Archive Posts

Archive for the ‘ infectious disease’ Category

Why immunizations are important for adults, too

Thursday, March 24th, 2016

Do most adults know they need a tetanus booster shot every 10 years? Immunization recommendations can vary according to age, disease and other factors and should be discussed with one’s primary care provider, says Upstate’s family medicine department chair, John Epling, MD, who is among the experts helping to shape those recommendations at the national level. Epling explains changes in this year’s schedule for adults and also the process of reviewing and updating that schedule.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: March 27, 2016

Wednesday, March 23rd, 2016

March 27, 2016

Joan Pellegrino, MD, discusses the role of genetics in rare diseases. Registered dietitian nutritionist Maria Erdman goes over the new food guidelines. John Epling, MD, explains who needs adult immunizations.

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What you need to know about the Zika virus

Thursday, March 3rd, 2016

Most people infected with the mosquito-borne Zika virus show no symptoms, and the disease is not a threat to human life, says Upstate infectious disease expert Timothy Endy, MD. Pregnant women exposed to Zika run the risk of their babies being born with abnormally small heads, which is why the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advises women who are pregnant or planning to become pregnant to avoid the Olympic games in Brazil later this year. Endy says the virus has been transmitted sexually from men to women and appears to be able to live in urine and semen for a month. So far, mosquitoes carrying Zika have been found in 10 or 12 countries in South America, Puerto Rico and the Caribbean. Subtropical mosquitoes feed in the daytime and prefer shady environments, so Endy recommends protecting yourself with insect repellents if you are traveling to those areas.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: March 6, 2016

Thursday, March 3rd, 2016

March 6, 2016

Infectious disease expert Timothy Endy, MD, discusses the Zika virus. Upstate Medical University’s new president, Danielle Laraque-Arena, MD, introduces herself to the community. Colorectal surgeon David Halleran, MD, tells about colorectal cancer prevention. Leslie Kohman, MD, explains a program that offers free kits to test for colorectal cancer.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: January 31, 2016

Friday, January 29th, 2016

January 31, 2016

Upstate urologist Gennady Bratslavsky, MD, joins his patient Erica Searles in telling about a delicate operation to remove a tumor while preserving her adrenal gland. Upstate pediatric rheumatologist Caitlin Sgarlat, DO, and pediatric infectious disease expert Jana Shaw, MD, discuss the diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease.

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Here’s how Lyme disease is diagnosed and treated

Wednesday, January 20th, 2016

Lyme disease is treated successfully with a short course of antibiotics in most cases, but prevention is the key to controlling the disease, say two experts from Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital. Since the bacterial infection is transmitted to humans by deer ticks, people should wear long sleeves and pants when outdoors even in warm weather, as well as check their skin afterward, say Caitlin Sgarlat, DO (at left in photo, with program host Linda Cohen at center, and Jana Shaw, MD), who specializes in rheumatology and integrative medicine, and Jana Shaw, MD, who specializes in infectious diseases. They explain how quick and careful removal of ticks prevents transmission of the disease and why they advise against the long-term use of antibiotics for Lyme disease patients with lingering problems after treatment. They also explain how the disease is diagnosed and its typical symptoms.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: Jan. 3, 2016

Saturday, January 2nd, 2016

January 3, 2016

Upstate cardiologist Harold Smulyan, MD, and infectious disease expert Donald Blair, MD, take a historical look at a deadly heart infection. Upstate assistant vice president Thomas Pelis shares how big institutions, such as Upstate Medical University, are going green. Bioethics and humanities assistant professor Thomas Curran, MD, and associate professor Robert Olick, JD, PhD, discuss the importance of the health care proxy.

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A historical look at a heart condition caused by infection

Thursday, December 17th, 2015

A cardiologist (Harold Smulyan, MD, left) and an infectious disease expert (Donald Blair, MD) from Upstate look at the history of infective endocarditis — an inflammation of the inner lining of the heart and its tissues, usually caused by a bacterial infection — in a paper published in the American Journal of the Medical Sciences. The disease was first reported in the early 1800s, and Smulyan explains that “before the development of antibiotics, this disease was uniformly fatal.” His research identifies a number of famous patients who died from infective endocarditis, including Scottish poet Robert Burns in 1796; composer Gustay Mahler in 1907; German physician Alois Alzheimer, the founding father of neuropathology, in 1915; and silent-screen star Rudolph Valentino in 1926.

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Best flu season advice: Get your flu shot

Monday, November 16th, 2015

The average person’s best protection against the flu is an annual shot, and everyone over the age of six months should get vaccinated, with few exceptions, says Bruce Simmons, MD, director of employee/student health at Upstate Medical University in Syracuse.

Except for people with bad reactions or egg allergies, a shot is the best prevention against this highly contagious influenza virus, which is spread by droplets from infected people and can cause severe fatigue and fever as well as complicate chronic illnesses, Simmons notes. He also advises washing one’s hands and avoiding contact with flu sufferers as addition preventive measures in the October-to-May flu season.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: November 15, 2015

Monday, November 16th, 2015

November 15, 2015

On this week’s edition of Upstate Medical University‘s “HealthLink on Air”: Bruce Simmons, MD, gives an update on preventing the flu this season. Neurologist Antonio Culebras, MD, talks about how to get enough sleep at all stages of life. Psychiatrists Mantosh Dewan, MD, and Swati Shivale, MD, discuss the art and science of prescribing. Psychologist Rich O’Neill, PhD, provides a Check Up from the Neck Up, and literary journal editor Deirdre Neilen, PhD, reads a selection from the “The Healing Muse.”

 

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HealthLink on Air radio show: November 8, 2015

Thursday, November 5th, 2015

November 8, 2015:

On this week’s edition of Upstate Medical University‘s “HealthLink on Air”: Chief program officer Katrina Skeval of the Alzheimer’s Association’s Central New York chapter provides communication strategies for people with dementia. Researcher Anna Stewart-Ibarra, PhD, MPA, discusses how climate affects infectious diseases. Pediatric pulmonologist Zafer Soultan, MD, tells about obstructive sleep apnea in children.

 

 

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Upstate researcher explains efforts to control mosquito-borne dengue fever

Thursday, October 22nd, 2015

Dengue fever, a tropical disease present in subtropical areas of the United States, must be fought on several fronts, such as research, public education and government policy, says Upstate researcher Anna Stewart-Ibarra, PhD, MPA. She is working to find the solution to this mosquito-borne virus through research both in Syracuse and in Ecuador and outlines the effect of climate change and El Niño as well as attempts to control mosquitoes and find a vaccine for this incurable disease.

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