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Archive for the ‘ aging’ Category

Dance classes for people with Parkinson’s

Thursday, November 13th, 2014

A dance class for people with Parkinson’s disease improves balance, gait and strength. Part of the Movement for Healthy Aging program, the classes are held every Thursday, and they are free. For details, email Syracuse University organizer Tumay Tunur, PhD at tumaytunur@yahoo.com


Expert Advice: When to take an aging loved one’s car keys away

Wednesday, November 5th, 2014

Sharon Brangman, MD

Upstate geriatrician Sharon Brangman, MD, offers advice on how to determine when it’s time to take an aging loved one’s car keys away.


Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders (NICHE) program

Thursday, October 16th, 2014

Kelly Dolan and Deb WillsonRegistered nurses Kelly Dolan and Deb Willson describe the “Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders” (NICHE) program, the largest national geriatric nursing care program for hospitals. As a NICHE-designated hospital, Upstate University Hospital is committed to improving care for geriatric patients. Dolan is the program’s coordinator and Wilson is the clinical training specialist.


Epilepsy in older adults

Thursday, October 9th, 2014

Rebecca O'Dwyer, MDNeurologist Rebecca O’Dwyer, MD, talks about the increase in prevalence of epilepsy among older adults, and how symptoms in the elderly are often not recognized as seizures and thus treated incorrectly. O’Dwyer is a clinical instructor and epilepsy fellow in the Department of Neurology at Upstate Medical University. For more information, call 315 464-4243 and ask for Dr. O’Dwyer.


Staving off Alzheimer’s with exercise

Wednesday, August 6th, 2014

http://www.upstate.edu/search/?tab=people&ID=aversd Dale Avers, DPT, explains that the key to staving off Alzheimer’s is maintaining a healthy brain – through exercise and mental stimulation. Avers is associate professor in the department of Physical Therapy Education, College of Health Professions at Upstate Medical University. Read the story in What’s Up at Upstate blog: How to stave off Alzheimer’s with exercise


Creating a partnership for research on issues related to aging

Wednesday, July 30th, 2014

Sharon Brangman, MD

Upstate geriatrician Sharon Brangman, MD, serves as the principal investigator for a new project that will establish the State of New York (SUNY) Network Aging Partnership (SNAP) to coordinate collaborative research across SUNY’s four medical universities to facilitate competition for scientific funding, accelerate publication of research projects, and recruit and mentor trainees. The partnership will investigate frailty, and ways to enhance lifespan across the health spectrum. In addition to Upstate, project participants include the University at Buffalo, Downstate Medical Center and Stony Brook University. Read the story: Upstate Medical University among nine SUNY campuses to share $900,000 funding


Summer safety for seniors

Wednesday, July 16th, 2014

James Ciaccio, MDEmergency physician James Ciaccio, MD explains how changes in the sensory abilities of seniors may impact their lives, specifically during the summer months, and offers some helpful suggestions. GEM Care, the senior emergency department at Upstate University Hospital’s Community campus, offers special emergency services in a comfortable, quiet, and calming environment especially conducive to seniors.


Understanding the beginning of menopause

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014

Heather ShannonCertified midwife Heather Shannon, CNM, NP, director of  Midwifery and Gynecology at Upstate, helps us understand the symptoms and treatments for menopause and its precursor peri-menopause.  Upstate University Hospital’s Midwifery Program offers personalized care options for women at all ages and stages of life.  Read the story: Tackling Menopause’s Side Effects

For more information, call (315) 492-5875.


Coping with caregiving

Wednesday, December 11th, 2013

Social worker Michael Close, from Hospice of Central New York, offers advice and strategies to be an effective and well prepared caregiver.
Resources: Caregiver Support Services and The Institute for Caregivers, from the Onondaga County Department of Aging and Youth
For more information, call Hospice of CNY at 315-634-1100


The holidays are a chance to check in on aging loved ones

Thursday, November 7th, 2013

Sharon Brangman, MDUpstate geriatrician Sharon Brangman, MD, talks about the importance of assessing how our aging loved ones are getting along on a day-to-day basis, and how the holidays offer an excellent opportunity to do just that.  She will offer suggestions on how to determine their safety, and ways to approach what may be a difficult conversation in a dignified manner. 

University Geriatricians are specialists in the health care of older people and provide outpatient consultations and work in collaboration with the patient’s personal physician and family. You will work with the geriatric team that includes geriatricians – physicians specializing in the care of older patients, fellows in geriatric medicine – physicians learning the specialty of geriatrics, a gerontological social worker, nurse practitioners, and a nurse.

For more information about geriatric care at Upstate, or to schedule a geriatric assessment, call (315) 464-6100. Resources: Caregiver Support Services from the Onondaga County Department of Aging and Youth; Additional resource links


What hospice has to offer at the end of life

Thursday, October 31st, 2013

Judith Setla, MDBill PfohlJudith Setla, MD, medical director for Hospice of Central New York, is joined by communications officer Bill Pfohl to explain hospice care – what it is, and how it can help you and your family deal with the difficult conversations about end-of-life care. Hospice of CNY provides comprehensive comfort care to patients and families through unique interdisciplinary services, bereavement counseling, education and collaboration. For more information, call (315) 634-1100.


Does your loved one need a feeding tube?

Friday, June 14th, 2013

Upstate geriatrician Sharon Brangman, MD, discusses issues surrounding the use of feeding tubes for the end stage of dementia, and ongoing research that shows it may do more harm than good.