Archive Posts

Archive for the ‘ adolescents’ Category

HealthLink on Air radio show: January 24, 2016

Wednesday, January 20th, 2016

January 24, 2016

Registered nurse Deb Polmanteer talks about treatment and options for someone with chronic kidney disease. Upstate urologist Dmitriy Nikolavsky, MD, shares his expertise in surgical repair after gender reassignment surgery, and author Terri Cook tells about the memoir she wrote with her husband about their child’s transition. Syracuse University registered dietitian Tanya Horacek, PhD, explores the factors that influence college student weight gain.

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College students exercise but need to improve ‘eating competence,’ SU dietitian says

Friday, January 15th, 2016

Many students beginning college see a 5 percent increase in their body weight the first semester. And while 60 percent of students adopt an exercise routine, many also develop unhealthy habits, says registered dietitian nutritionist Tanya Horacek, PhD, of Syracuse University’s Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics. She says many students don’t eat enough whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and many have trouble sleeping. During the transition phase that is college, Horacek says, it’s important for students to improve their “eating competence.” “This is a very formidable time. They are learning habits that they will carry into adulthood.”

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New screenings for kids include cholesterol, depression, HIV

Thursday, December 10th, 2015

 

Beth Nelsen, MD

New guidelines suggesting that all children be screened for high cholesterol, depression and HIV are based on research showing rising numbers of kids with those problems, explains Upstate pediatrician Beth Nelsen, MD. Ages vary for the screenings — from 9 to 11 for cholesterol, and from 16 to 19 for HIV – which are updated  annually by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Many tests, including for anemia and heart failure, have already been added by pediatricians during checkups, Nelsen said.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: December 13, 2015

Thursday, December 10th, 2015

December 13, 2015

Upstate pediatrician Beth Nelsen, MD, discusses the new screening guidelines for children and adolescents. Health sciences librarian Cristina Pope tells about the Healthy Pets Project. Registered dietitian nutritionist Maureen Franklin gives advice on holiday eating.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: November 22, 2015

Friday, November 20th, 2015

November 22, 2015

Gynecologist Renee Mestad, MD, tells about the new medication designed to boost a woman’s libido. Endovascular neurosurgeon Grahame Gould, MD, discusses advances in stroke treatment. Philip Rose, a program coordinator at the Prevention Network of Central New York, provides an update on underage drinking. Orthopedic surgeon William Lavelle, MD, tells how to deal with a muscle pull, or knot, in a shoulder.

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Children facing surgery benefit from care from pediatric anesthesiologists

Friday, November 20th, 2015

Children are not just small adults, which explains the need for pediatric anesthesiologists like Upstate’s Joseph Resti, MD. Children – from newborns to teens — present special challenges when undergoing anesthesia, Resti says, explaining the additional training needed for his subspecialty. Resti also addresses parental concerns, safety improvements and a study underway to see whether anesthesia presents any long-term effects on children.

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Sleep problems among children are common, sometimes avoidable

Thursday, October 15th, 2015

Zafer Soultan, MD

Up to half of children have poor sleeping habits and behaviors, with about 10 percent having an actual disorder, says Zafer Soultan, MD, director of pediatric pulmonary and sleep medicine at Upstate’s Golisano Children’s Hospital. Sometimes these issues stem from physical problems, but often they involve youngsters who never learn to sleep alone, says Soultan, who also describes how disorders such as apnea can be diagnosed in Upstate’s pediatric sleep lab and how teens can display sleep problems as their body’s rhythms clash with school schedules.

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Most teens avoid alcohol, but a quarter of underage youth still drink, sometimes bingeing

Friday, October 9th, 2015

Host Linda Cohen with Philip Rose

Even though the message that alcohol can harm young people is getting through, a quarter of those under the legal age still drink alcohol. Among them, binge drinking and a rise in female drinking have been noted, according to Philip Rose, program coordinator for underage drinking for the Prevention Network of Central New York. Bad decisions, risky behaviors and harm to the still-developing adolescent brain are all consequences of alcohol use, and peer and other pressures glamorize alcohol, Rose says. Still, he says, parents, teachers and other adults can wield influence by modeling good behavior, developing a trusting relationship with their children and talking frankly about alcohol.

 

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Help is available to recognize, report suspected child abuse

Thursday, October 1st, 2015

Although it’s often difficult to detect, child abuse does leave signs – odd bruises, sudden emotional changes – and concerned adults have both a state hotline and local organizations that offer help, says pediatrician Ann Botash, MD of the Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital.

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Pediatrician warns of dangers of not vaccinating children

Thursday, October 1st, 2015

Illness and even death can result when children go unvaccinated, says Jana Shaw, MD, MPH, an associate professor of pediatrics and an infectious disease specialist at Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital. Modern vaccines are extremely safe – they do not cause autism — and are designed to be given on a certain schedule, she says, explaining how unvaccinated children contributed to a measles outbreak in California. Shaw advises parents to follow reliable medical advice and to check with their doctor or school about children’s required vaccines.

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Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital adds integrative medicine to pediatric rheumatology division

Thursday, October 1st, 2015

Alternative or integrative therapies — from homeopathy and nutritional counseling to yoga and deep breathing — can enhance conventional Western medicine, explains Caitlin Sgarlat Deluca, DO, an assistant professor of pediatrics at Upstate who works in the recently created Division of Pediatric Rheumatology and Integrative Medicine in the Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital. The marriage of the two approaches to medicine aims to treat the whole child, says Sgarlat Deluca, who tells how nutritional supplements or acupuncture, for example, helps the arthritis and lupus patients she often sees as a pediatric rheumatologist.

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Pediatric expert tells how to detect child abuse, sexual abuse

Thursday, October 1st, 2015

Child abuse can take many, often hidden, forms, and overcoming it requires victims to learn how to trust and not to blame themselves, according to Ann Botash, MD, professor of pediatrics at Upstate, co-director of the Child Abuse Referral and Evaluation Program and medical director of the McMahon/Ryan Child Advocacy Center. She describes the signs of neglect and physical, emotional and sexual abuse and shares a five-point guideline: learn the facts, minimize opportunities, talk about it, recognize the signs and react responsibly. She recently appeared in a TLC program about child sexual abuse called “Breaking the Silence.” 

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