Archive Posts

Archive for the ‘ health care’ Category

Help is available for new or expectant mothers with depression, anxiety

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

Postpartum depression and anxiety are fairly common, says Christine Kowaleski (at right in photo), a nurse practitioner who facilitates a support group for new mothers and expectant mothers. Taking part in that group is Heather Sherman (at left in photo) of Baldwinsville, who shares her personal postpartum story of suicidal thoughts and her struggles to find treatment and help others with similar problems. Kowaleski, an associate professor at Crouse Hospital’s Pomeroy College of Nursing, also explains the differences between “baby blues” and postpartum depression and tells how to get help (call 315-470-7940 to register for the free, weekly support group).

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Some thyroid growths might not be cancerous

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

Experts are re-examining whether to consider some slow-growing abnormalities of the thyroid gland as chronic diseases to monitor rather than as cancers to remove immediately, says Scott Albert, MD, division chief of breast, endocrine and plastic surgery at Upstate. Albert also explains the thyroid’s functions, the uses of scans, biopsies and radioactive iodine, and how the vast majority of thyroid cancer patients do well after treatment, which generally involves surgical removal of the gland.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: May 8, 2016

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

May 8, 2016

Paramedic Todd Curtis and emergency physician Jeremy Joslin, MD, tell how they provide medical safety oversight for TV wilderness adventure programs. Cardiologist Harold Smulyan, MD, discusses screening of and treatments for high blood pressure. Pediatric cancer researcher William Kerr, PhD, explains his immunotherapy research.

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Paramedic, doctor tell about working for TV wilderness adventure show

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

A love of the wilderness led a paramedic and a doctor to work with the National Geographic Channel adventure series “The Great Human Race.” Todd Curtis (at left in photo), a paramedic who trained at Upstate and now teaches at Upstate, served as medical safety oversight director for the show, which follows two people as they re-create the conditions of early humans in remote locales in Ethiopia, Mongolia and elsewhere. Curtis got long-distance supervision from emergency physician Jeremy Joslin, MD (at right in photo), director of Upstate’s wilderness and expedition medicine program. They describe the challenges of preparing for medical emergencies in remote places.

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Screening needed to detect common, but serious, disease: hypertension

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

High blood pressure is a fairly common condition that can contribute to a stroke, heart attack or vascular problems, and yet it often goes undetected. Since it often shows no symptoms, screening is important to detect it, and treatments are available, says Upstate cardiologist Harold Smulyan, MD. He explains the associated risks, such as smoking, obesity and excessive salt intake, and also who tends to be at higher risk for high blood pressure, also known as hypertension

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HealthLink on Air radio show: May 1, 2016

Friday, April 29th, 2016

May 1, 2016

Jack Wohlers, PhD, of Centre Syracuse tells about detection and treatment of eating disorders. Rich O’Neill, PhD, talks about how to help a loved one struggling with addiction. Upstate graduate Michael Weiner, MD, discusses an Alzheimer’s disease research project that seeks participants.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: April 24, 2016

Friday, April 22nd, 2016

April 24, 2016

Pediatric urologist Matthew Mason, MD, explains diagnosis and treatment of undescended testicles and other urologic problems that affect babies. Urologist Natasha Ginzburg, MD, discusses pelvic floor disorders affecting women. Urologist JC Trussell, MD, tells about causes and treatments for erectile dysfunction.

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Early detection important for treating eating disorders

Thursday, April 21st, 2016

Eating disorders, such as anorexia, bulimia and binge eating, can be viewed as a way to cope with life changes and stress, says psychologist Jack Wohlers, PhD. These complex disorders often occur during the transition from childhood to adolescence and from adolescence to early adulthood, says Wohlers, the clinical director of Centre Syracuse, a treatment program for adults and teens with eating disorders. He describes the secretive behaviors and shame that can be associated with these disorders and the importance of early detection and treatment.

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Erectile dysfunction is both common and treatable

Thursday, April 14th, 2016

Erectile dysfunction is a common problem that is generally treated with a three-tiered approach, says Upstate urologist JC Trussell, MD. Erectile dysfunction is the persistent inability to achieve or maintain a penile erection for satisfactory sexual performance, Trussell says, and it’s an issue for more men as they get older. He describes the types of ED, contributing factors including stress, diabetes and heart disease, and the usual remedies, starting with medications, then moving to devices if needed, and, as a last option, an implanted prosthesis, all of which have had high rates of success.

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Range of options available to treat pelvic floor disorders in women

Thursday, April 14th, 2016

The pelvic floor is a complex structure that can be the source of disorders as women age and bear children, says Natasha Ginzburg, MD, urologist and director of female pelvic medicine and surgery at Upstate. She describes the pelvic floor as a hammock of muscle and tissue that, in women, includes the vagina, rectum and uterus. Problems with urination, defecation and protruding organs in the pelvic floor can be treated successfully through behavioral changes, physical therapy, medicines and biofeedback, with surgery (generally minimally invasive) as a last choice, she said.

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Undescended testicle more common in premature baby boys

Thursday, April 14th, 2016

An undescended testicle occurs in about 3 percent of full-term baby boys but in as many as 45 percent of boys born prematurely, explains Matthew Mason, MD, a pediatric urologist at Upstate. The reasons why one testicle (or occasionally both) does not find its way to the scrotum are unclear, he says, noting that pediatricians check for this problem in well-child visits. Mason also describes aspects of the condition and possible complications, such as reduced fertility and testicular cancer, as well as treatment options.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: April 17, 2016

Thursday, April 14th, 2016

April 17, 2016

Urologist Oleg Shapiro, MD, discusses kidney cancer. Nurses Lorrie Langdon and Michelle Vallelunga tell about atrial fibrillation and its connection to stroke. Wikipedian Lane Rasberry talks about the medical information available at the online encyclopedia.

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