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Archive for the ‘ physical therapy’ Category

HealthLink on Air radio show: Jan. 10, 2016

Thursday, January 7th, 2016

January 10, 2016

Upstate urologist Rakesh Khanna, MD, addresses prostate cancer. Upstate physical medicine and rehabilitation specialists Margaret Turk, MD, and Robert Weber, MD, tell what patients can expect from a rehabilitation team. Syracuse University earth sciences professor Donald Siegel, PhD, explores the scientific evidence on hydraulic fracturing.

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Upstate rehabilitation team provides individual support to patients of all ages

Thursday, January 7th, 2016

Patients of all ages can benefit from rehabilitation after illness or injury. Upstate physical medicine and rehabilitation specialists Robert Weber, MD, and Margaret Turk, MD, explain how each patient has unique challenges, and the goal of the rehabilitation team is to help optimize patient mobility and the ability to care for oneself. “When we are growing up, we have many years to adjust to our skills and our capabilities,” explains Weber. “Someone with a sudden change because of illness or injury has to go through that process in a very truncated way. What comprehensive rehabilitation offers is the support to make that a success.”

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HealthLink on Air radio show: December 6, 2015

Friday, December 4th, 2015

December 6, 2015

radio showPhysical therapist Patrick VanBeveren talks about lifelong brain health. Transplant surgeon Rainer Gruessner, MD, discusses kidney and pancreas transplant options. Pediatricians Travis Hobart, MD, and Joseph Nimeh, MD, explain how food relates to social justice and nutrition.

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Simple steps can keep brain active well into old age

Wednesday, December 2nd, 2015

It’s never too late to maintain an active brain, says Patrick VanBeveren, DPT, the physical therapy supervisor at The Centers at St. Camillus rehabilitation and skilled nursing facility. VanBeveren, who formerly taught at Upstate, explains how physical activity, good nutrition and stress reduction are the “big three” for lifelong brain health. He describes simple ways to start — taking short walks, eliminating any unhealthy food from your diet and setting aside a few minutes to relax on a regular basis.

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Why exercise is important during cancer treatment

Friday, May 22nd, 2015

Cassandra M Terpening, PT, DPT, CSCSExercise can improve cancer patients’ quality of life by helping to maintain strength and energy and feel better overall as they heal, said Cassi Terpening, DPT, a physical therapist at Upstate. Physical therapists help set up an exercise program tailored to the patients’ needs and guide them as they progress. It might involve simply walking and stretching or more vigorous activity. For more information on the rehabilitation program for patients with cancer, visit http://www.upstate.edu/pmr/healthcare/programs/cancer.php.

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Dance classes for people with Parkinson’s

Thursday, November 13th, 2014

A dance class for people with Parkinson’s disease improves balance, gait and strength. Part of the Movement for Healthy Aging program, the classes are held every Thursday, and they are free. For details, email Syracuse University organizer Tumay Tunur, PhD at tumaytunur@yahoo.com

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Building a better ankle brace for flat feet

Wednesday, December 11th, 2013

Christopher G Neville, PT, PhDChristopher Neville, PT, PhD, talks about flatfoot due to Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction (PTTD), one of the most common problems of the foot and ankle.  Neville describes a new clinical trial underway at Upstate to help determine the most appropriate, conservative treatment for PTTD.  
Read more: Upstate study to help determine best conservative treatment for common foot disorder. 
Read about the study: Effect of Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction Specific Braces on Foot. 
For more information, call 315-464-9966

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Boost your brainpower with regular exercise

Thursday, October 24th, 2013

Carol SamesExercise physiologist Carol Sames, PhD discusses recent research that identifies numerous previously unknown ways in which regular exercise reduces the risk of heart disease and cancer, helps control diabetes and boosts brainpower. Sames is the Director of Upstate’s Vitality! program, which was conceived as a natural extension of the programs and activities offered through the traditional health care system. For more information or to enroll in the Vitality! program, call (315) 464-9992.
Read the story: Researchers Explain Why Exercise Works Magic, The Scientific American.

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An overview of adaptive physical education

Friday, October 11th, 2013

James Rimmer, PhDJames Rimmer, PhD, the Lakeshore Foundation Endowed Chair in Health Promotion and Rehabilitation Sciences, was the keynote speaker for a recent conference on adaptive physical education. He shares a broad overview of where we are nationally with adaptive physical education in terms of policy and practice. Dr. Rimmer also directs the National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability. For more information, call 1-800-900-8086.

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Caring for someone with Parkinson’s disease

Wednesday, August 14th, 2013

Dragos L Mihaila, MDCarol Sames, PhDDragos Mihaila, MD, director of the Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders Program at Upstate Medical University is joined by Carol Sames, PhD, director of Upstate’s Vitality Fitness Program, to help us understand Parkinson’s disease, a progressive disorder of the nervous system that affects movement. They stress the importance of exercise and nutritional balance as strategies for living well, and encourage their caregivers to follow that same advice. For more information about the Vitality program, call 315-464-9992.

The Onondaga County Department of Aging and Youth sponsors two groups that meet monthly to provide education and support to patients and families dealing with this disease: On the first Monday of each month, 12:30 – 2 pm, at The Hearth at Greenpoint, 150 Old Liverpool Road, Liverpool; and on the second Tuesday of each month, 6 – 7:30 pm, at The Villas of Summerfield, 100 Summerfield Village Lane, Onondaga Hill off Velasko Road. For information, call 315-435-2362 x140 or email cstevenson@ongov.net.

Listen to the interview: “Living an active life with Parkinson’s disease

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Living an active life with Parkinson’s disease

Monday, August 5th, 2013

Dragos L Mihaila, MDCarol Sames, PhDDragos Mihaila, MD, director of the Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders Program at Upstate Medical University will talk about Parkinson’s disease, a progressive disorder of the nervous system that affects movement  He is joined by Carol Sames, PhD, director of Upstate’s Vitality Fitness Program to describe how people can live an active life with the disease.

The Onondaga County Department of Aging and Youth sponsors two groups that meet monthly to provide education and support to patients and families dealing with this disease: On the first Monday of each month, 12:30 – 2 pm, at The Hearth at Greenpoint, 150 Old Liverpool Road, Liverpool; and on the second Tuesday of each month, 6 – 7:30 pm, at The Villas of Summerfield, 100 Summerfield Village Lane, Onondaga Hill off Velasko Road.  For information, call 315-435-2362 x140 or email cstevenson@ongov.net.

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‘Peds to Parents’ – Ballet therapy for children with Cerebral Palsy

Wednesday, June 12th, 2013

Nienke P Dosa, MD, MPHLisa Neville OTRUpstate developmental pediatrician Nienka Dosa, MD, talks about a new guidebook written by dancers for dancers, using ballet therapy for children with cerebral palsy. She is joined by occupational therapist and ballet instructor Lisa Neville, OT, who is collaborating to put the program into practice at Jowonio preschool, with the help of Syracuse Nottingham high school dancer students.  View the guidebook: Ballet for Children with Cerebral Palsy
The Center for Development, Behavior, and Genetics at Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital.
Read the blog: Peds to Parents – Notes from Upstate Professionals to Parents and Caregivers

To donate to the Madeline Cote Endowment, a fund to support pediatric patients with cerebral palsy and their families during treatment at Upstate Medical University, go to the Foundation for Upstate Medical Universityand search for ‘Cote’.  For more information: 315-464-7561.

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