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Archive for the ‘ diabetes/endocrine/metabolism’ Category

Less-invasive urinary tract surgery; treating rotator cuff, other shoulder injuries; researching diabetes remedies: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, Aug. 21, 2016

Friday, August 19th, 2016

Urologists Dmitriy Nikolavsky, MD, and Jonathan Riddell, MD, talk about surgical innovations to correct problems with the urinary tract in men, women and children. Orthopedic surgeon L. Ryan Smart, MD, discusses common shoulder injuries and their treatment. Ruth Weinstock, MD, PhD, tells about research that is shaping the way diabetes is managed.

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Research offers glimpse into future of diabetes treatments

Friday, August 19th, 2016

Research taking place at Upstate’s Joslin Diabetes Center offers the potential for huge advances in diabetes treatment, says Ruth Weinstock, MD, PhD, Upstate’s chief of endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism. She describes the clinical trials, one of which would create an artificial pancreas by having a blood glucose sensor signal an insulin pump to maintain blood sugar levels automatically. Another looks at whether a gout drug could also protect the kidneys from diabetes damage. People with diabetes or their close relatives who wish to participate in research projects may call 315-464-9007 for more information.

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Integrative diabetes treatment deals with whole person, not just disease

Friday, August 19th, 2016

Treating diabetes works best with an integrative approach that deals not just with insulin and blood sugar levels, but lifestyle factors like stress, exercise and eating habits, says Barbara Feuerstein, MD, an endocrinologist at Upstate’s Joslin Diabetes Center. She explains how conventional medicine can be combined with a variety of other treatments, such as acupuncture for stress reduction or yoga for exercise, to help the patient manage the disease and be healthier overall.

 

 

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Donating one of her kidneys to a stranger; how living donors save lives; a whole-person approach to kicking opioid addiction: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, Aug. 7, 2016

Thursday, August 4th, 2016

Upstate University Hospital nurse Jody Adams tells why she donated one of her kidneys to a woman she had never met. Upstate transplant surgeon Vaughn Whittaker, MD, explains how such kidney donations are saving and improving lives. Upstate psychiatrist Brian Johnson, MD, discusses a holistic treatment for opioid addiction.

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Living kidney donors greatly needed

Wednesday, July 27th, 2016

The need for living kidney donors is growing, partly because people are living longer on dialysis, explains Vaughn Whittaker, MD, a transplant surgeon at Upstate. Everyone has two kidneys and can live with just one, and a kidney from a live donor tends to be of higher quality, he says. While some people fear live donation, Whittaker explains the safety factors and support system that let almost any healthy adult donate, as well as  breakthroughs like the ability to donate to someone with an incompatible blood type. Questions about kidney donation may be made to Upstate’s transplant clinic at 464-5413.

 

 

 

 

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E-cigarette dangers; how mother’s opiate use affects her baby; doctor, patient views on digestive disorder: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, July 24, 2016

Friday, July 22nd, 2016

July 24, 2016

Respiratory therapist Theresa Hankin goes over the dangers and new regulations of e-cigarettes. Neonatologist Michelle Bode, MD, explains the effect of a mother’s opiate use on her baby. Gastroenterologist Divey Manocha, MD, talks about digestive diseases with one of his patients.

 

 

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Mild cognitive impairment, Zika virus, pancreas transplant recipients: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for July 17, 2016

Friday, July 15th, 2016

July 17, 2016

Neurologist Amy Sanders, MD, explains mild cognitive impairment. Infectious disease specialist Timothy Endy, MD, tells about the Zika virus. Two pancreas transplant recipients share their experiences with diabetes and kidney disease.

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Pancreas recipients overjoyed at prospect of life without diabetes

Thursday, July 14th, 2016

For the first time in their lives, Patrick Nolan, 52 (at left in photo), and Harry Tynan, 39 (at right), are doing what most people take for granted: living without having to constantly check their blood sugar or inject insulin. Each man was diagnosed as a child with Type 1 diabetes and has spent his life dealing with the disease and the kidney damage it can cause. Each man has also received a kidney transplant, and each recently received a transplanted pancreas at Upstate, in effect curing their diabetes. “I’m reliving my youth again. … I just wake up and go, ‘Wow!’“ says Nolan of Syracuse. “It’s a complete change just to look forward and not have to do injections,” notes Tynan of Oswego. “I’m ready to pick up the insulin pen, and I don’t have to.”

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Pancreas transplant an option for people with severe diabetes

Friday, July 8th, 2016

Upstate doctors are now offering a pancreas transplant option for some patients with diabetes, the most common cause of kidney failure. A pancreas transplant may be a proactive way for many with diabetes, especially the more severe cases, to avoid kidney failure, says Rainer Gruessner, MD (at right in photo), Upstate’s transplant chief and professor of surgery. His colleague, surgeon Mark Reza Laftavi, MD (at left), director of Upstate’s Pancreas Transplant Program, describes the dangers diabetes poses to the kidneys and other organs. Gruessner and his team offer pancreas transplants — separately or combined with kidney transplants — and says a pancreas transplant can improve the lives of some patients with diabetes and also halt or reverse some complications. For pancreas transplants, a deceased donor’s organ is implanted in the recipient, who retains his or her original pancreas, which continues to produce digestive enzymes. The new pancreas immediately begins producing insulin.

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Pancreas transplants, preventing drowning, breast cancer/prostate cancer link: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for July 10, 2016

Friday, July 8th, 2016

July 10, 2016

Transplant surgeons Rainer Gruessner, MD, and Mark Laftavi, MD, discuss the pancreas transplant program. Pediatrician Robert Newmyer, MD, talks about drowning and water safety. Urologist Srinivas Vourganti, MD, tells how the “breast cancer gene” increases a man’s risk of prostate cancer.

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Gastroparesis, other digestive disorders are managed with multidisciplinary approach

Wednesday, June 22nd, 2016

Gastroparesis — a complex condition in which food does not empty out of the stomach properly – can cause nausea and vomiting and eventually lead to a patient barely eating in order to avoid the associated pain. Divey Manocha, MD (at right in photo), an Upstate gastroenterologist, and one of his patients, Rhonda Ferry (at left) of Liverpool, offer a scientific as well as a personal glimpse of the disorder, which often strikes young and middle-aged women and can change a person’s life. Manocha also explains the testing — including manometry — that patients with this and other digestive diseases undergo at his laboratory and the multidisciplinary approach to treatment.

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Bariatric surgeon explains why diet, exercise not enough to help people with morbid obesity

Thursday, June 16th, 2016

The idea that a morbidly obese person can achieve a healthy weight through willpower alone is outdated, according to Howard Simon, MD, director of bariatric surgery at Upstate. People with morbid obesity (with a body mass index above 40) have a metabolic disease too complicated to treat with just drugs, diet or exercise, he says, and most will regain weight lost through those methods. He explains why bariatric surgery, combined with behavioral changes, has a high rate of long-term success. 

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