Archive Posts

Archive for the ‘ emergency medicine/trauma’ Category

Researchers seek answers to how poverty, violence affect health

Friday, June 3rd, 2016

Is street violence an addictive behavior? How does a violence or poverty affect how a child learns, how police deal with crime and how landlords treat tenants? These and other social determinants of health are being studied by Sandra Lane, PhD (at left), a professor of public health at Syracuse University, and Arnett Haygood-El (at right), associate director of the Street Addiction institute Inc. in Syracuse. Health does not exist in a vacuum but as part of a person’s environment, they explain, and they are seeking solutions to the trauma inflicted by violence and poverty. 

Play

Dangerous highs: Teens are abusing sprays, cold remedies, antidiarrheals

Thursday, May 12th, 2016

Teenagers looking to get high are abusing easily available household products, says Upstate toxicologist William Eggleston. Hydrocarbons, found in aerosol sprays, are being inhaled and can lead to irregular heart rhythms and “sudden sniffing death syndrome.” Loperamide (brand name: Imodium), an over-the-counter anti-diarrhea drug, is being taken in megadoses for a heroinlike effect. Dextromethorphan, found in cough and cold remedies, acts like the drug PCP in high doses and causes agitation and combativeness. Eggleston, who sees drug overdose cases through the Upstate New York Poison Center, recommends keeping track of drugs around the house and disposing of old ones to help limit access and prevent abuse.

Play

HealthLink on Air radio show: May 15, 2016

Thursday, May 12th, 2016

May 15, 2016

Upstate surgeon Scott Albert, MD, explains the new way of thinking about thyroid cancer. Upstate toxicologist William Eggleston tells of the dangers of hydrocarbons and commonly abused medications. Support group facilitator Christine Kowaleski discusses postpartum depression and psychosis with Central New York mother Heather Sherman.

Play

HealthLink on Air radio show: May 8, 2016

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

May 8, 2016

Paramedic Todd Curtis and emergency physician Jeremy Joslin, MD, tell how they provide medical safety oversight for TV wilderness adventure programs. Cardiologist Harold Smulyan, MD, discusses screening of and treatments for high blood pressure. Pediatric cancer researcher William Kerr, PhD, explains his immunotherapy research.

Play

Paramedic, doctor tell about working for TV wilderness adventure show

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

A love of the wilderness led a paramedic and a doctor to work with the National Geographic Channel adventure series “The Great Human Race.” Todd Curtis (at left in photo), a paramedic who trained at Upstate and now teaches at Upstate, served as medical safety oversight director for the show, which follows two people as they re-create the conditions of early humans in remote locales in Ethiopia, Mongolia and elsewhere. Curtis got long-distance supervision from emergency physician Jeremy Joslin, MD (at right in photo), director of Upstate’s wilderness and expedition medicine program. They describe the challenges of preparing for medical emergencies in remote places.

Play

Atrial fibrillation: A heart problem that can lead to stroke

Wednesday, April 6th, 2016

Atrial fibrillation, or “a-fib,” is a common heart problem that can greatly increase the risk of stroke, as two Upstate nurses explain. A heart that is in atrial fibrillation is beating too fast, too slow or irregularly, which might allow blood to pool and clot instead of being pumped normally, say Lorraine “Lorrie” Langdon (at right), coordinator of the Heart Failure Program, and Michelle Vallelunga (at left), data coordinator of the Comprehensive Stroke Center at Upstate. Those clots can travel to the brain and cause a stroke. The nurses go over risk factors and how atrial fibrillation is diagnosed and treated, plus what to do if you think someone is experiencing atrial fibrillation or a stroke.

Play

Heroin epidemic: tangled roots, many challenges

Wednesday, March 30th, 2016

Finding a treatment program and overcoming an addition to heroin or another opioid is difficult but not impossible, says Ross Sullivan, MD, director of medical toxicology at Upstate Medical University.  Sullivan tells how the effort to control pain medically helped create the current addiction crisis in opioids — drugs derived from the opium poppy (heroin, morphine) or that mimic them synthetically (fentanyl, oxycodone). Recent restrictions on prescription drugs have led to a flood of cheap heroin to fill the gap, he says, and current treatment options are inadequate to fight the high addiction rates. He outlines how the Upstate New York Poison Center (hotline: 800-222-1222) is offering information and help to schools and the general public.

 

 

Play

HealthLink on Air radio show: April 3, 2016

Wednesday, March 30th, 2016

April 3, 2016

Director of medical toxicology Ross Sullivan, MD, provides an update on the heroin epidemic. Registered dietitian nutritionist Kristen Davis explains the value of eating organic foods. Thoracic surgeon Jason Wallen, MD, discusses lung and esophageal cancer.

Play

HealthLink on Air radio show: December 27, 2015

Saturday, December 26th, 2015

Professor of psychiatry Stephen Faraone, PhD, provides an update on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Concussion expert Brian Rieger, PhD, tells about winter head injuries. Pulmonologist Lawrence Kurlandsky, MD (retired), explains his research into Christmas tree syndrome. And pediatrician Steven Blatt, MD, discusses what to do about dry skin.

Play

New stroke team neurosurgeon offers open as well as minimally invasive surgical options

Thursday, November 5th, 2015

The surgical option for patients suffering from stroke used to be limited to traditional open surgery. Advances in radiology have made it possible for specially trained neurosurgeons, called endovascular neurosurgeons, to make repairs from within blood vessels using catheters and guide wires. “With the advent of interventional radiology techniques, we’re finding more ways to get to places that were hard to get to with surgery, and we can get to them very quickly, which is critical for treating a patient who might be having a stroke,” says Grahame Gould, MD, one of the members of the stroke team at Upstate University Hospital. He goes on to say that he is glad to be able to offer both approaches, since minimally invasive procedures are not necessarily the best option for all patients with neurovascular diseases, including stroke. 

Play

Emergency medical responders train for active shooting scenes

Thursday, July 9th, 2015

Active Shooter Test

During a drill at a vacant Syracuse school in March, an Upstate emergency physician (center, dressed in all blue) escorts wounded patients to a safe place for treatment. Rescuers from the Syracuse City Police and Fire Department and paramedics from Rural/Metro Medical Services also participated in the drill.

Christian KnutsenEmergency medical personnel are being trained how to safely enter the scene of an active shooting, rather than waiting on the sidelines, said Christian Knutsen, MD, an assistant professor of emergency medicine at Upstate. This program, still in the planning stage, is part of a nationwide change that encourages police to confront shooters, Knutsen said, and will create “rescue task forces” that include tactical medical responders who can reach and treat the wounded faster.

Play

Proving emergency medical care to those suffering the effects of synthetic marijuana

Thursday, June 11th, 2015

William Paolo, MDPeople who take synthetic marijuana are likely to become severely agitated or severely depressed — and either can imperil a person’s life. William Paolo, MD, says some of his patients at Upstate University Hospital’s emergency department have had to be intubated to protect their breathing ability. Some have suffered heart attacks. Others have had seizures. He cautions against using synthetic marijuana since there’s no way to know what is included in the compound.

Play