Archive Posts

Archive for the ‘ aging’ Category

HealthLink on Air radio show: November 8, 2015

Thursday, November 5th, 2015

November 8, 2015:

On this week’s edition of Upstate Medical University‘s “HealthLink on Air”: Chief program officer Katrina Skeval of the Alzheimer’s Association’s Central New York chapter provides communication strategies for people with dementia. Researcher Anna Stewart-Ibarra, PhD, MPA, discusses how climate affects infectious diseases. Pediatric pulmonologist Zafer Soultan, MD, tells about obstructive sleep apnea in children.




HealthLink on Air radio show: October 18, 2015

Thursday, October 15th, 2015

October 18, 2015:

On this week’s edition of Upstate Medical University’s “HealthLink on Air”: Michael Weiner, MD, explains his research on Alzheimer’s disease and the Brain Health Registry. Neurologist Hesham Masoud, MBBCh, tells about interventional neuroradiology and its role in stroke care. Gail Banach from the Upstate New York Poison Center unveils a new program in Onondaga County for disposing of medical needles and medications.




Effective strategies for communicating with an Alzheimer’s patient combine patience, respect

Friday, October 9th, 2015

Communication can frustrate both a person with Alzheimer’s disease and his or her family and caregivers, but there are ways to help, says Katrina Skeval, chief program officer for the Alzheimer’s Association of Central New York. Patience and respect are the keys to strategies like speaking clearly to the patient, waiting for an answer, asking questions one at a time and not correcting the patient’s faulty memory or speech. Skeval also recomends remaining aware of the patient’s changing abilities and seeking out the free resources offered by groups such as the Alzheimer’s Association. The 24-hour hotline phone number is 800-272-3900.



Upstate alum enlists website in massive project to fight Alzheimer’s disease

Friday, September 25th, 2015

Michael Weiner, MDA leading researcher hopes to monitor millions of people online in a long-term study to find out who is at risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Michael Weiner, MD, a professor at the University of California, San Francisco, has created the website, which encourages people to take free brain function tests twice a year and hopes to find candidates for Alzheimer treatment trials. Weiner, who earned his MD degree at Upstate in 1965, explains how Alzheimer’s differs from normal memory loss and how he helped create the world’s largest Alzheimer’s research project.  


Aging can bring both negative and positive attitudes, SU researcher finds

Monday, July 6th, 2015

Merril Silverstein, Ph.DMerril Silverstein, PhD, a professor of sociology and social work at Syracuse University, describes the decline in people’s “sense of coherence,” or how to find life meaningful and manageable, as they age. His research showed a predictable decline after midlife, but he also found a surprising result that suggests the positive effect of wisdom.


Why running is better than walking

Thursday, January 8th, 2015

Carol Sames, PhDPeople who walk regularly for exercise may notice that their speed declines and they tire more easily as they age.

But is that because they are aging? Could that reduction in walking economy be slowed or reversed by other types of exercise, such as running?

Upstate Medical University exercise physiologist Carol Sames explains how running was found to be more beneficial than walking in an intriguing study that compared walkers and runners in Boulder, Colorado. She says running is not appropriate for everyone, and she offers some other ways walkers can add intensity to their workouts.


Dance classes for people with Parkinson’s

Thursday, November 13th, 2014

A dance class for people with Parkinson’s disease improves balance, gait and strength. Part of the Movement for Healthy Aging program, the classes are held every Thursday, and they are free. For details, email Syracuse University organizer Tumay Tunur, PhD at


Expert Advice: When to take an aging loved one’s car keys away

Wednesday, November 5th, 2014

Sharon Brangman, MD

Upstate geriatrician Sharon Brangman, MD, offers advice on how to determine when it’s time to take an aging loved one’s car keys away.


Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders (NICHE) program

Thursday, October 16th, 2014

Kelly Dolan and Deb WillsonRegistered nurses Kelly Dolan and Deb Willson describe the “Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders” (NICHE) program, the largest national geriatric nursing care program for hospitals. As a NICHE-designated hospital, Upstate University Hospital is committed to improving care for geriatric patients. Dolan is the program’s coordinator and Wilson is the clinical training specialist.


Epilepsy in older adults

Thursday, October 9th, 2014

Rebecca O'Dwyer, MDNeurologist Rebecca O’Dwyer, MD, talks about the increase in prevalence of epilepsy among older adults, and how symptoms in the elderly are often not recognized as seizures and thus treated incorrectly. O’Dwyer is a clinical instructor and epilepsy fellow in the Department of Neurology at Upstate Medical University. For more information, call 315 464-4243 and ask for Dr. O’Dwyer.


Staving off Alzheimer’s with exercise

Wednesday, August 6th, 2014 Dale Avers, DPT, explains that the key to staving off Alzheimer’s is maintaining a healthy brain – through exercise and mental stimulation. Avers is associate professor in the department of Physical Therapy Education, College of Health Professions at Upstate Medical University. Read the story in What’s Up at Upstate blog: How to stave off Alzheimer’s with exercise


Creating a partnership for research on issues related to aging

Wednesday, July 30th, 2014

Sharon Brangman, MD

Upstate geriatrician Sharon Brangman, MD, serves as the principal investigator for a new project that will establish the State of New York (SUNY) Network Aging Partnership (SNAP) to coordinate collaborative research across SUNY’s four medical universities to facilitate competition for scientific funding, accelerate publication of research projects, and recruit and mentor trainees. The partnership will investigate frailty, and ways to enhance lifespan across the health spectrum. In addition to Upstate, project participants include the University at Buffalo, Downstate Medical Center and Stony Brook University. Read the story: Upstate Medical University among nine SUNY campuses to share $900,000 funding