera House talk about strategies for stopping sexual violence.

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HealthLink on Air radio show/podcast: May 22, 2016

Friday, May 20th, 2016

May 22, 2016

Stephen Glatt, PhD, and Seetha Ramanathan, MD, talk about Mental Health First Aid. Nurse Cathy Narcavage-Bradley tells what new and expectant parents need to know. Jennifer Kelly, DO, explains the role of the endocrine system in osteoporosis. Psychologist Rich O’Neill, PhD, provides a “Check Up from the Neck Up.”

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Mental health researchers focus on interplay of nature, nurture

Thursday, May 19th, 2016

The debate over whether nature (genes) or nurture (environment) contributes more to mental and other disorders is moving toward how nature and nurture interact. A genetically predisposed person might be “resilient” and never develop a mental disorder, perhaps because of environmental factors, says Stephen Glatt, PhD, an associate professor of neuroscience and physiology at Upstate. Fast-moving research in this area is also examining whether environmentally acquired traits could then be passed on to one’s children. Glatt is recruiting families with children ages 6 to 12 (both with and without mental health issues) for a large genetic study he is conducting. 

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Mental Health First Aid trains lay people to deal with mentally ill youth

Thursday, May 19th, 2016

The earlier a mental health problem can be identified and dealt with, the better. That is part of the reasoning behind increased funding to expand Mental Health First Aid, a longstanding program in Central New York, say Seetha Ramanathan, MD, (at left in photo) a psychiatrist with the state Office of Mental Health, and Stephen Glatt, PhD, an Upstate associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences (at right). The program, used worldwide, trains lay people to recognize mental problems in young people and direct them to services, while fostering empathy and lessening the stigma of mental illness.

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Survivor brings polio’s legacy of terror, hope to life

Thursday, May 19th, 2016

Polio epidemics, which paralyzed and killed children and terrified parents before Jonas Salk, MD, developed a vaccine, are brought to life by a survivor of a 1953 outbreak. Janice Flood Nichols was a DeWitt first-grader when she and seven classmates were stricken. Three of them, including her twin brother, Frankie, died (the twins are shown on their last birthday before his death, and Nichols is shown at right in a recent photo). Nichols recovered, took part in the Salk vaccine trials of 1954 and today advocates for vaccination against polio and other diseases. She also touches on her mild case of post-polio syndrome, which can attack polio survivors decades later.

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Classes help new, expectant parents learn the basics of baby care

Thursday, May 19th, 2016

Where should a newborn sleep? How much weight should a pregnant woman gain? Is breastfeeding important? The answers to these questions – in its own crib in the parents’ room; probably about 25 pounds but check with your health care provider; and yes, very – are among the topics nurse Cathy Narcavage-Bradley fields as coordinator of Upstate’s Best Beginnings classes. The sessions help expectant and new parents learn about pregnancy, labor, delivery and newborn care.

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