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Reversing the opioid epidemic; emergency care for seniors; online help to improve eating habits: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, Dec. 10, 2017

December 8th, 2017 by James Howe

WRVO Public Media and NPR logosNurse practitioner Theresa Baxter talks about pain control and reversing the opioid epidemic. Emergency physician James Ciaccio, MD, discusses medical emergencies that affect seniors. Registered dietitian nutritionist Maureen Franklin shares a website that can help improve eating habits.

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Are you addicted to your cellphone?

December 6th, 2017 by James Howe

Christopher Lucas, MDIt’s more a compulsion than an addiction, but many people have unhealthy attachments to their smartphones, says Upstate psychiatrist Christopher Lucas, MD, left. A survey by the Pew Research Center found 46 percent of smartphone owners said they could not live without their phones. Lucas tells of another survey in which almost half of respondents said they’d rather break their arm than their cellphone. He says a person’s cellphone use may be excessive if it interferes with aspects of everyday life such as sleep and social interactions. Lucas advocates for people to create digital-free zones or digital-free times in order to help reduce dependence on phones, and he points out that the dominant psychological characteristic of those who use phones excessively is loneliness.

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Breast-feeding medicine program includes lactation consultants, physicians, nurse practitioners

December 6th, 2017 by James Howe

Michele Dwyer, RNMany aspects of breast-feeding come naturally to mother and baby, but there can be challenges. New moms may benefit from seeing a lactation consultant or a specialist in breast-feeding medicine, an Upstate program that accepts patients from anywhere (call 315-464-2192 or click here for more information). Nurse and lactation consultant Michele Dwyer, above, says she encourages moms to set aside their cellphones and look at their babies while breast-feeding. She also explains how dad or another support person can be helpful to new moms.

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Sharing tragic news with children; explaining weight-loss surgery; why sperm counts are declining: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, Dec. 3, 2017

December 1st, 2017 by James Howe

WRVO Public Media and NPR logosPsychologist Wendy Gordon, PhD, talks about helping kids deal with tragedy in the news. Weight-loss surgeon Jesse Gutnick, MD, discusses today’s surgical options. Andrologist Kazim Chohan, PhD, explains why sperm counts are declining.

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Why senior citizens are prone to falls — and what you can do to help

November 30th, 2017 by James Howe

Jamie Ciaccio, MDOne in four people over the age of 65 suffers a fall each year — and these falls can be deadly. Falls are the leading cause of fatal injury among senior citizens, and they are responsible for about 2.8 million visits to a hospital emergency department every year. Upstate emergency physician James Ciaccio, MD, left, routinely cares for people who have fallen. He explains why it’s as crucial to determine what caused someone to fall as it is to treat the complications from a fall. Chronic medical conditions, acute illnesses and medication side effects can all contribute to someone falling. Ciaccio also notes that recovery can be lengthy.

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Ear, nose and throat expert describes diagnosis, treatment of Meniere’s disease

November 30th, 2017 by James Howe

Charles Woods, MDHearing and balance are affected when someone has Meniere’s disease. A person may experience progressive hearing loss, a feeling of fullness in one ear, a ringing in the ears called tinnitus and/or episodes of vertigo or severe dizziness. Ear, nose and throat physician Charles Woods, MD, left, says many patients with Meniere’s become reclusive because the symptoms are so debilitating and unpredictable. They don’t want to risk having an episode in public. Woods explains that most people with Meniere’s are able to manage their symptoms by following a low-sodium diet and taking diuretic medication to help control their fluid levels. Some patients, however, require surgical intervention, and Woods explains the various methods that may offer relief.

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Researcher explains ‘tummy time,’ seeks newborns for study

November 30th, 2017 by James Howe

Erin Wentz, PhDThe American Academy of Pediatrics says babies need to be placed to sleep on their backs to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome during the first year of life. But daily supervised play time while on their tummies is recommended for developmental reasons. Upstate physical therapist Erin Wentz, PhD, above, says this supervised time is important for babies to help strengthen their neck and trunk but also to stimulate exploration. She’s leading a study to determine the best daily cumulative amount of “tummy time” and seeks full-term newborns up to 8 weeks of age to participate. The study continues with monthly home visits by Wentz until the baby reaches 18 months of age. To learn more, send her an email at wentze@upstate.edu.

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Recognizing signs of a heart attack; how HPV affects men; risks of inherited cancer: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, Nov. 26, 2017

November 21st, 2017 by James Howe

WRVO Public Media and NPR logosCardiologist Robert Carhart, MD, goes over heart attack symptoms in both men and women. Urologists Michael Daugherty. MD, and Timothy Byler, MD, discuss human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in men. Genetic counselor Gloria Morris, MD, PhD, talks about cancers that are inherited.

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How to detect, treat rising problem of anxiety in children, teens

November 17th, 2017 by James Howe

Nancy Goodman, PhDUpstate child psychologist Nancy Goodman, PhD, says parents face a balancing act as they try to help a growing number of children who have anxiety. She helps children as young as age 5 learn coping skills. Goodman differentiates between what’s normal and what defines a clinical disorder, explains how anxiety presents itself and how it may change across the lifespan.

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Laughing gas is offered to fight labor pain

November 17th, 2017 by James Howe

Laurie Fegley, nurse managerWomen giving birth at Upstate University Hospital’s Family Birth Center now have the option of using nitrous oxide, also known as laughing gas, to help control labor pain. Nurse manager Laurie Fegley, left, explains how the gas works and how it compares with epidural pain relief. She also tells about the private birthing rooms with whirlpool tubs that make up the Family Birth Center, located at Upstate’s Community campus. 

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Your dietary fiber needs; treating bladder cancer; preparing for long-term care: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, Nov. 19, 2017

November 16th, 2017 by James Howe

WRVO Public Media and NPR logosRegistered dietitian nutritionist Maureen Franklin gives an update on dietary fiber. Urologist Joseph Jacob, MD, discusses bladder cancer diagnosis and treatment. Nursing expert Helen Clancy tells how to ease the transition into long-term care.

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A Visit From The Healing Muse: ‘No Score’ and ‘Writing It Out’

November 16th, 2017 by James Howe

Deirdre Neilen, PhDDeirdre Neilen, PhD, left, shares a selection from Upstate’s literary journal, “The Healing Muse,” every Sunday on “HealthLink on Air.” Neilen is the editor of the annual publication featuring fiction, poetry, essays and visual art focused on themes of medicine, illness, disability and healing. Read The Healing Muse Cafe Blog.



Today’s selections are “No Score” and “Writing It Out,” both by Joyce Holmes McAllister, and can be found in “The Healing Muse, Volume 17.” Order your copy of “The Healing Muse” today.

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