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Archive for the ‘ cancer’ Category

Pancreas transplants, preventing drowning, breast cancer/prostate cancer link: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for July 10, 2016

Friday, July 8th, 2016

July 10, 2016

Transplant surgeons Rainer Gruessner, MD, and Mark Laftavi, MD, discuss the pancreas transplant program. Pediatrician Robert Newmyer, MD, talks about drowning and water safety. Urologist Srinivas Vourganti, MD, tells how the “breast cancer gene” increases a man’s risk of prostate cancer.

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Inherited gene linked to prostate cancer as well as breast cancer in study

Thursday, June 30th, 2016

A gene mutation linked to breast cancer appears to play a role in some prostate cancer as well, according to a study co-authored by Upstate urologist Srinivas Vourganti, MD. The study looked mostly at the BRCA2 genes, which, when mutated, can lead to breast cancer. When they occur in close relatives, these mutated genes raise the risk of breast cancer for women as well as prostate cancer for men, the study shows, and those prostate cancers tend to be more aggressive. Vourganti explains how a medical student conceived the idea for the study, its implications for African-American men in particular, and how the knowledge might help shape future screenings and treatments.

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Variety of medications treat advanced prostate cancer

Wednesday, June 22nd, 2016

Most men with prostate cancer can be treated successfully through surgery and/or radiation, but when the cancer has spread to other parts of the body, a systemic approach using medication is often prescribed, says Bernard Poiesz, MD, a professor of medicine at the Upstate Cancer Center. He describes both advances in and limitations of treatments for metastatic prostate cancer, such as hormone therapy, chemotherapy and immunotherapy, which stimulates the body’s immune system to attack the cancer.

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Breast-feeding, prostate cancer treatments and historical medical photographs: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for June 26, 2016

Wednesday, June 22nd, 2016

June 26, 2016

Jayne Charlamb, MD, explains why more mothers are breast-feeding their babies. Bernard Poiesz, MD, discusses medications to treat advanced prostate cancer. Upstate graduate Stanley Burns, MD, tells about his historical collection of medical photographs and his work advising TV shows.

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Prostate cancer drugs, dealing with acne, exercise for cancer patients: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for June 12, 2016

Friday, June 10th, 2016

Pharmacist Andrew Burgdorf discusses the variety of medications available to treat prostate cancer. Dermatologist Ramsay Farah, MD, tells about the causes of and treatments for acne. Physical therapist Cassi Terpening explains the benefits of exercise during cancer treatment.

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Doctor, patient, foundation offer views on pain, treatment of pancreatic disease

Thursday, June 2nd, 2016

Diseases of the pancreas, such as pancreatitis, can bring debilitating pain and sometimes lead to cancer. Nuri Ozden, MD (at left), an interventional gastroenterologist at Upstate, discusses the function of the pancreas and diseases that affect it, and he previews Upstate’s planned islet transplant program. One of his patients, Jane Cross (at right), offers a personal view of pancreas disease. She chairs the New York State Chapter of the National Pancreas Foundation, which has recognized Upstate as one of only two hospitals in the state to provide comprehensive, multidisciplinary care for pancreas patients.

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HealthLink on Air radio show/podcast: June 5, 2016

Thursday, June 2nd, 2016

June 5, 2016

Gastroenterologist Nuri Ozden, MD, and Jane Cross, chapter chair for the National Pancreas Foundation, tell about multidisciplinary care for people with pancreatitis. Physical therapist Karen Kemmis provides steps to better bone health. Editor Deirdre Neilen, PhD, shares the new edition of The Healing Muse literary journal.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: May 15, 2016

Thursday, May 12th, 2016

May 15, 2016

Upstate surgeon Scott Albert, MD, explains the new way of thinking about thyroid cancer. Upstate toxicologist William Eggleston tells of the dangers of hydrocarbons and commonly abused medications. Support group facilitator Christine Kowaleski discusses postpartum depression and psychosis with Central New York mother Heather Sherman.

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Some thyroid growths might not be cancerous

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

Experts are re-examining whether to consider some slow-growing abnormalities of the thyroid gland as chronic diseases to monitor rather than as cancers to remove immediately, says Scott Albert, MD, division chief of breast, endocrine and plastic surgery at Upstate. Albert also explains the thyroid’s functions, the uses of scans, biopsies and radioactive iodine, and how the vast majority of thyroid cancer patients do well after treatment, which generally involves surgical removal of the gland.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: May 8, 2016

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

May 8, 2016

Paramedic Todd Curtis and emergency physician Jeremy Joslin, MD, tell how they provide medical safety oversight for TV wilderness adventure programs. Cardiologist Harold Smulyan, MD, discusses screening of and treatments for high blood pressure. Pediatric cancer researcher William Kerr, PhD, explains his immunotherapy research.

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Fulbright scholar discusses the role of immunotherapy in curing cancer

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

Pediatric cancer researcher William Kerr, PhD, is heading to France on a Fulbright Scholarship to collaborate with other researchers about ways to prompt the body’s immune system to kill cancer cells. He explains the promising work that takes place in his Upstate laboratory and the accelerated efforts of American scientists to solve cancer by 2020.

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Undescended testicle more common in premature baby boys

Thursday, April 14th, 2016

An undescended testicle occurs in about 3 percent of full-term baby boys but in as many as 45 percent of boys born prematurely, explains Matthew Mason, MD, a pediatric urologist at Upstate. The reasons why one testicle (or occasionally both) does not find its way to the scrotum are unclear, he says, noting that pediatricians check for this problem in well-child visits. Mason also describes aspects of the condition and possible complications, such as reduced fertility and testicular cancer, as well as treatment options.

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