Archive Posts

Archive for the ‘ emergency medicine/trauma’ Category

Trauma unit’s specialists ready to treat youngest patients

Thursday, August 25th, 2016

A team of pediatric specialists treats the wide range of trauma that children encounter, says Kim Wallenstein, MD, the new medical director of Upstate’s pediatric trauma unit. Wallenstein, a pediatric surgeon, explains how children who have been injured by anything from bicycle accidents to gunshot wounds are brought in and treated at the only level-one pediatric trauma center in Upstate New York.

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New, kid-friendly emergency department; preventing elder abuse; PTSD research benefits students, veterans: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, Aug. 14, 2016

Thursday, August 11th, 2016

Medical director Richard Cantor, MD, welcomes patients and families to Upstate’s new pediatric emergency department. Jenny Hicks, project coordinator at the nonprofit social service agency Vera House, discusses elder abuse and its prevention. Upstate neuroscientist Stephen Glatt, PhD, talks about the Research Experiences for Undergraduates program, and its focus on trauma and veterans, with student and project manager Ivan Castro.

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Kids now have their own emergency department at Upstate University Hospital

Tuesday, August 9th, 2016
 

(PHOTO BY ABIGAIL MILLER)

Upstate University Hospital has the only emergency department specializing in pediatrics in Central New York. Now, those pediatric emergency specialists provide medical care in a space customized for kids from birth to age 19. The pediatric emergency department is separate from the main emergency department, relocated within the hospital to a unit with 20 patient examination rooms. Each of those rooms has a window and private bathroom. Medical Director Richard Cantor, MD, explains how the new space was designed to provide a comfort zone for patients, their parents and siblings during what can be a time of great stress.
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Prevent drownings through education, awareness of hazards

Friday, July 8th, 2016

Education and awareness underlie the best ways to prevent drowning, says Robert Newmyer, MD, a pediatric critical care physician at Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital. Learning the basics of swimming and water safety is most important, and learning CPR too, if possible, explains Newmyer, who is a former lifeguard and swimming instructor. Other points he discusses include checking for potential hazards in a swimming area, the buddy system, the limits of lifeguards, the concept of “dry drowning” and how children perceive risk.

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Researchers seek answers to how poverty, violence affect health

Friday, June 3rd, 2016

Is street violence an addictive behavior? How does a violence or poverty affect how a child learns, how police deal with crime and how landlords treat tenants? These and other social determinants of health are being studied by Sandra Lane, PhD (at left), a professor of public health at Syracuse University, and Arnett Haygood-El (at right), associate director of the Street Addiction institute Inc. in Syracuse. Health does not exist in a vacuum but as part of a person’s environment, they explain, and they are seeking solutions to the trauma inflicted by violence and poverty. 

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Dangerous highs: Teens are abusing sprays, cold remedies, antidiarrheals

Thursday, May 12th, 2016

Teenagers looking to get high are abusing easily available household products, says Upstate toxicologist William Eggleston. Hydrocarbons, found in aerosol sprays, are being inhaled and can lead to irregular heart rhythms and “sudden sniffing death syndrome.” Loperamide (brand name: Imodium), an over-the-counter anti-diarrhea drug, is being taken in megadoses for a heroinlike effect. Dextromethorphan, found in cough and cold remedies, acts like the drug PCP in high doses and causes agitation and combativeness. Eggleston, who sees drug overdose cases through the Upstate New York Poison Center, recommends keeping track of drugs around the house and disposing of old ones to help limit access and prevent abuse.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: May 15, 2016

Thursday, May 12th, 2016

May 15, 2016

Upstate surgeon Scott Albert, MD, explains the new way of thinking about thyroid cancer. Upstate toxicologist William Eggleston tells of the dangers of hydrocarbons and commonly abused medications. Support group facilitator Christine Kowaleski discusses postpartum depression and psychosis with Central New York mother Heather Sherman.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: May 8, 2016

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

May 8, 2016

Paramedic Todd Curtis and emergency physician Jeremy Joslin, MD, tell how they provide medical safety oversight for TV wilderness adventure programs. Cardiologist Harold Smulyan, MD, discusses screening of and treatments for high blood pressure. Pediatric cancer researcher William Kerr, PhD, explains his immunotherapy research.

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Paramedic, doctor tell about working for TV wilderness adventure show

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

A love of the wilderness led a paramedic and a doctor to work with the National Geographic Channel adventure series “The Great Human Race.” Todd Curtis (at left in photo), a paramedic who trained at Upstate and now teaches at Upstate, served as medical safety oversight director for the show, which follows two people as they re-create the conditions of early humans in remote locales in Ethiopia, Mongolia and elsewhere. Curtis got long-distance supervision from emergency physician Jeremy Joslin, MD (at right in photo), director of Upstate’s wilderness and expedition medicine program. They describe the challenges of preparing for medical emergencies in remote places.

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Atrial fibrillation: A heart problem that can lead to stroke

Wednesday, April 6th, 2016

Atrial fibrillation, or “a-fib,” is a common heart problem that can greatly increase the risk of stroke, as two Upstate nurses explain. A heart that is in atrial fibrillation is beating too fast, too slow or irregularly, which might allow blood to pool and clot instead of being pumped normally, say Lorraine “Lorrie” Langdon (at right), coordinator of the Heart Failure Program, and Michelle Vallelunga (at left), data coordinator of the Comprehensive Stroke Center at Upstate. Those clots can travel to the brain and cause a stroke. The nurses go over risk factors and how atrial fibrillation is diagnosed and treated, plus what to do if you think someone is experiencing atrial fibrillation or a stroke.

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Heroin epidemic: tangled roots, many challenges

Wednesday, March 30th, 2016

Finding a treatment program and overcoming an addition to heroin or another opioid is difficult but not impossible, says Ross Sullivan, MD, director of medical toxicology at Upstate Medical University.  Sullivan tells how the effort to control pain medically helped create the current addiction crisis in opioids — drugs derived from the opium poppy (heroin, morphine) or that mimic them synthetically (fentanyl, oxycodone). Recent restrictions on prescription drugs have led to a flood of cheap heroin to fill the gap, he says, and current treatment options are inadequate to fight the high addiction rates. He outlines how the Upstate New York Poison Center (hotline: 800-222-1222) is offering information and help to schools and the general public.

 

 

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HealthLink on Air radio show: April 3, 2016

Wednesday, March 30th, 2016

April 3, 2016

Director of medical toxicology Ross Sullivan, MD, provides an update on the heroin epidemic. Registered dietitian nutritionist Kristen Davis explains the value of eating organic foods. Thoracic surgeon Jason Wallen, MD, discusses lung and esophageal cancer.

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