Archive Posts

Archive for the ‘ health & fitness’ Category

New guidelines say children should be screened for high cholesterol

Thursday, February 4th, 2016

Children between age 9 and 11, and again between 18 and 21, should have their cholesterol checked through a blood test, according to new guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics. Testing previously was reserved for children whose families included a history of high cholesterol, explains Upstate pediatrician Travis Hobart, MD. Now the strategy is to identify cholesterol problems early to allow time to intervene. “Children with high cholesterol are much more likely to become adults with a bad cholesterol profile,” he says.

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Factors that contribute to the childhood obesity epidemic

Thursday, February 4th, 2016

Syracuse University professor Amy Ellen Schwartz, PhD, examines factors that may influence America’s obesity epidemic in schoolchildren. She has looked at physical education, school lunches and the barriers to walking to school. More recently she studied the obesity rates in New York City schools that installed water jets in school cafeterias, which allow kids to quickly fill cups or bottles with cold water. “After the installation of the water jets, obesity rates go down, and weight goes down,” she says. “And we’re convinced it’s a causal relationship because we can compare it with schools that did not get the water jets.” Schwartz specializes in economics in SU’s Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: February 7, 2016

Thursday, February 4th, 2016

February 7, 2016

Upstate registered dietitian nutritionists Carrie Carlton and Cecilia Sansone talk about nutrition in older adults. Upstate pediatrician Travis Hobart, MD, discusses the new cholesterol screening guidelines for children. Syracuse University professor Amy Ellen Schwartz, PhD, addresses obesity and nutrition in schoolchildren.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: January 24, 2016

Wednesday, January 20th, 2016

January 24, 2016

Registered nurse Deb Polmanteer talks about treatment and options for someone with chronic kidney disease. Upstate urologist Dmitriy Nikolavsky, MD, shares his expertise in surgical repair after gender reassignment surgery, and author Terri Cook tells about the memoir she wrote with her husband about their child’s transition. Syracuse University registered dietitian Tanya Horacek, PhD, explores the factors that influence college student weight gain.

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Varied menu, sufficient fluids important in senior citizen diets

Wednesday, January 20th, 2016

Ensuring proper nutrition for senior citizens involves looking at changes in both body and lifestyle, say two registered dietitian nutritionists at Upstate. Decreases in muscle mass, bone density and the sense of smell, coupled with physical illness or depression, contribute to diminished appetite and calories needed, say Carrie Carlton (at right in photo) and Cecilia Sansone. Among their prescriptions are a varied diet of nutrient-rich foods tailored to the individual, sufficient fluids and several small meals as an alternative to three main meals.

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Here’s how Lyme disease is diagnosed and treated

Wednesday, January 20th, 2016

Lyme disease is treated successfully with a short course of antibiotics in most cases, but prevention is the key to controlling the disease, say two experts from Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital. Since the bacterial infection is transmitted to humans by deer ticks, people should wear long sleeves and pants when outdoors even in warm weather, as well as check their skin afterward, say Caitlin Sgarlat, DO (at left in photo, with program host Linda Cohen at center, and Jana Shaw, MD), who specializes in rheumatology and integrative medicine, and Jana Shaw, MD, who specializes in infectious diseases. They explain how quick and careful removal of ticks prevents transmission of the disease and why they advise against the long-term use of antibiotics for Lyme disease patients with lingering problems after treatment. They also explain how the disease is diagnosed and its typical symptoms.

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College students exercise but need to improve ‘eating competence,’ SU dietitian says

Friday, January 15th, 2016

Many students beginning college see a 5 percent increase in their body weight the first semester. And while 60 percent of students adopt an exercise routine, many also develop unhealthy habits, says registered dietitian nutritionist Tanya Horacek, PhD, of Syracuse University’s Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics. She says many students don’t eat enough whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and many have trouble sleeping. During the transition phase that is college, Horacek says, it’s important for students to improve their “eating competence.” “This is a very formidable time. They are learning habits that they will carry into adulthood.”

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HealthLink on Air radio show: Jan. 10, 2016

Thursday, January 7th, 2016

January 10, 2016

Upstate urologist Rakesh Khanna, MD, addresses prostate cancer. Upstate physical medicine and rehabilitation specialists Margaret Turk, MD, and Robert Weber, MD, tell what patients can expect from a rehabilitation team. Syracuse University earth sciences professor Donald Siegel, PhD, explores the scientific evidence on hydraulic fracturing.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: December 27, 2015

Saturday, December 26th, 2015

Professor of psychiatry Stephen Faraone, PhD, provides an update on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Concussion expert Brian Rieger, PhD, tells about winter head injuries. Pulmonologist Lawrence Kurlandsky, MD (retired), explains his research into Christmas tree syndrome. And pediatrician Steven Blatt, MD, discusses what to do about dry skin.

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Reasonable expectations a key to happier holidays

Friday, December 18th, 2015

One source of stress is believing you don’t have enough time, money or energy. Those feelings can hit as people deal with the “extra stuff” of the holiday season, such as socializing, decorating and gift giving, says Upstate psychologist Rich O’Neill, PhD. To keep the holidays positive, he suggests that people set realistic expectations, do what worked well in the past, learn to say no and take time to regroup. Making simple, personal connections is a better idea than aiming for perfection, he adds.

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Check Up From the Neck Up: Encouraging loved ones to quit smoking

Thursday, December 17th, 2015

Upstate psychologist Rich O’Neill, PhD, tells about research showing that what doctors say or don’t say has a big impact on whether someone stops smoking. He says the single best thing you can do for your health is to stop smoking, which likely will add six or seven years to your life. Upstate offers free smoking cessation classes.

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Holiday eating tips include thinking first, choosing well

Monday, December 14th, 2015

Take a moment to think before overeating during the December holiday season and remember you can make healthy choices. That’s the advice of Maureen Franklin, a registered dietitian nutritionist at Upstate, who offers practical tips on how to avoid mindless eating and weight gain while still enjoying yourself.

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