Archive Posts

Archive for the ‘ cancer’ Category

HealthLink on Air radio show: January 17, 2016

Friday, January 15th, 2016

January 17, 2016

Stephen Graziano, MD, Upstate’s division chief of hematology and oncology, shares what’s new in precision medicine. Upstate’s transplant division chief, Rainer Gruessner, MD, explains how pancreas transplants may help some diabetics. And Upstate’s chief nursing officer, Nancy Page, and nurse practitioner Archie McEvers talk about the pursuit of higher levels of training.

Play

New era of precision treatments on horizon for cancer patients

Thursday, January 14th, 2016

Advances in cancer research are ushering in precision treatments designed to be more effective and less toxic to the patient. These treatments aim to zero in on a tumor and are less concerned with where it originated, says Stephen Graziano, MD, Upstate’s division chief of hematology and oncology. This could mean, for example, that a patient takes an oral medicine at home, with less nausea and hair loss than in traditional chemotherapy. Graziano cautions, however, that these treatments tend to be for a small percentage of patients and usually for more advanced cases. The high cost of these precision treatments will also need to be addressed, probably by Congress, he said.

Play

Active surveillance an option for some men with prostate cancer

Wednesday, January 6th, 2016

Rakesh Khanna, MD is interviewed for Upstate's weekly talk radio show, HealthLink on Air.

Men with prostate cancer are often advised to hold off on radical treatment to see whether they can maintain a normal life while a doctor monitors the disease. This strategy of “active surveillance” involves testing and exams, says Upstate urologist Rakesh Khanna, MD, and a less aggressive variation is called “watchful waiting.” Both aim to avoid the incontinence and impotence that can result from surgery or radiation treatment, says Khanna, who also explains the promise and limitations of PSA (prostate-specific antigen) testing to screen for prostate cancer.

Play

HealthLink on Air radio show: November 29, 2015

Friday, November 27th, 2015

November 29, 2015

Nurse practitioner Katherine “Kitty” Leonard and professor of nursing Melanie Kalman, PhD, discuss research into the meaning of touch to patients undergoing chemotherapy. Registered dietitian nutritionist Maureen Franklin gives an overview of sugars and sweeteners. Pediatric anesthesiologist Joseph Resti, MD, tells about providing anesthesiology to children.

 

Play

Chemotherapy patients more concerned with bedside manner than painful touching, researchers find

Thursday, November 5th, 2015

An Upstate nurse practitioner was surprised to learn through her own research that patients undergoing chemotherapy are not necessarily bothered by the constant touching they undergo in treatment. What matters more, according to a nursing journal article by nurse practitioner Katherine “Kitty” Leonard (left) and College of Nursing professor Melanie Kalman, PhD, is the quality of the caregiver/patient relationship. Whether a caregiver’s touch is painful or intrusive is less important than whether the caregiver shows respect and dignity, they conclude. READ THE JOURNAL ARTICLE.

Play

HealthLink On Air radio show: October 4, 2015

Thursday, October 1st, 2015

October 4, 2015:

On this week’s edition of Upstate Medical University’s “HealthLink on Air”: Ramsay Farah, MD, discusses melanoma, the diagnosis former President Jimmy Carter recently disclosed. David Keith, MD, goes over theories of family therapy. Meghan Jacobs, MD, discusses the effects of corporal punishment.

 

Play

Jimmy Carter’s melanoma underscores the importance of early detection, new treatment options

Thursday, September 24th, 2015

Ramsay Farah, MDThe deadliest skin cancer, melanoma, can affect the liver and brain in its later stages, as happened to former President Jimmy Carter, explains Ramsay Farah, MD, division chief of dermatology at Upstate. Caused by pigment-producing cells called melanocytes, melanoma is best treated when caught early, says Farah, who notes the significance of irregular moles and the need for regular skin exams. Farah also details Carter’s cutting-edge treatment, which awakens the body’s immune system to fight the melanoma.

Play

Smoking slips, sexually transmitted virus rises as cause of head and neck cancers

Tuesday, September 1st, 2015

Robert Kellman, MDSeung Shin Hahn, MDSmoking has declined as a cause of head and neck cancers, while those caused by the human papillomavirus have increased, say Upstate’s Robert Kellman, MD, and Seung Shin Hahn, MD. The two physicians describe the symptoms, diagnoses and treatments for cancers of the mouth, throat, lips and larynx in this segment. Kellman is a professor and chair of otolaryngology and communication sciences, and Hahn is a professor of radiation oncology.

Play

How latest techniques help surgeons fight cancer, other diseases of liver, pancreas, gallbladder

Wednesday, August 12th, 2015

Ajay Jain, MDObesity and drug abuse can lead to fatty liver and hepatitis C, which are major factors for developing liver cancer, according to Ajay Jain, MD, associate chief of hepatobiliary and pancreatic surgery at Upstate. Jain, who specializes in cancer surgery, describes the latest procedures – often minimally invasive and robotically assisted — to treat cancers and other diseases of the liver, pancreas, gallbladder and bile ducts. He also reviews promising new research on early detection of pancreatic cancer.

Play

How to relieve pain — for cancer patients and others

Thursday, July 23rd, 2015

Brendan McGinn, MDCancer patients must deal with pain – from tumors pressing against body parts or from their treatments, such as surgery, chemotherapy or radiation. Brendan McGinn, MD, assistant professor of anesthesiology at Upstate, outlines how various types of pain are treated for cancer patients and others and tells how stress and anxiety can worsen pain.

Play

Personalized care for patients needing radiation oncology

Thursday, June 11th, 2015

Anna Shapiro, MDRadiation oncologist Anna Shapiro, MD, explains the multidisciplinary care that breast cancer patients receive at Upstate. She recently receieved the Carol M. Baldwin Breast Cancer Research Fund’s “Humanitarian Award.”

Play

Variety of medicines offers hope to prostate cancer patients

Thursday, May 28th, 2015

Andrew Burgdorf, PharmDThe array of medicines to treat prostate cancer offers more hope than ever before, says Andrew Burgdorf, a clinical pharmacist who works with adult hematology/oncology patients at the Upstate Cancer Center. The treatments include ways to block male hormones as well as attack the cancer cells, he said, and some newer drugs have been shown to help patients live longer. Biosimilar drugs on the horizon could help lower the cost of some therapies.

Play