Archive Posts

Archive for the ‘ cancer’ Category

HealthLink on Air radio show: May 15, 2016

Thursday, May 12th, 2016

May 15, 2016

Upstate surgeon Scott Albert, MD, explains the new way of thinking about thyroid cancer. Upstate toxicologist William Eggleston tells of the dangers of hydrocarbons and commonly abused medications. Support group facilitator Christine Kowaleski discusses postpartum depression and psychosis with Central New York mother Heather Sherman.

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Some thyroid growths might not be cancerous

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

Experts are re-examining whether to consider some slow-growing abnormalities of the thyroid gland as chronic diseases to monitor rather than as cancers to remove immediately, says Scott Albert, MD, division chief of breast, endocrine and plastic surgery at Upstate. Albert also explains the thyroid’s functions, the uses of scans, biopsies and radioactive iodine, and how the vast majority of thyroid cancer patients do well after treatment, which generally involves surgical removal of the gland.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: May 8, 2016

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

May 8, 2016

Paramedic Todd Curtis and emergency physician Jeremy Joslin, MD, tell how they provide medical safety oversight for TV wilderness adventure programs. Cardiologist Harold Smulyan, MD, discusses screening of and treatments for high blood pressure. Pediatric cancer researcher William Kerr, PhD, explains his immunotherapy research.

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Fulbright scholar discusses the role of immunotherapy in curing cancer

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

Pediatric cancer researcher William Kerr, PhD, is heading to France on a Fulbright Scholarship to collaborate with other researchers about ways to prompt the body’s immune system to kill cancer cells. He explains the promising work that takes place in his Upstate laboratory and the accelerated efforts of American scientists to solve cancer by 2020.

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Undescended testicle more common in premature baby boys

Thursday, April 14th, 2016

An undescended testicle occurs in about 3 percent of full-term baby boys but in as many as 45 percent of boys born prematurely, explains Matthew Mason, MD, a pediatric urologist at Upstate. The reasons why one testicle (or occasionally both) does not find its way to the scrotum are unclear, he says, noting that pediatricians check for this problem in well-child visits. Mason also describes aspects of the condition and possible complications, such as reduced fertility and testicular cancer, as well as treatment options.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: April 17, 2016

Thursday, April 14th, 2016

April 17, 2016

Urologist Oleg Shapiro, MD, discusses kidney cancer. Nurses Lorrie Langdon and Michelle Vallelunga tell about atrial fibrillation and its connection to stroke. Wikipedian Lane Rasberry talks about the medical information available at the online encyclopedia.

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What you need to know about kidney cancer

Wednesday, April 6th, 2016

Kidney cancer is often “silent” and discovered when a patient receives an imaging scan for something else, says Oleg Shapiro, MD, vice chair of urology at Upstate. Minimally invasive surgery can usually be done to remove tumors when they are caught early. Shapiro also explains how renal cell carcinoma is the most common type of kidney cancer, how it can be aggressive and what treatments are on the horizon.

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Screening, surgery among tools to fight lung cancer

Wednesday, March 30th, 2016

Screening for lung cancer has greatly reduced the chances of dying from that disease among those most at risk, says Upstate thoracic surgeon Jason Wallen, MD, who also describes other advances in treatment. If lung cancer is caught early, surgery is generally the best option, and it can often be done with small incisions, he says, while chemotherapy might be the best choice for cancer that has spread. Wallen also describes the challenges of diagnosing and treating cancer of the esophagus, which is much less common than lung cancer.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: April 3, 2016

Wednesday, March 30th, 2016

April 3, 2016

Director of medical toxicology Ross Sullivan, MD, provides an update on the heroin epidemic. Registered dietitian nutritionist Kristen Davis explains the value of eating organic foods. Thoracic surgeon Jason Wallen, MD, discusses lung and esophageal cancer.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: March 13, 2016

Wednesday, March 9th, 2016

March 13, 2016

Transfusion expert Matthew Elkins, MD, PhD, discusses bone marrow transplant. Neurosciences doctoral student Patrick Sweeney talks of the connection between emotion, genetics and eating patterns. Radiologist Ravi Adhikary, MD, and radiology director Jennifer Caldwell tell about the merits of 3-D mammography.

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3-D mammography holds promise of better imaging, early breast cancer detection

Friday, March 4th, 2016

A 3-D mammogram – similar to a CT scan – is becoming the new standard in breast cancer screening, experts at Upstate say. Multiple images from various angles can allow a better view into a breast, especially a dense breast, than traditional two-dimensional mammograms, say radiologist Ravi Adhikary, MD, director of the women’s imaging section, and Jennifer Caldwell, director of radiology. While 3-D mammograms are done in addition to 2-D now, in the future, just the 3-D version — with a 2-D version reconstructed from it — will likely be used. This will reduce radiation exposure and discomfort, should reduce false positives and, it is hoped, increase early detection of breast cancer, Adhikary says.

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Transfusion expert tells how bone marrow transplants work

Thursday, March 3rd, 2016

Bone marrow transplants offer hope to chemotherapy and other patients who lack healthy blood cells, and marrow collection methods have improved in recent years, explains Matthew Elkins, MD, PhD, Upstate’s medical director of transfusion medicine. The marrow’s stem cells – needed to grow healthy blood cells – can be harvested from a patient for his or her own later use, from a donor or from a newborn’s discarded umbilical cord, he says, describing how pheresis machines have largely replaced the old needle-drawn method of harvesting. He also urges people to sign up for the national marrow donor registry

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