Archive Posts

Archive for the ‘ aging’ Category

HealthLink on Air radio show: February 7, 2016

Thursday, February 4th, 2016

February 7, 2016

Upstate registered dietitian nutritionists Carrie Carlton and Cecilia Sansone talk about nutrition in older adults. Upstate pediatrician Travis Hobart, MD, discusses the new cholesterol screening guidelines for children. Syracuse University professor Amy Ellen Schwartz, PhD, addresses obesity and nutrition in schoolchildren.

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Varied menu, sufficient fluids important in senior citizen diets

Wednesday, January 20th, 2016

Ensuring proper nutrition for senior citizens involves looking at changes in both body and lifestyle, say two registered dietitian nutritionists at Upstate. Decreases in muscle mass, bone density and the sense of smell, coupled with physical illness or depression, contribute to diminished appetite and calories needed, say Carrie Carlton (at right in photo) and Cecilia Sansone. Among their prescriptions are a varied diet of nutrient-rich foods tailored to the individual, sufficient fluids and several small meals as an alternative to three main meals.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: Jan. 10, 2016

Thursday, January 7th, 2016

January 10, 2016

Upstate urologist Rakesh Khanna, MD, addresses prostate cancer. Upstate physical medicine and rehabilitation specialists Margaret Turk, MD, and Robert Weber, MD, tell what patients can expect from a rehabilitation team. Syracuse University earth sciences professor Donald Siegel, PhD, explores the scientific evidence on hydraulic fracturing.

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Check Up From the Neck Up: A honk from above

Thursday, December 17th, 2015

Upstate psychologist Rich O’Neill, PhD, finds inspiration for a nostalgic and poignant recollection that takes him and his listeners from long ago encounter with his father to the present day, evoking the power of memory and the personal associations we all make.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: December 6, 2015

Friday, December 4th, 2015

December 6, 2015

radio showPhysical therapist Patrick VanBeveren talks about lifelong brain health. Transplant surgeon Rainer Gruessner, MD, discusses kidney and pancreas transplant options. Pediatricians Travis Hobart, MD, and Joseph Nimeh, MD, explain how food relates to social justice and nutrition.

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Simple steps can keep brain active well into old age

Wednesday, December 2nd, 2015

It’s never too late to maintain an active brain, says Patrick VanBeveren, DPT, the physical therapy supervisor at The Centers at St. Camillus rehabilitation and skilled nursing facility. VanBeveren, who formerly taught at Upstate, explains how physical activity, good nutrition and stress reduction are the “big three” for lifelong brain health. He describes simple ways to start — taking short walks, eliminating any unhealthy food from your diet and setting aside a few minutes to relax on a regular basis.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: November 8, 2015

Thursday, November 5th, 2015

November 8, 2015:

On this week’s edition of Upstate Medical University‘s “HealthLink on Air”: Chief program officer Katrina Skeval of the Alzheimer’s Association’s Central New York chapter provides communication strategies for people with dementia. Researcher Anna Stewart-Ibarra, PhD, MPA, discusses how climate affects infectious diseases. Pediatric pulmonologist Zafer Soultan, MD, tells about obstructive sleep apnea in children.

 

 

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HealthLink on Air radio show: October 18, 2015

Thursday, October 15th, 2015

October 18, 2015:

On this week’s edition of Upstate Medical University’s “HealthLink on Air”: Michael Weiner, MD, explains his research on Alzheimer’s disease and the Brain Health Registry. Neurologist Hesham Masoud, MBBCh, tells about interventional neuroradiology and its role in stroke care. Gail Banach from the Upstate New York Poison Center unveils a new program in Onondaga County for disposing of medical needles and medications.

 

 

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Effective strategies for communicating with an Alzheimer’s patient combine patience, respect

Friday, October 9th, 2015

Communication can frustrate both a person with Alzheimer’s disease and his or her family and caregivers, but there are ways to help, says Katrina Skeval, chief program officer for the Alzheimer’s Association of Central New York. Patience and respect are the keys to strategies like speaking clearly to the patient, waiting for an answer, asking questions one at a time and not correcting the patient’s faulty memory or speech. Skeval also recomends remaining aware of the patient’s changing abilities and seeking out the free resources offered by groups such as the Alzheimer’s Association. The 24-hour hotline phone number is 800-272-3900.

 

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Upstate alum enlists website in massive project to fight Alzheimer’s disease

Friday, September 25th, 2015

Michael Weiner, MDA leading researcher hopes to monitor millions of people online in a long-term study to find out who is at risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Michael Weiner, MD, a professor at the University of California, San Francisco, has created the website www.brainhealthregistry.org, which encourages people to take free brain function tests twice a year and hopes to find candidates for Alzheimer treatment trials. Weiner, who earned his MD degree at Upstate in 1965, explains how Alzheimer’s differs from normal memory loss and how he helped create the world’s largest Alzheimer’s research project.  

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Aging can bring both negative and positive attitudes, SU researcher finds

Monday, July 6th, 2015

Merril Silverstein, Ph.DMerril Silverstein, PhD, a professor of sociology and social work at Syracuse University, describes the decline in people’s “sense of coherence,” or how to find life meaningful and manageable, as they age. His research showed a predictable decline after midlife, but he also found a surprising result that suggests the positive effect of wisdom.

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Why running is better than walking

Thursday, January 8th, 2015

Carol Sames, PhDPeople who walk regularly for exercise may notice that their speed declines and they tire more easily as they age.

But is that because they are aging? Could that reduction in walking economy be slowed or reversed by other types of exercise, such as running?

Upstate Medical University exercise physiologist Carol Sames explains how running was found to be more beneficial than walking in an intriguing study that compared walkers and runners in Boulder, Colorado. She says running is not appropriate for everyone, and she offers some other ways walkers can add intensity to their workouts.

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