Archive Posts

Archive for the ‘ health care’ Category

Babies, mothers benefit from breast-feeding

Wednesday, June 22nd, 2016

As scientists have documented the importance of breast-feeding to a baby’s current and future well-being, more American women are opting to breast-feed, says Jayne Charlamb, MD, director of breast health and breast-feeding medicine at Upstate. She says the majority of infants born in America receive some breast milk, but she and other experts would like more babies to be breast-fed for at least six months. Babies who are breast-fed have a lower risk of developing ear infections, some leukemias and obesity. In addition, breast-feeding helps mothers lose their pregnancy weight and adjust their glucose regulation.

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Variety of medications treat advanced prostate cancer

Wednesday, June 22nd, 2016

Most men with prostate cancer can be treated successfully through surgery and/or radiation, but when the cancer has spread to other parts of the body, a systemic approach using medication is often prescribed, says Bernard Poiesz, MD, a professor of medicine at the Upstate Cancer Center. He describes both advances in and limitations of treatments for metastatic prostate cancer, such as hormone therapy, chemotherapy and immunotherapy, which stimulates the body’s immune system to attack the cancer.

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Gastroparesis, other digestive disorders are managed with multidisciplinary approach

Wednesday, June 22nd, 2016

Gastroparesis — a complex condition in which food does not empty out of the stomach properly – can cause nausea and vomiting and eventually lead to a patient barely eating in order to avoid the associated pain. Divey Manocha, MD (at right in photo), an Upstate gastroenterologist, and one of his patients, Rhonda Ferry (at left) of Liverpool, offer a scientific as well as a personal glimpse of the disorder, which often strikes young and middle-aged women and can change a person’s life. Manocha also explains the testing — including manometry — that patients with this and other digestive diseases undergo at his laboratory and the multidisciplinary approach to treatment.

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Breast-feeding, prostate cancer treatments and historical medical photographs: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for June 26, 2016

Wednesday, June 22nd, 2016

June 26, 2016

Jayne Charlamb, MD, explains why more mothers are breast-feeding their babies. Bernard Poiesz, MD, discusses medications to treat advanced prostate cancer. Upstate graduate Stanley Burns, MD, tells about his historical collection of medical photographs and his work advising TV shows.

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Keep loved one with Alzheimer’s involved, active, nurses advise

Thursday, June 16th, 2016

Communication and patience are the keys to caring for someone with Alzheimer’s disease, say Linh Nguyen (right) and Kaylin Brainerd (left), geriatric resource nurses at Upstate University Hospital. Start communicating with the loved one when Alzheimer’s is first diagnosed and try to keep him or her involved even as memory fades, they advise. They also offer tips for caregivers, such as trying to live in the loved one’s world – don’t correct their errors or finish their sentences, and try to keep up a routine that includes familiar faces and places and avoids isolation. 

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Bariatric surgeon explains why diet, exercise not enough to help people with morbid obesity

Thursday, June 16th, 2016

The idea that a morbidly obese person can achieve a healthy weight through willpower alone is outdated, according to Howard Simon, MD, director of bariatric surgery at Upstate. People with morbid obesity (with a body mass index above 40) have a metabolic disease too complicated to treat with just drugs, diet or exercise, he says, and most will regain weight lost through those methods. He explains why bariatric surgery, combined with behavioral changes, has a high rate of long-term success. 

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Medical image archive dates from beginning of photography

Thursday, June 16th, 2016

The Burns Archive contains more than a million medically related photos, such as this one of Dr. William L. Rodman’s Surgical Clinic, Philadelphia, March 26, 1902. (PHOTOGRAPH © STANLEY B. BURNS, MD, and THE BURNS ARCHIVE)

Adviser Stanley Burns, MD (left), instructs actor Clive Owen on historical accuracy on the set of the Cinemax series "The Knick," set in a New York City hospital in 1900. (PHOTOGRAPH BY MARY CYBULSKI / CINEMAX)

A passion for detail and for history led Stanley Burns, MD, to amass an unparalleled collection of medical photos dating back to 1839 and to advise for historical accuracy on major TV series, such as the Cinemax’s “The Knick,” set in 1900, and PBS’s “Mercy Street,” set in the Civil War. Burns, a New York City ophthalmologist who graduated from Upstate Medical University in 1964, said the old photos remind him that what the best medical minds are doing today will look just as strange in 50 or 100 years and that we can’t know what details will seem important in the future. He tells how a rented apartment in Syracuse helped inspire his collection, which he has exhibited around the world, and how he went on to write more than 44 books about medical history as well.

 
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Surgery for weight loss; health impact of poverty, violence; caring for those with dementia: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for June 19, 2016

Thursday, June 16th, 2016

June 19, 2016

Surgeon Howard Simon, MD, discusses the connection between weight loss and metabolism, and the effect surgery can have for people with morbid obesity. Researchers Sandra Lane, PhD, and Arnett Haygood-El talk about the impact of poverty and violence on health. Geriatric resource nurses Kaylin Brainerd and Linh Nguyen provide guidance to caregivers of people with dementia.

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Prostate cancer drugs, dealing with acne, exercise for cancer patients: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for June 12, 2016

Friday, June 10th, 2016

Pharmacist Andrew Burgdorf discusses the variety of medications available to treat prostate cancer. Dermatologist Ramsay Farah, MD, tells about the causes of and treatments for acne. Physical therapist Cassi Terpening explains the benefits of exercise during cancer treatment.

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Researchers seek answers to how poverty, violence affect health

Friday, June 3rd, 2016

Is street violence an addictive behavior? How does a violence or poverty affect how a child learns, how police deal with crime and how landlords treat tenants? These and other social determinants of health are being studied by Sandra Lane, PhD (at left), a professor of public health at Syracuse University, and Arnett Haygood-El (at right), associate director of the Street Addiction institute Inc. in Syracuse. Health does not exist in a vacuum but as part of a person’s environment, they explain, and they are seeking solutions to the trauma inflicted by violence and poverty. 

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Healing Muse continues to explore human side of medicine

Friday, June 3rd, 2016

Using poetry, art and essays to explore how patients, care providers and others view illness and treatment is the guiding spirit behind The Healing Muse, now in its 16th year of publication at Upstate. The journal’s editor, Deirdre Neilen, PhD (at right), offers a look at the latest edition, which includes an award-winning poem by fourth-year medical student Kaitlin Kyi (at left). Kyi reads her work, “Kind of a Bummer,” a meditation on people who leave without saying goodbye, and she and Neilen discuss the insights and feelings the journal explores.

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Good habits can enhance bone health

Thursday, June 2nd, 2016

Men have an advantage over women when it comes to bone health, since they are able to build up stronger bones in their youth. This is why older men are much less likely than older women to get the weaker, thinner bones of osteoporosis. Upstate physical therapist Karen Kemmis specializes in osteoporosis and preventing falls. She explains how people can enhance bone health through exercise and a proper diet or detract from it through smoking, a poor diet and sedentary habits.

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