Archive Posts

Archive for the ‘ heart/cardiovascular’ Category

HealthLink on Air radio show/podcast: May 29, 2016

Wednesday, May 25th, 2016

May 29, 2016

Vascular surgeon Michael Costanza, MD, goes over the importance of screening for vascular diseases. Research scientist Stephen Glatt, PhD, discusses the genetic epidemiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. Meaghan Greeley and Tiffany Brec from Vera House talk about strategies for stopping sexual violence.

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Dangerous highs: Teens are abusing sprays, cold remedies, antidiarrheals

Thursday, May 12th, 2016

Teenagers looking to get high are abusing easily available household products, says Upstate toxicologist William Eggleston. Hydrocarbons, found in aerosol sprays, are being inhaled and can lead to irregular heart rhythms and “sudden sniffing death syndrome.” Loperamide (brand name: Imodium), an over-the-counter anti-diarrhea drug, is being taken in megadoses for a heroinlike effect. Dextromethorphan, found in cough and cold remedies, acts like the drug PCP in high doses and causes agitation and combativeness. Eggleston, who sees drug overdose cases through the Upstate New York Poison Center, recommends keeping track of drugs around the house and disposing of old ones to help limit access and prevent abuse.

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How vascular disease can lead to muscle problems, heart attacks, strokes

Thursday, May 12th, 2016

Vascular disease, or diseases of the blood vessels, can lead to difficulty walking, heart attacks, strokes and gangrene, explains Upstate vascular surgeon Michael Costanza, MD. Changes in lifestyle habits often help: Don’t smoke, get reasonable exercise, follow a healthy diet, and control any problems with diabetes, cholesterol or blood pressure. Costanza also addressed how vascular disease is diagnosed, who is likely to get it and the importance of screening.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: May 8, 2016

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

May 8, 2016

Paramedic Todd Curtis and emergency physician Jeremy Joslin, MD, tell how they provide medical safety oversight for TV wilderness adventure programs. Cardiologist Harold Smulyan, MD, discusses screening of and treatments for high blood pressure. Pediatric cancer researcher William Kerr, PhD, explains his immunotherapy research.

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Screening needed to detect common, but serious, disease: hypertension

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

High blood pressure is a fairly common condition that can contribute to a stroke, heart attack or vascular problems, and yet it often goes undetected. Since it often shows no symptoms, screening is important to detect it, and treatments are available, says Upstate cardiologist Harold Smulyan, MD. He explains the associated risks, such as smoking, obesity and excessive salt intake, and also who tends to be at higher risk for high blood pressure, also known as hypertension

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HealthLink on Air radio show: April 17, 2016

Thursday, April 14th, 2016

April 17, 2016

Urologist Oleg Shapiro, MD, discusses kidney cancer. Nurses Lorrie Langdon and Michelle Vallelunga tell about atrial fibrillation and its connection to stroke. Wikipedian Lane Rasberry talks about the medical information available at the online encyclopedia.

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Atrial fibrillation: A heart problem that can lead to stroke

Wednesday, April 6th, 2016

Atrial fibrillation, or “a-fib,” is a common heart problem that can greatly increase the risk of stroke, as two Upstate nurses explain. A heart that is in atrial fibrillation is beating too fast, too slow or irregularly, which might allow blood to pool and clot instead of being pumped normally, say Lorraine “Lorrie” Langdon (at right), coordinator of the Heart Failure Program, and Michelle Vallelunga (at left), data coordinator of the Comprehensive Stroke Center at Upstate. Those clots can travel to the brain and cause a stroke. The nurses go over risk factors and how atrial fibrillation is diagnosed and treated, plus what to do if you think someone is experiencing atrial fibrillation or a stroke.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: Jan. 3, 2016

Saturday, January 2nd, 2016

January 3, 2016

Upstate cardiologist Harold Smulyan, MD, and infectious disease expert Donald Blair, MD, take a historical look at a deadly heart infection. Upstate assistant vice president Thomas Pelis shares how big institutions, such as Upstate Medical University, are going green. Bioethics and humanities assistant professor Thomas Curran, MD, and associate professor Robert Olick, JD, PhD, discuss the importance of the health care proxy.

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A historical look at a heart condition caused by infection

Thursday, December 17th, 2015

A cardiologist (Harold Smulyan, MD, left) and an infectious disease expert (Donald Blair, MD) from Upstate look at the history of infective endocarditis — an inflammation of the inner lining of the heart and its tissues, usually caused by a bacterial infection — in a paper published in the American Journal of the Medical Sciences. The disease was first reported in the early 1800s, and Smulyan explains that “before the development of antibiotics, this disease was uniformly fatal.” His research identifies a number of famous patients who died from infective endocarditis, including Scottish poet Robert Burns in 1796; composer Gustay Mahler in 1907; German physician Alois Alzheimer, the founding father of neuropathology, in 1915; and silent-screen star Rudolph Valentino in 1926.

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New screenings for kids include cholesterol, depression, HIV

Thursday, December 10th, 2015

 

Beth Nelsen, MD

New guidelines suggesting that all children be screened for high cholesterol, depression and HIV are based on research showing rising numbers of kids with those problems, explains Upstate pediatrician Beth Nelsen, MD. Ages vary for the screenings — from 9 to 11 for cholesterol, and from 16 to 19 for HIV – which are updated  annually by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Many tests, including for anemia and heart failure, have already been added by pediatricians during checkups, Nelsen said.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: December 6, 2015

Friday, December 4th, 2015

December 6, 2015

radio showPhysical therapist Patrick VanBeveren talks about lifelong brain health. Transplant surgeon Rainer Gruessner, MD, discusses kidney and pancreas transplant options. Pediatricians Travis Hobart, MD, and Joseph Nimeh, MD, explain how food relates to social justice and nutrition.

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HealthLink On Air radio show: August 30, 2015

Wednesday, September 2nd, 2015

HealthLink on Air radio showSurgeon Ajay Jain, MD, provides an update on liver, pancreas and gallbladder surgeries. Cardiologist Robert Carhart, MD, talks about the new drugs for treating high cholesterol. Smoking cessation counselors Cynthia Cary Woods and Theresa Hankin discuss how to kick the habit permanently.

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