Archive Posts

Archive for the ‘ drugs/medications/pharmacy’ Category

Physical activity, positive attitude help combat common yet complex problem of back pain

Wednesday, March 9th, 2016

Back pain strikes most people at some point in their lives, but it’s usually not serious and goes away with little to no treatment, says Adam Rufa, DPT, an assistant professor of physical therapy at Upstate. While back pain’s causes and risk factors are complex and can vary from person to person, the people who deal with it best tend to maintain their physical activities and a positive attitude, Rufa says. He also discusses herniated disks, the use of MRI tests and factors including depression and anxiety.

Play

HealthLink on Air radio show: February 21, 2016

Thursday, February 18th, 2016

February 21, 2016

Orthopedic surgeon Joshua Pletka, MD, discusses common problems with the upper extremities. Ophthalmologist Robert Swan, MD, talks about treatment options for eye inflammation. Neurologist Luis Mejico, MD, provides an overview of migraine headaches.

Play

HealthLink on Air radio show: February 14, 2016

Thursday, February 11th, 2016

February 14, 2016

Upstate radiologist Santiago Miro, MD, tells what’s new in lung cancer screening on this week’s show. Then, Connie Gregory and Aldrine Ashong-Katai tell about a partnership that aims to improve health disparities in public housing neighborhoods, and Upstate pediatric anesthesiologist Joseph Resti, MD, goes over what to expect when a baby or older child faces surgery.

Play

Here’s how Lyme disease is diagnosed and treated

Wednesday, January 20th, 2016

Lyme disease is treated successfully with a short course of antibiotics in most cases, but prevention is the key to controlling the disease, say two experts from Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital. Since the bacterial infection is transmitted to humans by deer ticks, people should wear long sleeves and pants when outdoors even in warm weather, as well as check their skin afterward, say Caitlin Sgarlat, DO (at left in photo, with program host Linda Cohen at center, and Jana Shaw, MD), who specializes in rheumatology and integrative medicine, and Jana Shaw, MD, who specializes in infectious diseases. They explain how quick and careful removal of ticks prevents transmission of the disease and why they advise against the long-term use of antibiotics for Lyme disease patients with lingering problems after treatment. They also explain how the disease is diagnosed and its typical symptoms.

Play

HealthLink on Air radio show: January 17, 2016

Friday, January 15th, 2016

January 17, 2016

Stephen Graziano, MD, Upstate’s division chief of hematology and oncology, shares what’s new in precision medicine. Upstate’s transplant division chief, Rainer Gruessner, MD, explains how pancreas transplants may help some diabetics. And Upstate’s chief nursing officer, Nancy Page, and nurse practitioner Archie McEvers talk about the pursuit of higher levels of training.

Play

HealthLink on Air radio show: December 27, 2015

Saturday, December 26th, 2015

Professor of psychiatry Stephen Faraone, PhD, provides an update on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Concussion expert Brian Rieger, PhD, tells about winter head injuries. Pulmonologist Lawrence Kurlandsky, MD (retired), explains his research into Christmas tree syndrome. And pediatrician Steven Blatt, MD, discusses what to do about dry skin.

Play

A historical look at a heart condition caused by infection

Thursday, December 17th, 2015

A cardiologist (Harold Smulyan, MD, left) and an infectious disease expert (Donald Blair, MD) from Upstate look at the history of infective endocarditis — an inflammation of the inner lining of the heart and its tissues, usually caused by a bacterial infection — in a paper published in the American Journal of the Medical Sciences. The disease was first reported in the early 1800s, and Smulyan explains that “before the development of antibiotics, this disease was uniformly fatal.” His research identifies a number of famous patients who died from infective endocarditis, including Scottish poet Robert Burns in 1796; composer Gustay Mahler in 1907; German physician Alois Alzheimer, the founding father of neuropathology, in 1915; and silent-screen star Rudolph Valentino in 1926.

Play

Early medication seen as key to ADHD treatment

Thursday, December 10th, 2015

Stephen Faraone, PhD

If your child has ADHD, it’s better to start medical treatment early, so the child keeps up with his or her peers, says Stephen Faraone, PhD, a distinguished professor of psychiatry and behavioral science at Upstate. Faraone, an expert in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, explains its many facets, including its tendency to run in families, the reluctance of some people toward medication, and the hopes for genetic research.

Play

IUD, implant among top birth control options for cost, convenience

Thursday, December 10th, 2015

Renee Mestad, MD

For cost-effective birth control that does not require a daily dose, a woman’s best bet is an IUD or an implant, recommends Renee Mestad, MD, division chief of obstetrics and gynecology at Upstate. Mestad offers an overview of currently available contraceptive options, often known as “the pill,” “the patch” or “the ring,” including their drawbacks and benefits
Play

HealthLink on Air radio show: November 29, 2015

Friday, November 27th, 2015

November 29, 2015

Nurse practitioner Katherine “Kitty” Leonard and professor of nursing Melanie Kalman, PhD, discuss research into the meaning of touch to patients undergoing chemotherapy. Registered dietitian nutritionist Maureen Franklin gives an overview of sugars and sweeteners. Pediatric anesthesiologist Joseph Resti, MD, tells about providing anesthesiology to children.

 

Play

HealthLink on Air radio show: November 22, 2015

Friday, November 20th, 2015

November 22, 2015

Gynecologist Renee Mestad, MD, tells about the new medication designed to boost a woman’s libido. Endovascular neurosurgeon Grahame Gould, MD, discusses advances in stroke treatment. Philip Rose, a program coordinator at the Prevention Network of Central New York, provides an update on underage drinking. Orthopedic surgeon William Lavelle, MD, tells how to deal with a muscle pull, or knot, in a shoulder.

Play

So-called ‘female Viagra’ offers limited promise, many side effects

Monday, November 16th, 2015

“The female Viagra” is a misleading name for a new drug for women struggling with low or no sexual desire, and while it shows some promise, it comes with limitations, says Renee Mestad, MD, division chief of general obstetrics and gynecology at Upstate Medical University in Syracuse. Flibanserin, marketed as Addyi, aims to treat the complex problem of female sexual dysfunction by stimulating brain chemicals to enhance desire, while Viagra treats men with sexual desire who are limited by erectile dysfunction.

Women who take Addyi must do so daily, cannot drink alcohol and may experience side effects such as fainting, while possibly gaining only limited results, Mestad says. Still, some experts hope that Addyi may lead to the development of better drugs with fewer side effects.

Play