HealthLink On Air

Interviews

Update on eating habits, weight; bipolar disorder; abnormal uterine bleeding: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, Feb. 19, 2017

February 17th, 2017 by James Howe

Registered dietitian nutritionist Maureeen Franklin provides a nutrition update. Psychiatrist Thomas Schwartz, MD, gives an overview of bipolar disorder. And gynecologist Howard Weinstein, MD, explains the causes of and treatments for abnormal uterine bleeding.

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Dealing with bullying; getting kids to love reading; medical scholarship with historic ties: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, Feb. 12, 2017

February 9th, 2017 by James Howe

Pediatrician Ann Botash, MD, talks about raising children who are resistant to bullying. Pediatrician Jaclyn Sisskind, MD, shares how to establish the habit of reading. Bruce Simmons, MD, and medical student James Osei-Sarpong tell about the historic Sarah Loguen Fraser scholarship.

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How to raise children who are resistant to bullying

February 9th, 2017 by James Howe

Experts estimate that almost all children, at some point, will experience bullying behavior — either as a victim, as an observer, or as the bully. Some bullying takes place in real life, but much of it takes place in social media, says pediatrician Ann Botash, MD. She sees so-called cyberbullying as a growing problem and counsels parents to stay involved in their children’s lives. Botash talks about how to raise children who are resistant to bullying, things that might put a child at risk for being bullid, and the role of someone who is a witness to bullying. Click here for information and resources on bullying from Upstate’s Child Abuse Referral and Evaluation (CARE) Program; click here for more about bullying from Olweus, a national bullying prevention program that Botash also mentions.

 

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When do you need an orthopedic surgeon who specializes in trauma?

February 9th, 2017 by James Howe

Brian Kistler, MD, an Upstate orthopedic surgeon with trauma fellowship training, is one of the specialists likely to care for you if you break bones in a serious traumatic injury. Kistler has developed expertise in caring for patients with nonunions (bone fractures that have not healed properly) and malunions (bones that have improperly alligned), situations that may require additional surgery. He explains his role and why broken bones seem to grow back stronger.

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A pediatrician shares her love of reading with some book suggestions

February 9th, 2017 by James Howe

Books are one tool parents can use for help broaching difficult subjects with their kids, says Upstate pediatrician Jaclyn Sisskind, MD. An enthusiastic reader herself, Sisskind talks about the ritual of reading and shares recommendations for books that are appropriate for different ages. She also recommends these sources for help finding books: www.kidsreads.com, www.spaghettibookclub.org, www.slimekids.com/book-reviews, www.dogobooks.com, www.teenreads.com, www.goodreads.com, www.onlib.org, aaps.npr.org/best-books-2016.

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Heart treatment with stereotaxis; update on smoking, e-cigarettes; gun violence as public health concern: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, Feb. 5, 2017

February 2nd, 2017 by James Howe

Luna Bhatta, MD, talks about stereotaxis to treat specific heart problems. Leslie Kohman, MD, provides an update on cigarette smoking and electronic cigarettes. Margaret Formica, PhD, explains how firearm violence is a public health issue.

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Scholarship winner embodies some traits of pioneering doctor Sarah Loguen Fraser

February 2nd, 2017 by James Howe

Sarah Loguen Fraser earned her medical degree in 1876 from the Syracuse University College of Medicine, the predecessor to what is now the Upstate Medical University College of Medicine. She was the first African-American woman to become a doctor at this school, and one of the first in the nation. Bruce Simmons, MD (at left in photo), tells about the scholarship that bears her name, and this year’s recipient, medical student James Osei-Sarpong (at right), tells what it means to him.

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Gun violence spreads like infectious disease, researchers find

February 2nd, 2017 by James Howe

Public health specialists, concerned about what they call an epidemic of firearm violence, have agreed on some tactics they hope will help reduce the number of people killed or injured by guns. Assistant professor Margaret Formica, PhD, from Upstate’s department of public health and preventive medicine, says some studies have tracked gun violence, revealing trends similar to those seen in the spread of infectious diseases such as influenza. She says efforts are underway to improve gun safety and that more academic research is needed. Click here for a look at the research and here for an analysis of that research.

 

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Treating specific heart problems with stereotaxis

February 2nd, 2017 by James Howe

Some rapid heart rhythms require treatment that involves snaking a tube into the heart. A remote navigational system called stereotaxis gives cardiologists more flexibility to maneuver the tube and exposes patients to less radiation than through traditional methods. Luna Bhatta, MD, director of the clinical cardiac electrophysiology lab and the arrhythmia service at Upstate University Hospital, explains how stereotaxis works.

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Explaining glaucoma; female urinary health; outdoor project for people with disabilities: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, Jan. 29, 2017

January 27th, 2017 by James Howe

Robert Fechtner, MD, tells about the causes of and treatments for glaucoma. Elizabeth Ferry, MD, addresses female urologic health from youth to old age. Nienke Dosa, MD, shares an inclusive outdoor project for people with disabilities.

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Check Up from the Neck Up: Relationship repair

January 25th, 2017 by James Howe

In this “Check Up from the Neck Up” essay, psychologist Rich O’Neill, PhD, assumes the role of a “relationship repairman” as he talks through a strategy for getting past an argument with your significant other.

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A visit from The Healing Muse: ‘Jigsaw’ and ‘Prognosis’

January 20th, 2017 by James Howe

Deirdre Neilen, PhD, shares a selection from Upstate’s literary journal, “The Healing Muse,” every Sunday on “HealthLink on Air.” Neilen is the editor of the annual publication featuring fiction, poetry, essays and visual art focused on themes of medicine, illness, disability and healing. Read The Healing Muse Cafe Blog.



Today’s selections are “Jigsaw,” by Ted McCarthy, and “Prognosis,” by Kathleen M. Kelley, and can be found in “The Healing Muse, Volume 16.” Order your copy of “The Healing Muse” today.

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