Archive Posts

Archive for the ‘ history’ Category

Survivor brings polio’s legacy of terror, hope to life

Thursday, May 19th, 2016

Polio epidemics, which paralyzed and killed children and terrified parents before Jonas Salk, MD, developed a vaccine, are brought to life by a survivor of a 1953 outbreak. Janice Flood Nichols was a DeWitt first-grader when she and seven classmates were stricken. Three of them, including her twin brother, Frankie, died (the twins are shown on their last birthday before his death, and Nichols is shown at right in a recent photo). Nichols recovered, took part in the Salk vaccine trials of 1954 and today advocates for vaccination against polio and other diseases. She also touches on her mild case of post-polio syndrome, which can attack polio survivors decades later.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: May 8, 2016

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

May 8, 2016

Paramedic Todd Curtis and emergency physician Jeremy Joslin, MD, tell how they provide medical safety oversight for TV wilderness adventure programs. Cardiologist Harold Smulyan, MD, discusses screening of and treatments for high blood pressure. Pediatric cancer researcher William Kerr, PhD, explains his immunotherapy research.

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Paramedic, doctor tell about working for TV wilderness adventure show

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

A love of the wilderness led a paramedic and a doctor to work with the National Geographic Channel adventure series “The Great Human Race.” Todd Curtis (at left in photo), a paramedic who trained at Upstate and now teaches at Upstate, served as medical safety oversight director for the show, which follows two people as they re-create the conditions of early humans in remote locales in Ethiopia, Mongolia and elsewhere. Curtis got long-distance supervision from emergency physician Jeremy Joslin, MD (at right in photo), director of Upstate’s wilderness and expedition medicine program. They describe the challenges of preparing for medical emergencies in remote places.

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Heroin epidemic: tangled roots, many challenges

Wednesday, March 30th, 2016

Finding a treatment program and overcoming an addition to heroin or another opioid is difficult but not impossible, says Ross Sullivan, MD, director of medical toxicology at Upstate Medical University.  Sullivan tells how the effort to control pain medically helped create the current addiction crisis in opioids — drugs derived from the opium poppy (heroin, morphine) or that mimic them synthetically (fentanyl, oxycodone). Recent restrictions on prescription drugs have led to a flood of cheap heroin to fill the gap, he says, and current treatment options are inadequate to fight the high addiction rates. He outlines how the Upstate New York Poison Center (hotline: 800-222-1222) is offering information and help to schools and the general public.

 

 

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HealthLink on Air radio show: Jan. 3, 2016

Saturday, January 2nd, 2016

January 3, 2016

Upstate cardiologist Harold Smulyan, MD, and infectious disease expert Donald Blair, MD, take a historical look at a deadly heart infection. Upstate assistant vice president Thomas Pelis shares how big institutions, such as Upstate Medical University, are going green. Bioethics and humanities assistant professor Thomas Curran, MD, and associate professor Robert Olick, JD, PhD, discuss the importance of the health care proxy.

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A historical look at a heart condition caused by infection

Thursday, December 17th, 2015

A cardiologist (Harold Smulyan, MD, left) and an infectious disease expert (Donald Blair, MD) from Upstate look at the history of infective endocarditis — an inflammation of the inner lining of the heart and its tissues, usually caused by a bacterial infection — in a paper published in the American Journal of the Medical Sciences. The disease was first reported in the early 1800s, and Smulyan explains that “before the development of antibiotics, this disease was uniformly fatal.” His research identifies a number of famous patients who died from infective endocarditis, including Scottish poet Robert Burns in 1796; composer Gustay Mahler in 1907; German physician Alois Alzheimer, the founding father of neuropathology, in 1915; and silent-screen star Rudolph Valentino in 1926.

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The death of President Warren G. Harding

Wednesday, September 24th, 2014

Harold Smulyan, MDCardiologist Harold Smulyan, MD explains his analysis of the unexpected and ambiguous circumstances surrounding the death of President Warren G. Harding. Read the article: The death of President Warren G. Harding. Smulyan is Emeritus Professor of Medicine and professor of curriculum development at Upstate Medical University.

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What you should know about genetic testing

Thursday, June 20th, 2013

Bonnie BraddockUpstate certified genetic counselor Bonnie Braddock, MPH, CGC, explains genetic testing — what it is, when to consider getting tested, and the importance of seeking professional genetic counseling.  Learn more about: The Breast Cancer Program at Upstate Medical University.

 

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Reflections on a 50 year career in maternal and child health

Wednesday, May 15th, 2013

Richard H Aubry, MD, MPH

An encore presentation of Dr. Richard Aubry’s May 2013 interview, in memory of his recent passing.

Retiring obstetrician Richard Aubry, MD, MPH reflects on his 50 year career in maternal and child health, where he estimates he has presided over 8,000 births, taught OB care to over 8,000 medical students, and published 50 scientific publications. Read more about The Center for Maternal & Child Health and The Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Upstate Medical University.

Upstate Medical University released this statement on his passing:

“The Upstate Medical University community is deeply saddened at the loss of a true pioneer in field of women’s health.  Dr. Richard Aubry has been a mentor to multiple generations of physicians interested in public health, baby’s well-being and safe motherhood.  He has been a leader in public health for more than half a century. He has trained hundreds of residents and medical students always with passion and conviction. He was a pioneer in the field of maternal fetal medicine and helped to shape the direction of medical care in obstetrics and Gynecology. He was a skilled diagnostician who developed an amazing bond with patients and a genuine interest in their lives. As a medical community, we have lost one of the best.”

Read the story: Aubry Motherhood Fund established at Foundation for Upstate Medical University

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7/1/12 Reflections from a pioneering female surgeon

Sunday, July 1st, 2012

Patricia Numann, MD Distinguished professor Patricia J. Numann, MD, FACS reflects on her career as a pioneering female surgeon, and shares her insights about how medicine has changed since she was in medical school up to today; and what medicine has taught her.  Dr. Numann was also installed as the 92nd president of the American College of Surgeons in October during the opening of its Clinical Congress in San Francisco.

Pioneering woman surgeon to receive honorary degree at Commencement

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5/6/12 Reflecting on 41 years of teaching anatomy

Friday, May 4th, 2012

N. Barry Berg, PhDBeloved anatomy professor N. Barry Berg is retiring after 41 years of teaching at Upstate. He talks about how he chose this path, the ways in which teaching has changed, and what students have taught him over the years.


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12/11/11 Reflections on John Lennon’s death from a surgery resident who cared for him

Friday, December 9th, 2011

David Halleran, MDOn December 8, 1980, Dr. David Halleran was a surgical resident at Roosevelt Hospital in mid-town Manhattan, when the police brought in a victim of four gunshots. As he cared for the patient, someone looked through the patient’s wallet for identification. The driver’s license read: John Lennon.

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