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Alternative approaches to pain relief; talcum powder’s possible link to cancer; a doctor’s effort to help his native land: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, April 15, 2018

April 10th, 2018 by James Howe

WRVO Public Media and NPR logosPediatric rheumatologist Caitlin Sgarlat Deluca, DO, tells how integrative medicine helps manage pain without drugs. Gynecologist Jennifer Makin, MD, discusses the possible connection between talcum powder and ovarian cancer.  Cancer researcher Mobin Karimi, MD, PhD, talks about the charity work he is doing for his native Afghanistan.

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How to give antidote for opioid overdose; how high blood pressure affects pregnancy; protecting kids’ heads in winter sports: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, April 8, 2018

April 5th, 2018 by James Howe

WRVO Public Media and NPR logosToxicologist Willie Eggleston, PharmD, explains how to administer naloxone to save someone who has overdosed on opioids. Obstetrician John Folk, MD, addresses high blood pressure in pregnancy. Nurse Kim Nasby and pediatric surgeon Kim Wallenstein, MD, PhD, discuss how ski helmets can avert brain trauma in children.

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Why — and when — you need to discuss colon health, screening with your doctor

April 5th, 2018 by James Howe

Sekou Rawlins, MD (photo by Jim Howe)

Sekou Rawlins, MD (photo by Jim Howe)

Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers diagnosed in men and women, and it can be preventable in people who receive proper screening. Upstate gastroenterologist Sekou Rawlins, MD, urges people to reduce their risk for developing colon or rectal cancer by following a healthy diet high in fiber and by discussing with their doctor which screening method is best for their situation. People with a family history of certain cancers, and those with bowel diseases including ulcerative colitis are at increased risk and may require more vigilant screening. People at normal risk are usually recommended for screening starting at age 50. Rawlins talks about the various screening methods, along with the signs and symptoms of colorectal cancer you should not ignore.

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How integrative medicine can help manage pain

April 5th, 2018 by James Howe

Caitlin Sgarlat Deluca, DO (photo by Jim Howe)

Caitlin Sgarlat Deluca, DO (photo by Jim Howe)

Upstate pediatric rheumatologist Caitlin Sgarlat Deluca, DO, explains the variety of methods she makes available through the Pediatric Integrative Medicine Center for patients from age 2 to 22 who are experiencing pain. Acupuncture, tai chi, music and art therapy, yoga, meditation and energy therapies are among the services available. Sometimes these techniques are paired with traditional medical treatment. Deluca discusses the different types of pain, what’s normal and what’s not, and how nutrition plays a role.

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How a pediatrician started a diaper bank to meet a community need

April 5th, 2018 by James Howe

Winter Berry, DO (photo by Jim Howe)

Winter Berry, DO (photo by Jim Howe)

The journal Contemporary Pediatrics named Upstate pediatrician Winter Berry, DO, as a “pediatric change maker,” in honor of her work starting a diaper bank for families in need. Berry discusses how the diaper bank began, what it has grown into and the impact it can have on the lives of children in Central New York. The award she won is given annually to pediatricians who exemplify the “tireless advocacy for children” of the journal’s founder, the late Frank Oski, MD, who was chairman of pediatrics at Upstate for several years.

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A psychological perspective on the Ebola crisis, from US service members sent to West Africa

April 5th, 2018 by James Howe

Stephen Thomas, MD (photo by Jim Howe)

Stephen Thomas, MD (photo by Jim Howe)

When 3,000 United States service members were deployed to West Africa during the Ebola crisis from 2014 to 2016, Stephen Thomas, MD, and Army colleagues investigated their psychological perspectives. The researchers share their findings in a pair of papers published in the journals Military Medicine and Public Health. The research discusses sleep problems, stressors and the effect of quarantine. Upon return from West Africa, the service members were quarantined for 21 days. Thomas, now a professor of medicine and of microbiology and immunology at Upstate, specializes in infectious diseases. He says none of the service members contracted Ebola during deployment, but a few developed malaria. 

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Knee replacements can now be done as one-day surgeries

April 5th, 2018 by James Howe

Timothy Damron, MD (photo by Jim Howe)

Timothy Damron, MD (photo by Jim Howe)

Some patients can safely undergo surgery to have their knee joint replaced and go home the same day, says Timothy Damron, MD, the vice chairman for orthopedic surgery at Upstate. Patients who are relatively healthy and motivated may qualify for the one-day, or swift knee, procedure, he explains.

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Hospital is opening new pharmacy to patients, employees, visitors

April 5th, 2018 by James Howe

Registered pharmacists Eric Balotin, left, and David Geloso (photo by Jim Howe)

Registered pharmacists Eric Balotin, left, and David Geloso (photo by Jim Howe)

In May, Upstate University Hospital is opening a pharmacy in the main lobby that will fill prescriptions for patients, employees and visitors. Registered pharmacists Eric Balotin and David Geloso describe how patients will be able to receive their medications to take home before they are discharged, as well as speak to a pharmacist, if needed.The pharamcy will be open from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekends.

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Women with high blood pressure can have a safe pregnancy

March 30th, 2018 by James Howe

John Folk, MD

John Folk, MD

Women who have high blood pressure ideally should seek medical care prior to becoming pregnant, says John Folk, MD, a clinical associate professor in Upstate’s department of obstetrics and gynecology. He explains that high blood pressure, known as hypertension, can pose risks during pregnancy. He also explains why it’s reasonable to expect that a woman can deliver a healthy baby if her high blood pressure is carefully monitored and controlled during pregnancy.

 
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Upstate scientists investigate increase in black lung disease among coal miners

March 30th, 2018 by James Howe

Jerrold Abraham, MD, left, and Soma Sanyal, MD (photo by Richard Whelsky)

Jerrold Abraham, MD, left, and Soma Sanyal, MD (photo by Richard Whelsky)

Upstate pathology professor Jerrold Abraham, MD, and assistant professor Soma Sanyal, MD, are examining lung tissue from coal miners with black lung disease, as part of a large study into the reasons for a recent increase in the disease, which is also known as coal worker’s pneumoconiosis. The increase may have to do with changes in coal mining technology, as well as the enforcement of safety regulations, says Abraham. The study will continue for three years. 

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How naloxone can save life of someone who overdoses on opioids

March 30th, 2018 by James Howe

Willie Eggleston, a doctor of pharmacy at Upstate (photo by Jim Howe)

Willie Eggleston, a doctor of pharmacy at Upstate (photo by Jim Howe)

Naloxone, a medication that can reverse the effects of an opioid overdose, can be purchased over the counter from pharmacies in New York and several other states, says Willie Eggleston, a clinical toxicologist and doctor of pharmacy from the Upstate New York Poison Center. He explains how to administer naloxone, which is sold under the brand name Narcan, and how the medication works. He also tells about the Good Samaritan Law designed to protect people who are trying to help. To contact Eggleston about naloxone training for groups of medical or lay people, call 315-464-8906. For more detailed information about naloxone, visit the New York State Department of Health website or this video (including demonstrations on how to administer naloxone, which starts at 44:37), from the SUNY University at Buffalo College of Pharmacy.

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Pediatric trauma specialists push for mandatory helmets for some children’s winter sports

March 30th, 2018 by James Howe

Kim Wallenstein, MD, PhD, left, and nurse Kim Nasby (photo by Jim Howe)

Kim Wallenstein, MD, PhD, left, and nurse Kim Nasby (photo by Jim Howe)

Bicyclists under the age of 14 are required to wear bike helmets in New York state, and pediatric trauma experts from the Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital say it’s important that young skiers, snowboarders and snow tubers also wear head protection. Kim Wallenstein, MD, PhD, and nurse Kim Nasby explain how helmets can prevent or reduce the severity of injuries sustained from skiing or snowboarding. They explain how to choose the proper helmet — and stress that bike helmets are not interchangeable with winter helmets.

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