Archive Posts

Archive for the ‘ drugs/medications/pharmacy’ Category

Ear infections related to how children develop

Thursday, August 25th, 2016

Ear infections are common in the first few years of life, partly due to how the ear’s eustachian tube develops, explains Haidy Marzouk, MD, an Upstate ear, nose and throat specialist. The tube’s horizontal position make it prone to blockage and fluid buildup, she says, but after age 3 or so, as the tube becomes more vertical, the ear infections become less frequent. She also explains treatment, the use of antibiotics and extreme cases.

Play

Zika virus update; integrative treatment for diabetes; ear infections explained: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, Aug. 28, 2016

Thursday, August 25th, 2016

Aug. 28, 2016

Infectious disease expert Mark Polhemus, MD, provides an update on the Zika virus threat. Haidy Marzouk, MD, goes over pediatric ear infections. Barbara Feuerstein, MD, talks about an integrative approach to diabetes and wellness.

Play

Cancer Moonshot a wide-reaching effort to fight the disease

Thursday, August 25th, 2016

The Cancer Moonshot initiative aims to accelerate, coordinate and improve the understanding, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer. It would involve patients, doctors, drug companies and almost anyone involved with cancer, explains Upstate urologist and cancer researcher Leszek Kotula, MD, PhD. Among its goals are improving the sharing of information, speeding up the approval of new drugs, funding more research and improving access to care for underserved groups, he says.

Play

Less-invasive urinary tract surgery; treating rotator cuff, other shoulder injuries; researching diabetes remedies: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, Aug. 21, 2016

Friday, August 19th, 2016

Urologists Dmitriy Nikolavsky, MD, and Jonathan Riddell, MD, talk about surgical innovations to correct problems with the urinary tract in men, women and children. Orthopedic surgeon L. Ryan Smart, MD, discusses common shoulder injuries and their treatment. Ruth Weinstock, MD, PhD, tells about research that is shaping the way diabetes is managed.

Play

Research offers glimpse into future of diabetes treatments

Friday, August 19th, 2016

Research taking place at Upstate’s Joslin Diabetes Center offers the potential for huge advances in diabetes treatment, says Ruth Weinstock, MD, PhD, Upstate’s chief of endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism. She describes the clinical trials, one of which would create an artificial pancreas by having a blood glucose sensor signal an insulin pump to maintain blood sugar levels automatically. Another looks at whether a gout drug could also protect the kidneys from diabetes damage. People with diabetes or their close relatives who wish to participate in research projects may call 315-464-9007 for more information.

Play

Integrative diabetes treatment deals with whole person, not just disease

Friday, August 19th, 2016

Treating diabetes works best with an integrative approach that deals not just with insulin and blood sugar levels, but lifestyle factors like stress, exercise and eating habits, says Barbara Feuerstein, MD, an endocrinologist at Upstate’s Joslin Diabetes Center. She explains how conventional medicine can be combined with a variety of other treatments, such as acupuncture for stress reduction or yoga for exercise, to help the patient manage the disease and be healthier overall.

 

 

Play

Conservative treatment often resolves rotator cuff injury, a common shoulder problem

Thursday, August 11th, 2016

Shoulder injuries are common, since the joint is used so much in daily life, and orthopedic surgeons have a variety of ways to treat such injuries, explains L. Ryan Smart, MD, a member of Syracuse Orthopedic Specialists and the Upstate Community Campus Orthopedics Group. He describes the structure of the shoulder and focuses on rotator cuff injury, a common problem that often strikes people who use their shoulders repeatedly, such as carpenters, weightlifters and tennis players. Rotator cuff injuries can often be resolved conservatively with drugs to combat the inflammation, and with surgery if that fails. Smart also touches on frozen shoulder, the role of age and family history, the surgical recovery period, shoulder replacement and new medications on the horizon.

Play

Donating one of her kidneys to a stranger; how living donors save lives; a whole-person approach to kicking opioid addiction: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, Aug. 7, 2016

Thursday, August 4th, 2016

Upstate University Hospital nurse Jody Adams tells why she donated one of her kidneys to a woman she had never met. Upstate transplant surgeon Vaughn Whittaker, MD, explains how such kidney donations are saving and improving lives. Upstate psychiatrist Brian Johnson, MD, discusses a holistic treatment for opioid addiction.

Play

Unique approach to opioid addiction treats the whole person

Wednesday, July 27th, 2016

Opioid addiction presents many challenges for the medical world, including how to get people off the drug successfully. Habitual use of these painkilling drugs can make people more sensitive to pain, notes Brian Johnson, MD, director of pain medicine and addiction medicine at Upstate. Johnson, who is also a professor of psychiatry and anesthesiology, explains how opioid use got out of control and how Upstate uses a unique, holistic system to detoxify addicts while dealing with their other medical and psychiatric problems as well.

Play

E-cigarette dangers; how mother’s opiate use affects her baby; doctor, patient views on digestive disorder: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, July 24, 2016

Friday, July 22nd, 2016

July 24, 2016

Respiratory therapist Theresa Hankin goes over the dangers and new regulations of e-cigarettes. Neonatologist Michelle Bode, MD, explains the effect of a mother’s opiate use on her baby. Gastroenterologist Divey Manocha, MD, talks about digestive diseases with one of his patients.

 

 

Play

Transitional care, suicide prevention, lupus overview: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for July 3, 2016

Thursday, June 30th, 2016

July 3, 2016

Geriatrician Sharon Brangman, MD, and nurse Amy Rottger explain the role of transitional care. Representatives from Contact Community Services Crisis Intervention Services discuss suicide prevention. Rheumatologist Hiroshi Kato, MD, provides an overview of lupus. Also, a Check Up From the Neck Up and a selection from The Healing Muse.

Play

Mothers’ opioid use can lead to withdrawal, neonatal abstinence syndrome in newborns

Thursday, June 30th, 2016

A growing number of babies are born to mothers who took a narcotic of some kind during pregnancy, and that puts the babies at risk for developing neonatal abstinence syndrome, says Michelle Bode, MD, an Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital assistant professor and Crouse Hospital neonatologist. Within the first week of life, a baby who was exposed to prescription or nonprescription opioids in the womb may become irritable, have trouble feeding and develop a shrill cry, she says. The baby is likely to have a longer-than-normal hospital stay, which impacts on bonding time with his or her mother. Bode points out that for mothers who watch their babies go through withdrawal, “the shame and guilt is immense.”

Play