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Archive for the ‘ nursing’ Category

Transitional care, suicide prevention, lupus overview: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for July 3, 2016

Thursday, June 30th, 2016

July 3, 2016

Geriatrician Sharon Brangman, MD, and nurse Amy Rottger explain the role of transitional care. Representatives from Contact Community Services Crisis Intervention Services discuss suicide prevention. Rheumatologist Hiroshi Kato, MD, provides an overview of lupus. Also, a Check Up From the Neck Up and a selection from The Healing Muse.

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Transitional care helps Medicare patients go from hospital to home

Thursday, June 30th, 2016

Some may be completing a course of antibiotics. Some may have a new diagnosis of diabetes and need help learning to manage their disease. Others could be recovering from a fall that caused a broken bone. A variety of Medicare patients spend from five to 20 days in the Transitional Care Unit before they are discharged from Upstate University Hospital. What these older patients have in common is the goal to return to their homes. Medical director Sharon Brangman, MD (at left in photo), says patients on the Transitional Care Unit receive the same type of care they would receive as traditional hospital patients, “but with a different set of goals to help make sure they can get home and stay home.” Nurse Amy Rottger (at right), the unit manager, explains that patients get dressed each morning and share a common dining area as they work toward returning to their typical routine.

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Keep loved one with Alzheimer’s involved, active, nurses advise

Thursday, June 16th, 2016

Communication and patience are the keys to caring for someone with Alzheimer’s disease, say Linh Nguyen (right) and Kaylin Brainerd (left), geriatric resource nurses at Upstate University Hospital. Start communicating with the loved one when Alzheimer’s is first diagnosed and try to keep him or her involved even as memory fades, they advise. They also offer tips for caregivers, such as trying to live in the loved one’s world – don’t correct their errors or finish their sentences, and try to keep up a routine that includes familiar faces and places and avoids isolation. 

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Surgery for weight loss; health impact of poverty, violence; caring for those with dementia: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for June 19, 2016

Thursday, June 16th, 2016

June 19, 2016

Surgeon Howard Simon, MD, discusses the connection between weight loss and metabolism, and the effect surgery can have for people with morbid obesity. Researchers Sandra Lane, PhD, and Arnett Haygood-El talk about the impact of poverty and violence on health. Geriatric resource nurses Kaylin Brainerd and Linh Nguyen provide guidance to caregivers of people with dementia.

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HealthLink on Air radio show/podcast: May 22, 2016

Friday, May 20th, 2016

May 22, 2016

Stephen Glatt, PhD, and Seetha Ramanathan, MD, talk about Mental Health First Aid. Nurse Cathy Narcavage-Bradley tells what new and expectant parents need to know. Jennifer Kelly, DO, explains the role of the endocrine system in osteoporosis. Psychologist Rich O’Neill, PhD, provides a “Check Up from the Neck Up.”

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Classes help new, expectant parents learn the basics of baby care

Thursday, May 19th, 2016

Where should a newborn sleep? How much weight should a pregnant woman gain? Is breastfeeding important? The answers to these questions – in its own crib in the parents’ room; probably about 25 pounds but check with your health care provider; and yes, very – are among the topics nurse Cathy Narcavage-Bradley fields as coordinator of Upstate’s Best Beginnings classes. The sessions help expectant and new parents learn about pregnancy, labor, delivery and newborn care.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: January 17, 2016

Friday, January 15th, 2016

January 17, 2016

Stephen Graziano, MD, Upstate’s division chief of hematology and oncology, shares what’s new in precision medicine. Upstate’s transplant division chief, Rainer Gruessner, MD, explains how pancreas transplants may help some diabetics. And Upstate’s chief nursing officer, Nancy Page, and nurse practitioner Archie McEvers talk about the pursuit of higher levels of training.

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Demand for additional training by nurses driven by many factors

Thursday, January 14th, 2016

Nurses today are likely to have more training and to seek further training than their counterparts a generation ago, say Upstate’s chief nursing officer, Nancy Page, RN (pictured, right), and clinical coordinator for palliative care, Archie McEvers, NP. The nursing profession recognized that higher levels of training brought higher skill levels and better patient care, Page says. Today’s shorter hospital stays and advances in technology demand nurses with ever higher levels of education and efficiency, so the incentive for additional training will continue, McEvers adds.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: November 29, 2015

Friday, November 27th, 2015

November 29, 2015

Nurse practitioner Katherine “Kitty” Leonard and professor of nursing Melanie Kalman, PhD, discuss research into the meaning of touch to patients undergoing chemotherapy. Registered dietitian nutritionist Maureen Franklin gives an overview of sugars and sweeteners. Pediatric anesthesiologist Joseph Resti, MD, tells about providing anesthesiology to children.

 

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Chemotherapy patients more concerned with bedside manner than painful touching, researchers find

Thursday, November 5th, 2015

An Upstate nurse practitioner was surprised to learn through her own research that patients undergoing chemotherapy are not necessarily bothered by the constant touching they undergo in treatment. What matters more, according to a nursing journal article by nurse practitioner Katherine “Kitty” Leonard (left) and College of Nursing professor Melanie Kalman, PhD, is the quality of the caregiver/patient relationship. Whether a caregiver’s touch is painful or intrusive is less important than whether the caregiver shows respect and dignity, they conclude. READ THE JOURNAL ARTICLE.

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