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New, kid-friendly emergency department; preventing elder abuse; PTSD research benefits students, veterans: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, Aug. 14, 2016

Thursday, August 11th, 2016

Medical director Richard Cantor, MD, welcomes patients and families to Upstate’s new pediatric emergency department. Jenny Hicks, project coordinator at the nonprofit social service agency Vera House, discusses elder abuse and its prevention. Upstate neuroscientist Stephen Glatt, PhD, talks about the Research Experiences for Undergraduates program, and its focus on trauma and veterans, with student and project manager Ivan Castro.

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Kids now have their own emergency department at Upstate University Hospital

Tuesday, August 9th, 2016
 

(PHOTO BY ABIGAIL MILLER)

Upstate University Hospital has the only emergency department specializing in pediatrics in Central New York. Now, those pediatric emergency specialists provide medical care in a space customized for kids from birth to age 19. The pediatric emergency department is separate from the main emergency department, relocated within the hospital to a unit with 20 patient examination rooms. Each of those rooms has a window and private bathroom. Medical Director Richard Cantor, MD, explains how the new space was designed to provide a comfort zone for patients, their parents and siblings during what can be a time of great stress.
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Awareness helps stop often-unreported scourge of elder abuse

Thursday, August 4th, 2016

(PHOTO BY ABIGAIL MILLER)

Elder abuse usually occurs at home at the hands of family members and might be physical, emotional, sexual or financial. It often goes unreported because the victim feels isolated, afraid and ashamed. One way to fight elder abuse is to be aware of its warning signs, explains Jenny Hicks, project coordinator for the Abuse in Later Life program at Vera House, a local domestic and social service agency. Suspected elder abuse can be reported (confidentially, if needed) to the local Adult Protective Services (315-435-2815); Vera House provides services for older adults including a 24-hour crisis and support line: 315-468-3260; and the local Office for the Aging (315-435-2362) also can serve as a resource.

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Donating one of her kidneys to a stranger; how living donors save lives; a whole-person approach to kicking opioid addiction: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, Aug. 7, 2016

Thursday, August 4th, 2016

Upstate University Hospital nurse Jody Adams tells why she donated one of her kidneys to a woman she had never met. Upstate transplant surgeon Vaughn Whittaker, MD, explains how such kidney donations are saving and improving lives. Upstate psychiatrist Brian Johnson, MD, discusses a holistic treatment for opioid addiction.

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Living kidney donors greatly needed

Wednesday, July 27th, 2016

The need for living kidney donors is growing, partly because people are living longer on dialysis, explains Vaughn Whittaker, MD, a transplant surgeon at Upstate. Everyone has two kidneys and can live with just one, and a kidney from a live donor tends to be of higher quality, he says. While some people fear live donation, Whittaker explains the safety factors and support system that let almost any healthy adult donate, as well as  breakthroughs like the ability to donate to someone with an incompatible blood type. Questions about kidney donation may be made to Upstate’s transplant clinic at 464-5413.

 

 

 

 

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Unique approach to opioid addiction treats the whole person

Wednesday, July 27th, 2016

Opioid addiction presents many challenges for the medical world, including how to get people off the drug successfully. Habitual use of these painkilling drugs can make people more sensitive to pain, notes Brian Johnson, MD, director of pain medicine and addiction medicine at Upstate. Johnson, who is also a professor of psychiatry and anesthesiology, explains how opioid use got out of control and how Upstate uses a unique, holistic system to detoxify addicts while dealing with their other medical and psychiatric problems as well.

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Ethics consultants help families navigate tough hospital choices

Wednesday, July 27th, 2016

Life-and-death decisions were once made exclusively by doctors, but nowadays those matters are largely in the hands of patients. This can create conflict as relatives disagree over how to treat a failing patient, for example, and that’s where ethics consultants can help. Two such consultants at Upstate University Hospital – neonatologist Thomas Curran, MD (at right in photo), and attorney Robert Olick, JD, PhD (at left), who are both bioethics and humanities faculty members at Upstate – explain how they try to clarify and resolve the issues and offer non-binding advice. Using a real-life case, they stress the importance of making one’s end-of-life wishes known, in advance, and choosing a health care proxy who will help carry out those wishes.

 

 

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Syndrome can attack polio survivors years later

Wednesday, July 27th, 2016

Polio epidemics are a thing of the past in the U.S., wiped out since the 1950s by vaccines. But some survivors of those epidemics are stricken decades later by post-polio syndrome, which brings back the weakness and pain they battled in their youth. There is no medication for this syndrome, but patients can be helped to manage and stabilize the condition, such as through carefully limited exercises, says neurologist Burk Jubelt, MD, who runs a post-polio syndrome clinic at Upstate. Jubelt, who is  a professor of neurology, microbiology and immunology and the neuroscience graduate program, also gives an overview of polio and describes recent developments in polio vaccines.

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E-cigarette dangers; how mother’s opiate use affects her baby; doctor, patient views on digestive disorder: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, July 24, 2016

Friday, July 22nd, 2016

July 24, 2016

Respiratory therapist Theresa Hankin goes over the dangers and new regulations of e-cigarettes. Neonatologist Michelle Bode, MD, explains the effect of a mother’s opiate use on her baby. Gastroenterologist Divey Manocha, MD, talks about digestive diseases with one of his patients.

 

 

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Mild cognitive impairment, Zika virus, pancreas transplant recipients: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for July 17, 2016

Friday, July 15th, 2016

July 17, 2016

Neurologist Amy Sanders, MD, explains mild cognitive impairment. Infectious disease specialist Timothy Endy, MD, tells about the Zika virus. Two pancreas transplant recipients share their experiences with diabetes and kidney disease.

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E-cigarettes, now under FDA regulation, carry potential dangers

Thursday, July 14th, 2016

Electronic cigarettes, promoted as producing water vapor instead of smoke, actually produce an aerosol with tiny particles that could cause lung problems, says Theresa Hankin, a respiratory therapist at the Upstate Cancer Center. The tobacco-derived liquid in e-cigarettes and related devices contains highly addictive nicotine and traces of elements including heavy metals, Hankin notes. Although some tout the devices as a way to quit smoking, many people end up using both kinds of cigarettes. She notes that much research needs to be done and that the Food and Drug Administration has just begun to regulate the e-cigarette or “vaping” industry, which has been marketing its products to young consumers.

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Prevent drownings through education, awareness of hazards

Friday, July 8th, 2016

Education and awareness underlie the best ways to prevent drowning, says Robert Newmyer, MD, a pediatric critical care physician at Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital. Learning the basics of swimming and water safety is most important, and learning CPR too, if possible, explains Newmyer, who is a former lifeguard and swimming instructor. Other points he discusses include checking for potential hazards in a swimming area, the buddy system, the limits of lifeguards, the concept of “dry drowning” and how children perceive risk.

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