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SU football coach Dino Babers talks about fitness and motivation

February 22nd, 2018 by James Howe

Dino Babers, head football coach at Syracuse University (photo by Jim Howe)

Dino Babers, head football coach at Syracuse University (photo by Jim Howe)

Dino Babers knew he wanted to be a coach from the time he was 6 years old, even before he found his sport. Today as head football coach at Syracuse University, Babers motivates student athletes. He talks about what that’s like, as well as the training regimen for SU football players and how non-athletes can make fitness a part of their lives. He also shares his favorite sports movies: “The Natural,” “Field of Dreams” and “Remember the Titans.”

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How children’s health care has changed; safe sleeping for babies; what’s in a neurological exam: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, Feb. 25, 2018

February 22nd, 2018 by James Howe

WRVO Public Media and NPR logosRetiring pediatrician Thomas Welch, MD, looks back at the opening of Golisano Children’s Hospital and changes in children’s health care. Nurse Michelle Jeski describes safe sleeping practices for infants. Neurosurgeon Lawrence Chin, MD, tells what to expect in a neurological exam.

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Program aims to help children overcome feeding disorders

February 22nd, 2018 by James Howe

Heather Kadey

Heather Kadey (photo by Jim Howe)

Some children during early childhood refuse to eat certain types of foods or sufficient amounts of food. If this goes on long enough to affect their weight gain, growth or development, it might be time to see someone who specializes in feeding therapy. Heather Kadey is a behavior analyst who directs the feeding program in Upstate’s department of pediatrics. She explains that patients may come to her after a medical evaluation from a pediatric gastroenterologist. Sometimes a complicated medical issue impacts a child’s ability or willingness to eat normally. Some feeding disorders are tied to autism. Kadey explains the therapy and emphasizes that feeding disorders are not the result of bad parenting.

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What happens when a pregnant woman has hepatitis C

February 22nd, 2018 by James Howe

Helene Bernstein, MD, PhD (photo by Jim Howe)

Helene Bernstein, MD, PhD (photo by Jim Howe)

Rates of hepatitis C infections are on the rise among adults in the United States, and some of those adults are pregnant women. Helene Bernstein, MD, PhD, explains how the disease can easily be diagnosed through a blood test and treated with medication. (Click here for a paper she published on this topic.) She’s an associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology and of microbiology and immunology at Upstate.

 

 

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Team of experts cares for patients with cancers of the stomach, esophagus, liver, pancreas or bile ducts

February 22nd, 2018 by James Howe

Jason Wallen, MD, left, and Ajay Jain, MD (photo by Jim Howe)

Jason Wallen, MD, left, and Ajay Jain, MD (photo by Jim Howe)

Stomach and esophageal cancers can be complex, difficult to distinguish and variable in terms of treatment recommendations. Patients who seek care through the Upstate Cancer Center now benefit from a multidisciplinary team approach, in which surgeons, oncologists, radiologists and other caregivers collaborate about the best options for individual patients. Surgeons Jason Wallen, MD, and Ajay Jain, MD, explain this approach to cancers of the upper portion of the digestive system, known as the foregut, which includes the pancreas, liver and bile ducts, in addition to the stomach and esophagus.

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Update on e-cigarettes, explaining hemorrhoids, treatments for blood cancers: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, Feb. 18, 2018

February 15th, 2018 by James Howe

WRVO Public Media and NPR logosLee Livermore and Michele Caliva from the Upstate New York Poison Center provide an update on e-cigarette use. Jeffrey Albright, MD, discusses hemorrhoids. Jeffrey Pu, MD, PhD, and Meghan Lewis, RN, talk about forthcoming  treatments for patients with blood cancers.

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Simple practices help keep babies safe while sleeping

February 15th, 2018 by James Howe

nurse Michelle JeskiTeaching parents the safest ways for their infants to sleep is a mission at Upstate, through its Family Birth Center, Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital and its outpatient clinics. The goal is to prevent sleep-related injuries and deaths, explains Michelle Jeski, left, a nurse at the children’s hospital. Among things to avoid: sleeping in the same bed as the infant, falling asleep on a couch with the infant or having objects in the crib, she says. The children’s hospital was recently honored for its commitment to safe infant sleep practices and provides an online sleep safety tip sheet.

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What you need to know about colorectal cancer, its prevention

February 15th, 2018 by James Howe

Jiri Bem, MDColorectal cancer incidence would drop by 90 percent if everyone followed recommendations and underwent a screening colonoscopy starting at age 50, colorectal surgeon Jiri Bem, MD, left, says in this interview. Among cancers that affect both men and women, colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. But the disease is highly preventable. Bem goes over the risk factors and symptoms of colorectal cancer, as well as the common treatments.

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New treatment options for people with blood cancers

February 15th, 2018 by James Howe

Jeffrey Pu, MD, PhD, left, and nurse Meghan Lewis

Jeffrey Pu, MD, PhD, left, and nurse Meghan Lewis

Patients with blood cancers will have new treatment options in addition to stem cell transplants now available at the Upstate Cancer Center. Jeffrey Pu, MD, PhD, and clinical leader Meghan Lewis, RN,  tell about the addition of allogeneic stem cell transplants and CAR T-cell therapy. Allogeneic stem cell transplants use stem cells from donors. T-cells are a type of white blood cells, and chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy is a process in which the patient’s own T-cells are engineered to better attack cancer cells.

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An anti-stroke device for some heart patients; a plan to reduce violence; more space for teen psychiatric patients: Upstate Medical University’s HealthLink on Air for Sunday, Feb. 11, 2018

February 9th, 2018 by James Howe

WRVO Public Media and NPR logosJamal Ahmed, MD, and nurse Scott Davis discuss a new way to decrease stroke risk in some heart patients with atrial fibrillation. Nurse Kim Nasby and social worker Chanel Beard talk about reducing violence. Wanda Fremont, MD, tells of a forthcoming hospital unit for adolescent psychiatry patients.

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A pediatrics leader reflects on successes and ongoing challenges in child health care

February 8th, 2018 by James Howe

Thomas Welch, MD

Tom Welch, MD (left), is retiring this year after 17 years at Upstate. He’s the chair of the department of pediatrics at Upstate Medical University and the medical director of the Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital. He oversaw the creation of the children’s hospital, which enabled Upstate to attract a variety of pediatric specialists. In this interview, Welch talks about national, regional and local challenges in child health care, as well as successes that have taken place during his 45-year career.

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What you need to know about hemorrhoids

February 8th, 2018 by James Howe

Jeffrey Albright, MDMany adults have hemorrhoids, which are usually only a problem if they cause bothersome symptoms, such as pain, itching and/or bleeding. Upstate colon and rectal surgeon Jeffrey Albright, MD, advises some ways to minimize discomfort. He recommends making sure your diet includes adequate amounts of fiber and limiting the amount of time spent straining on the toilet. Topical hemorrhoid creams and/or laxatives may be useful, too. Albright also explains methods for removing hemorrhoids.

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