Archive Posts

Archive for the ‘ adolescents’ Category

New guidelines say children should be screened for high cholesterol

Thursday, February 4th, 2016

Children between age 9 and 11, and again between 18 and 21, should have their cholesterol checked through a blood test, according to new guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics. Testing previously was reserved for children whose families included a history of high cholesterol, explains Upstate pediatrician Travis Hobart, MD. Now the strategy is to identify cholesterol problems early to allow time to intervene. “Children with high cholesterol are much more likely to become adults with a bad cholesterol profile,” he says.

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Factors that contribute to the childhood obesity epidemic

Thursday, February 4th, 2016

Syracuse University professor Amy Ellen Schwartz, PhD, examines factors that may influence America’s obesity epidemic in schoolchildren. She has looked at physical education, school lunches and the barriers to walking to school. More recently she studied the obesity rates in New York City schools that installed water jets in school cafeterias, which allow kids to quickly fill cups or bottles with cold water. “After the installation of the water jets, obesity rates go down, and weight goes down,” she says. “And we’re convinced it’s a causal relationship because we can compare it with schools that did not get the water jets.” Schwartz specializes in economics in SU’s Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: February 7, 2016

Thursday, February 4th, 2016

February 7, 2016

Upstate registered dietitian nutritionists Carrie Carlton and Cecilia Sansone talk about nutrition in older adults. Upstate pediatrician Travis Hobart, MD, discusses the new cholesterol screening guidelines for children. Syracuse University professor Amy Ellen Schwartz, PhD, addresses obesity and nutrition in schoolchildren.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: January 24, 2016

Wednesday, January 20th, 2016

January 24, 2016

Registered nurse Deb Polmanteer talks about treatment and options for someone with chronic kidney disease. Upstate urologist Dmitriy Nikolavsky, MD, shares his expertise in surgical repair after gender reassignment surgery, and author Terri Cook tells about the memoir she wrote with her husband about their child’s transition. Syracuse University registered dietitian Tanya Horacek, PhD, explores the factors that influence college student weight gain.

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College students exercise but need to improve ‘eating competence,’ SU dietitian says

Friday, January 15th, 2016

Many students beginning college see a 5 percent increase in their body weight the first semester. And while 60 percent of students adopt an exercise routine, many also develop unhealthy habits, says registered dietitian nutritionist Tanya Horacek, PhD, of Syracuse University’s Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics. She says many students don’t eat enough whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and many have trouble sleeping. During the transition phase that is college, Horacek says, it’s important for students to improve their “eating competence.” “This is a very formidable time. They are learning habits that they will carry into adulthood.”

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New screenings for kids include cholesterol, depression, HIV

Thursday, December 10th, 2015

 

Beth Nelsen, MD

New guidelines suggesting that all children be screened for high cholesterol, depression and HIV are based on research showing rising numbers of kids with those problems, explains Upstate pediatrician Beth Nelsen, MD. Ages vary for the screenings — from 9 to 11 for cholesterol, and from 16 to 19 for HIV – which are updated  annually by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Many tests, including for anemia and heart failure, have already been added by pediatricians during checkups, Nelsen said.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: December 13, 2015

Thursday, December 10th, 2015

December 13, 2015

Upstate pediatrician Beth Nelsen, MD, discusses the new screening guidelines for children and adolescents. Health sciences librarian Cristina Pope tells about the Healthy Pets Project. Registered dietitian nutritionist Maureen Franklin gives advice on holiday eating.

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HealthLink on Air radio show: November 22, 2015

Friday, November 20th, 2015

November 22, 2015

Gynecologist Renee Mestad, MD, tells about the new medication designed to boost a woman’s libido. Endovascular neurosurgeon Grahame Gould, MD, discusses advances in stroke treatment. Philip Rose, a program coordinator at the Prevention Network of Central New York, provides an update on underage drinking. Orthopedic surgeon William Lavelle, MD, tells how to deal with a muscle pull, or knot, in a shoulder.

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Children facing surgery benefit from care from pediatric anesthesiologists

Friday, November 20th, 2015

Children are not just small adults, which explains the need for pediatric anesthesiologists like Upstate’s Joseph Resti, MD. Children – from newborns to teens — present special challenges when undergoing anesthesia, Resti says, explaining the additional training needed for his subspecialty. Resti also addresses parental concerns, safety improvements and a study underway to see whether anesthesia presents any long-term effects on children.

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Sleep problems among children are common, sometimes avoidable

Thursday, October 15th, 2015

Zafer Soultan, MD

Up to half of children have poor sleeping habits and behaviors, with about 10 percent having an actual disorder, says Zafer Soultan, MD, director of pediatric pulmonary and sleep medicine at Upstate’s Golisano Children’s Hospital. Sometimes these issues stem from physical problems, but often they involve youngsters who never learn to sleep alone, says Soultan, who also describes how disorders such as apnea can be diagnosed in Upstate’s pediatric sleep lab and how teens can display sleep problems as their body’s rhythms clash with school schedules.

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Most teens avoid alcohol, but a quarter of underage youth still drink, sometimes bingeing

Friday, October 9th, 2015

Host Linda Cohen with Philip Rose

Even though the message that alcohol can harm young people is getting through, a quarter of those under the legal age still drink alcohol. Among them, binge drinking and a rise in female drinking have been noted, according to Philip Rose, program coordinator for underage drinking for the Prevention Network of Central New York. Bad decisions, risky behaviors and harm to the still-developing adolescent brain are all consequences of alcohol use, and peer and other pressures glamorize alcohol, Rose says. Still, he says, parents, teachers and other adults can wield influence by modeling good behavior, developing a trusting relationship with their children and talking frankly about alcohol.

 

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Help is available to recognize, report suspected child abuse

Thursday, October 1st, 2015

Although it’s often difficult to detect, child abuse does leave signs – odd bruises, sudden emotional changes – and concerned adults have both a state hotline and local organizations that offer help, says pediatrician Ann Botash, MD of the Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital.

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