Archive Posts

Archive for the ‘ heart/cardiovascular’ Category

HealthLink on Air radio show: Jan. 3, 2016

Saturday, January 2nd, 2016

January 3, 2016

Upstate cardiologist Harold Smulyan, MD, and infectious disease expert Donald Blair, MD, take a historical look at a deadly heart infection. Upstate assistant vice president Thomas Pelis shares how big institutions, such as Upstate Medical University, are going green. Bioethics and humanities assistant professor Thomas Curran, MD, and associate professor Robert Olick, JD, PhD, discuss the importance of the health care proxy.

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A historical look at a heart condition caused by infection

Thursday, December 17th, 2015

A cardiologist (Harold Smulyan, MD, left) and an infectious disease expert (Donald Blair, MD) from Upstate look at the history of infective endocarditis — an inflammation of the inner lining of the heart and its tissues, usually caused by a bacterial infection — in a paper published in the American Journal of the Medical Sciences. The disease was first reported in the early 1800s, and Smulyan explains that “before the development of antibiotics, this disease was uniformly fatal.” His research identifies a number of famous patients who died from infective endocarditis, including Scottish poet Robert Burns in 1796; composer Gustay Mahler in 1907; German physician Alois Alzheimer, the founding father of neuropathology, in 1915; and silent-screen star Rudolph Valentino in 1926.

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New screenings for kids include cholesterol, depression, HIV

Thursday, December 10th, 2015

 

Beth Nelsen, MD

New guidelines suggesting that all children be screened for high cholesterol, depression and HIV are based on research showing rising numbers of kids with those problems, explains Upstate pediatrician Beth Nelsen, MD. Ages vary for the screenings — from 9 to 11 for cholesterol, and from 16 to 19 for HIV – which are updated  annually by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Many tests, including for anemia and heart failure, have already been added by pediatricians during checkups, Nelsen said.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: December 6, 2015

Friday, December 4th, 2015

December 6, 2015

radio showPhysical therapist Patrick VanBeveren talks about lifelong brain health. Transplant surgeon Rainer Gruessner, MD, discusses kidney and pancreas transplant options. Pediatricians Travis Hobart, MD, and Joseph Nimeh, MD, explain how food relates to social justice and nutrition.

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Biologic anti-cholesterol drugs offer promise, pose questions

Wednesday, August 12th, 2015

Robert Carhart, MDA new class of drugs is being hailed for its ability to lower LDL, or “bad” cholesterol, and because it can be used by people who cannot tolerate widely used statin drugs. Robert Carhart, MD, an associate professor of medicine and a specialist in cardiology at Upstate, describes how these new injectable drugs, known as PCSK9 inhibitors, help clear artery-clogging LDL. He also discusses their as-yet unknown factors, from high estimated prices to long-tem effects.

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A new way to monitor congestive heart failure

Wednesday, August 12th, 2015

Robert Carhart, MDA decades-old procedure is getting a new use to help patients with congestive heart failure. Bioimpedance, or the resistance of a substance to electrical current, helps doctors monitor the amount of fluid in a patient’s chest, according to Robert Carhart, MD, an associate professor of medicine at Upstate who specializes in cardiology. Using an exterior band or an implanted device, such as a pacemaker, bioimpedance helps determine how much of a diuretic medication the patient needs to maintain a healthy fluid level, with a goal of helping the patient avoid repeated hospitalizations, he said.

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Should menopausal women treat hot flashes with hormones?

Thursday, February 26th, 2015

http://www.upstate.edu/hospital/providers/doctors/?docID=badawysHormone replacement therapy can be an appropriate choice for some women who struggle with the symptoms of menopause, says Shawky Badawy, MD, Upstate’s division chief of reproductive endocrinology and infertility. Many patients ask Badawy about the risk of heart disease and breast cancer, which are important concerns. He says the decision of whether to seek relief from hormones must be made on an individual basis.

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High blood pressure, heart disease threaten women

Monday, February 23rd, 2015

Lorrie Langdon, RNNurse Lorraine Langdon, heart failure program coordinator at Upstate University Hospital, points out that more women than men have died from heart disease in the past three decades in the United States. She also says that more women die from heart disease than die from breast cancer and lung cancer combined. In this interview, she explains the dangers of high blood pressure and heart disease in women. Langdon goes over the common symptoms and encourages women to “know what is normal to you. Listen to your body. If it feels like something you’ve never really had before, you really need to get that checked out.”

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What happens to the heart after weight loss surgery

Wednesday, December 3rd, 2014

Rushikesh ShahPeople who are obese are likely to have fast heart rates. They have high levels of adipokines, cell signaling proteins released by fat cells that can have adverse effects on the cardiovascular system. Fat cells also produce hormones including leptin, which regulates the amount of fat stores in the body and also impacts the cardiovascular system. After weight loss surgery, leptin concentrations drop, and so does a person’s heart rate, says Rushikesh Shah, MD, who is completing his training in internal medicine at Upstate. He wrote a paper on this subject for the BMJ Case Report reminding doctors of this “physiological compensatory change” to help avoid unnecessary diagnostic tests and medical interventions.

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The 7-minute workout

Friday, September 12th, 2014

Carol Sames PhD

Exercise physiologist Carol Sames, PhD, talks about the new ” 7-minutes workout” everyone’s been talking about, and the benefits and contraindications of high intensity circuit training (HICT). Sames is associate professor, College of Health Professions and director of the Vitality! Fitness Program at Upstate Medical University.

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Implantable cardiac defibrillator

Wednesday, July 16th, 2014

Traian Anghel, MDAmy TetraultTraian Anghel, MD is joined by Amy Tetrault, RN, to talk about a new subcutaneous implantable cardiac defibrillator offered at Upstate, that will help regulate abnormal heart rhythms.  Anghel is assistant professor of Medicine at Upstate, and founding partner at the Heart Group of Syracuse, and Tetrault is the associate director, Upstate Heart and Vascular Center.

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What you need to know about atrial fibrillation

Wednesday, June 25th, 2014

Luna Bhatta MD, talks about the causes and treatments of atrial fibrillation, an irregular and often rapid heart rate that commonly causes poor blood flow to the body and can put you at higher risk for a stroke. Symptoms can include heart palpitations, shortness of breath and weakness. Luna is the director of the Heart Rhythm Center and Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology Lab at Upstate. For more information, call 315 464-5973.  Read the “What’s Up at Upstate” blog: Reducing stroke risk in patients with atrial fibrillation

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