HealthLink On Air

Interviews

Quicker diagnosis of suspicious lumps; abortion’s changing legal history; challenges of vaccinating children: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, Sept. 25, 2016

September 22nd, 2016 by James Howe

Kamal Khurana, MD, talks about fine needle aspiration and cytopathology. Le Moyne College assistant professor Jonathan Parent, PhD, goes over changes in abortion laws over the years. Joseph Domachowske, MD, and Manika Suryadevara, MD, discuss the importance of childhood vaccinations.

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Check Up from the Neck Up: What’s more important than your health?

September 23rd, 2016 by James Howe

Psychologist Rich O’Neill, PhD, provides six important words to consider when the demands of life threaten to get in the way of your workout routine, in this “Check Up from the Neck Up” essay.

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Research aims to combat dengue, Zika and other mosquito-borne diseases

September 23rd, 2016 by James Howe

A man in Machala, Ecuador, looks at a sample of mosquitos collected by researchers collaborating with Upstate's Anna Stewart Ibarra, PhD. The man's wife contracted the dengue virus, which, like the Zika virus, is carried by mosquitos. (PHOTO BY DANY KROM)

Studies being conducted in Ecuador aim to document and alleviate mosquito-borne viruses including dengue fever and Zika, which plague tropical and subtropical regions of the world, including the southern United States. The varied work looks at everything from improving housing to perfecting a cheap mosquito trap, says Anna Stewart Ibarra, PhD (left), a researcher from Upstate’s Center for Global Health and Translational Science. She gives an update on the diseases and describes her fieldwork and collaborative efforts with Ecuador’s Ministry of Health. (Click here for a photo gallery by Dany Krom titled “vector-borne diseases,” showing a February 2016 flood in Machala, Ecuador, where Stewart Ibarra was among researchers studying the virus-carrying mosquitos and possible methods of control.)

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Disaster delivers unexpected, but possibly hopeful, lessons to researchers

September 23rd, 2016 by James Howe

Anna Stewart Ibarra, PhD (center), is shown in flooded Machala, Ecuador, in early 2016. She was also part of earthquake relief efforts in Ecuador, where she conducts research. (PHOTO BY DANY KROM)

During the April 2016 earthquake in Ecuador, Upstate’s Anna Stewart Ibarra, PhD, and her team of researchers in that country helped mobilize relief efforts, including setting up a basic health clinic and buying emergency supplies with a continuing fund through the Upstate Foundation. The researchers also saw the impact of the disaster on residents’ physical and mental health and how the quake worsened existing health problems, such as the mosquito-borne diseases Stewart Ibarra studies. Those observations and ongoing studies can help to prepare for future efforts to fight diseases and disasters.

 

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Sleep disorders can complicate other health issues

September 23rd, 2016 by James Howe

As many as 30 percent to 50 percent of adults have a sleep disorder, many without seeking treatment and some not even knowing they have one. These disorders – insomnia, restless leg syndrome and jet lag are among the better-known ones – can worsen other health issues, such as blood pressure, anxiety and cardiovascular disease, says Karen Klingman, PhD, an associate professor of nursing at Upstate who specializes in sleep disorders. She explains the six basic sleep disorders, tells of a sleep questionnaire she is developing to help doctors diagnose sleep problems and suggests sources of advice on the recommended amount of sleep one needs and related issues.

 

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Explaining, confronting low childhood vaccination rates in lower-income areas

September 22nd, 2016 by James Howe

Infectious disease specialists Joseph Domachowske, MD, and Manika Suryadevara, MD, explain why immunization rates among low-income residents in Syracuse have been higher than in other parts of the country, in this reissue of a 2013 interview. The two Upstate pediatricians were recently honored with the Salvation Army’s highest civic honor (see photo) for their efforts to provide free flu shots to parents and children who registered for the Salvation Army’s annual holiday toy distribution, as part of a program designed to provide education to participating families about the flu vaccine. Read their study on vaccinations in low-income households here.

 

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Abortion laws in U.S. evolved over centuries

September 22nd, 2016 by James Howe

Laws governing abortion in America have changed over time, from no laws in Colonial days, when it was considered a medical issue, to the various state restrictions seen today. In the 1820s, states started restricting medicines that women took to induce abortions, mostly out of concern for the women’s health, and abortion also became a legal matter, says Jonathan Parent, PhD, a political science professor at Le Moyne College in Syracuse who studies the history of abortion law. He traces how such laws developed, explains the 1973 Roe vs. Wade Supreme Court decision and notes that public attitudes toward abortion have tended to remain stable for decades.

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Fine needle aspiration offers less-invasive alternative to surgical biopsy

September 22nd, 2016 by James Howe

A simple procedure can give a diagnosis of a suspicious lump fairly quickly and with little pain or inconvenience. Called fine needle aspiration, this process can often determine whether someone’s tumor is cancerous, says Kamal Khurana, MD, professor of pathology and medical director of cytopathology at Upstate. He explains how the needle draws cells from the tumor and that it hurts about as much as getting a flu shot. This process can let the patient avoid the more expensive, more involved and more invasive procedure of a surgical biopsy.

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Falls and how to prevent them; art therapy for hospitalized children; volunteering for medical work overseas: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, Sept. 18, 2016

September 15th, 2016 by James Howe

Sept. 18, 2016

Exercise physiologist Carol Sames, PhD, tells about balance, core strength and preventing falls. Maria Fazzini explains the value of art therapy for children at the Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital. Nurse Brooke Fraser discusses her overseas volunteer work.

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Exercise, other measures can help prevent falls

September 14th, 2016 by James Howe

Preventing falls is a prime concern as people age because of the injuries and challenges to mobility and self-confidence falls can cause. Paying attention to regular exercise, balance and core strength, even among the elderly, can help prevent falls, says Carol Sames, PhD, an exercise physiologist and director of Upstate’s Vitality Fitness Program. She explains age-related changes that can predispose people to falls and gives some simple suggestions toward fall prevention.

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Treating injured children; bullying’s long-term effects; ethics and end-of-life choices: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, Sept. 11, 2016

September 8th, 2016 by James Howe

Sept. 11, 2016

Upstate surgeon Kim Wallenstein, MD, discusses pediatric trauma. Syracuse University associate professor of social work Ellen deLara, PhD, shares research on adults who were bullied as children. Ethicists Thomas Curran, MD, and Robert Olick, JD, PhD, explain why end-of-life care decisions should be made before a crisis.

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Bullying can cause troubles that go on for years

September 8th, 2016 by James Howe

While there is no single definition of bullying, it can be described as mean-spirited, disrespectful treatment designed to make people feel bad. Bullying can be found among all ages groups, take place once or go on for years, and often occurs online, explains family therapist Ellen deLara, PhD, an associate professor of social work at Syracuse University who researches this behavior. While some people can become stronger after being bullied, others face medical and emotional problems later on, a topic she details in a new book, “Bullying Scars: The Impact on Adult Life and Relationships.” Children who are different in any way are prime victims of bullies, says deLara, who stresses the importance of getting help for those who are bullied.

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