Archive Posts

Archive for the ‘ drugs/medications/pharmacy’ Category

Bariatric surgeon explains why diet, exercise not enough to help people with morbid obesity

Thursday, June 16th, 2016

The idea that a morbidly obese person can achieve a healthy weight through willpower alone is outdated, according to Howard Simon, MD, director of bariatric surgery at Upstate. People with morbid obesity (with a body mass index above 40) have a metabolic disease too complicated to treat with just drugs, diet or exercise, he says, and most will regain weight lost through those methods. He explains why bariatric surgery, combined with behavioral changes, has a high rate of long-term success. 

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Surgery for weight loss; health impact of poverty, violence; caring for those with dementia: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for June 19, 2016

Thursday, June 16th, 2016

June 19, 2016

Surgeon Howard Simon, MD, discusses the connection between weight loss and metabolism, and the effect surgery can have for people with morbid obesity. Researchers Sandra Lane, PhD, and Arnett Haygood-El talk about the impact of poverty and violence on health. Geriatric resource nurses Kaylin Brainerd and Linh Nguyen provide guidance to caregivers of people with dementia.

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Prostate cancer drugs, dealing with acne, exercise for cancer patients: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for June 12, 2016

Friday, June 10th, 2016

Pharmacist Andrew Burgdorf discusses the variety of medications available to treat prostate cancer. Dermatologist Ramsay Farah, MD, tells about the causes of and treatments for acne. Physical therapist Cassi Terpening explains the benefits of exercise during cancer treatment.

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Dangerous highs: Teens are abusing sprays, cold remedies, antidiarrheals

Thursday, May 12th, 2016

Teenagers looking to get high are abusing easily available household products, says Upstate toxicologist William Eggleston. Hydrocarbons, found in aerosol sprays, are being inhaled and can lead to irregular heart rhythms and “sudden sniffing death syndrome.” Loperamide (brand name: Imodium), an over-the-counter anti-diarrhea drug, is being taken in megadoses for a heroinlike effect. Dextromethorphan, found in cough and cold remedies, acts like the drug PCP in high doses and causes agitation and combativeness. Eggleston, who sees drug overdose cases through the Upstate New York Poison Center, recommends keeping track of drugs around the house and disposing of old ones to help limit access and prevent abuse.

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Bone expert offers overview of osteoporosis, its treatment

Thursday, May 12th, 2016

Many factors can put someone at risk for the bone-weakening conditions of osteopenia and the more serious osteoporosis, says endocrinologist Jennifer Kelly, DO. Among them are a woman’s postmenopausal drop in estrogen, a sedentary lifestyle, smoking and endocrine diseases such as hyperthyroidism, says Kelly, clinical director of the bone density unit at Upstate’s Joslin Diabetes Center. She also describes the lifestyle changes and drugs recommended to treat osteoporosis.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: May 15, 2016

Thursday, May 12th, 2016

May 15, 2016

Upstate surgeon Scott Albert, MD, explains the new way of thinking about thyroid cancer. Upstate toxicologist William Eggleston tells of the dangers of hydrocarbons and commonly abused medications. Support group facilitator Christine Kowaleski discusses postpartum depression and psychosis with Central New York mother Heather Sherman.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: May 8, 2016

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

May 8, 2016

Paramedic Todd Curtis and emergency physician Jeremy Joslin, MD, tell how they provide medical safety oversight for TV wilderness adventure programs. Cardiologist Harold Smulyan, MD, discusses screening of and treatments for high blood pressure. Pediatric cancer researcher William Kerr, PhD, explains his immunotherapy research.

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Screening needed to detect common, but serious, disease: hypertension

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

High blood pressure is a fairly common condition that can contribute to a stroke, heart attack or vascular problems, and yet it often goes undetected. Since it often shows no symptoms, screening is important to detect it, and treatments are available, says Upstate cardiologist Harold Smulyan, MD. He explains the associated risks, such as smoking, obesity and excessive salt intake, and also who tends to be at higher risk for high blood pressure, also known as hypertension

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HealthLink on Air radio show: May 1, 2016

Friday, April 29th, 2016

May 1, 2016

Jack Wohlers, PhD, of Centre Syracuse tells about detection and treatment of eating disorders. Rich O’Neill, PhD, talks about how to help a loved one struggling with addiction. Upstate graduate Michael Weiner, MD, discusses an Alzheimer’s disease research project that seeks participants.

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Erectile dysfunction is both common and treatable

Thursday, April 14th, 2016

Erectile dysfunction is a common problem that is generally treated with a three-tiered approach, says Upstate urologist JC Trussell, MD. Erectile dysfunction is the persistent inability to achieve or maintain a penile erection for satisfactory sexual performance, Trussell says, and it’s an issue for more men as they get older. He describes the types of ED, contributing factors including stress, diabetes and heart disease, and the usual remedies, starting with medications, then moving to devices if needed, and, as a last option, an implanted prosthesis, all of which have had high rates of success.

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Atrial fibrillation: A heart problem that can lead to stroke

Wednesday, April 6th, 2016

Atrial fibrillation, or “a-fib,” is a common heart problem that can greatly increase the risk of stroke, as two Upstate nurses explain. A heart that is in atrial fibrillation is beating too fast, too slow or irregularly, which might allow blood to pool and clot instead of being pumped normally, say Lorraine “Lorrie” Langdon (at right), coordinator of the Heart Failure Program, and Michelle Vallelunga (at left), data coordinator of the Comprehensive Stroke Center at Upstate. Those clots can travel to the brain and cause a stroke. The nurses go over risk factors and how atrial fibrillation is diagnosed and treated, plus what to do if you think someone is experiencing atrial fibrillation or a stroke.

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Heroin epidemic: tangled roots, many challenges

Wednesday, March 30th, 2016

Finding a treatment program and overcoming an addition to heroin or another opioid is difficult but not impossible, says Ross Sullivan, MD, director of medical toxicology at Upstate Medical University.  Sullivan tells how the effort to control pain medically helped create the current addiction crisis in opioids — drugs derived from the opium poppy (heroin, morphine) or that mimic them synthetically (fentanyl, oxycodone). Recent restrictions on prescription drugs have led to a flood of cheap heroin to fill the gap, he says, and current treatment options are inadequate to fight the high addiction rates. He outlines how the Upstate New York Poison Center (hotline: 800-222-1222) is offering information and help to schools and the general public.

 

 

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