Archive Posts

Archive for the ‘ depression’ Category

Strategies for living with, caring for someone with Alzheimer’s disease

Friday, March 18th, 2016

Upstate geriatrician Andrea Berg, MD, tells what to expect from loved ones with Alzheimer’s disease or another dementia who are likely to struggle with short-term memory, language, reasoning and judgment. She discusses communication techniques, when and how to take the car keys away and the potential perils of wandering, as well as medical issues including depression and incontinence.

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Physical activity, positive attitude help combat common yet complex problem of back pain

Wednesday, March 9th, 2016

Back pain strikes most people at some point in their lives, but it’s usually not serious and goes away with little to no treatment, says Adam Rufa, DPT, an assistant professor of physical therapy at Upstate. While back pain’s causes and risk factors are complex and can vary from person to person, the people who deal with it best tend to maintain their physical activities and a positive attitude, Rufa says. He also discusses herniated disks, the use of MRI tests and factors including depression and anxiety.

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Reasonable expectations a key to happier holidays

Friday, December 18th, 2015

One source of stress is believing you don’t have enough time, money or energy. Those feelings can hit as people deal with the “extra stuff” of the holiday season, such as socializing, decorating and gift giving, says Upstate psychologist Rich O’Neill, PhD. To keep the holidays positive, he suggests that people set realistic expectations, do what worked well in the past, learn to say no and take time to regroup. Making simple, personal connections is a better idea than aiming for perfection, he adds.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: December 20, 2015

Friday, December 18th, 2015

December 20, 2015

Gynecologist Renee Mestad, MD, goes over the current contraceptive options. Psychologist Rich O’Neill, PhD, talks about how to survive holiday stress. Elizabeth Sapio from the  Safe Kids Upstate NY Coalition gives tips on keeping kids safe from accidents at this time of year.

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New screenings for kids include cholesterol, depression, HIV

Thursday, December 10th, 2015

 

Beth Nelsen, MD

New guidelines suggesting that all children be screened for high cholesterol, depression and HIV are based on research showing rising numbers of kids with those problems, explains Upstate pediatrician Beth Nelsen, MD. Ages vary for the screenings — from 9 to 11 for cholesterol, and from 16 to 19 for HIV – which are updated  annually by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Many tests, including for anemia and heart failure, have already been added by pediatricians during checkups, Nelsen said.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: December 13, 2015

Thursday, December 10th, 2015

December 13, 2015

Upstate pediatrician Beth Nelsen, MD, discusses the new screening guidelines for children and adolescents. Health sciences librarian Cristina Pope tells about the Healthy Pets Project. Registered dietitian nutritionist Maureen Franklin gives advice on holiday eating.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: November 1, 2015

Friday, October 30th, 2015

November 1, 2015:

On this week’s edition of Upstate Medical University‘s “HealthLink on Air”: Registered dietitian nutritionist Maureeen Franklin provides a nutrition update. Psychiatrist Thomas Schwartz, MD, gives an overview of bipolar disorder. And gynecologist Howard Weinstein, MD, explains the causes of and treatments for abnormal uterine bleeding.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: October 25, 2015

Thursday, October 22nd, 2015

October 25, 2015:

On this week’s edition of Upstate Medical University‘s “HealthLink on Air”: Pediatrician Ann Botash, MD, addresses child sexual abuse. Project manager Jeanette Zoeckler talks about occupational dangers that low-wage workers face. Psychiatrist Ronald Pies, MD, discusses whether mental illness is linked to violence.

 

 

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Treatments can tame, not cure, bipolar disorder

Friday, September 18th, 2015

Thomas Schwartz, MDBipolar disorder, which provokes dramatic mood swings and can wreck one’s life, is not curable but is treatable, said Thomas Schwartz, MD, vice chair of the Upstate Psychiatry Department. The hallmark of the disorder, also known as manic-depressive illness, is a sustained period of elevated mood, energy and activity that can provoke impulsive and destructive behavior, followed by or mixed with a period of depression. Popular media often focus on the extreme aspects of bipolarity, Schwartz said, adding that maintaining a regular sleep schedule as well as medications and psychiatric treatment can help control the disorder.

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Hospital patients create book to ease troubled minds

Thursday, July 9th, 2015

Rev. Terry Ruth Culbertson The book, “Peace in the Midst of the Storm” offers an opportunity for reflection and hope during hospitalization, as its title suggests. The paperback includes poems, letters and thoughts from psychiatric patients at Upstate, as well as exercises and blank spaces to write one’s own thoughts, according to the Rev. Terry Culbertson of Upstate’s Spiritual Care Department, which conceived the book project to help troubled patients tap into their creativity and find a measure of self-worth as well as excitement. The book will be available through the Spiritual Care Department.

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Social media’s power can overwhelm at-risk individuals, especially teens

Monday, July 6th, 2015

Mirabelle Mattar, MDTheresa Blatchford, MDAlthough social media offers unprecedented opportunities for positive communication, it can also be associated with bullying, depression and even suicide. Upstate’s Mirabelle Mattar, MD, a fellow in child and adolescent psychiatry, and Theresa Blatchford, MD, a fourth-year psychiatry resident, found in their research that teens are especially at risk for these negative effects.

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Checking future doctors for signs of depression, anxiety

Tuesday, June 23rd, 2015

Omar Mousa, MDOmar Mousa, MD, a third-year resident at Upstate, describes his research on a rarely studied topic: depression and anxiety among medical students and medical residents, who are used to checking for such conditions in their patients, not themselves. He explores social stigmas related to depression and stresses the need for those affected to seek help.

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